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Article
Publication date: 6 December 2019

Despoina Filiou, Heinz Tusselmann and Lawrence Green

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of alliance experience in firm innovation; it argues that, while cumulative alliance experience has a marginally…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of alliance experience in firm innovation; it argues that, while cumulative alliance experience has a marginally diminishing contribution to likelihood of firm innovation over time, frequent engagement in alliances and an expanding alliance portfolio inhabit an enhancing role. This reveals new dimensions to the role of alliance experience as an antecedent to firm learning in managing alliances and to the development of alliance capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper estimates a range of models identifying the relationship between alliance experience and firm innovation. The panel data sample captures the full range of firms active in the UK bio-pharmaceuticals sector during the early stages of its development observing them from 1991 to 2001. An exploratory case study analysis is employed to shed light on the nuanced factors linking frequent engagement in alliances to the development of practices for efficient alliance management.

Findings

The paper shows that cumulative alliance experience has a marginally diminishing contribution to likelihood of firm innovation over time, while frequent engagement in alliances and the ensuing expansion of alliance portfolios enhance firm innovation. The exploratory case analysis demonstrates a link between frequent engagement in alliances and the development of processes for alliance management that could collectively reflect alliance capabilities.

Originality/value

Contribution derives from a longitudinal analysis of an original panel data set that maps the UK bio-pharmaceuticals sector over the initial period of its development. The paper sheds light on factors that can compel firms to form alliance capabilities, and extends a currently thin body of work on the foundations and antecedents to alliance and alliance portfolio capabilities.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Nicola Mendleson and Michael Jay Polonsky

Manufacturers of consumer goods face various problems when theyattempt to integrate environmental attributes into their marketing mix.In many cases the inclusion of…

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11177

Abstract

Manufacturers of consumer goods face various problems when they attempt to integrate environmental attributes into their marketing mix. In many cases the inclusion of environmental issues in the marketing mix is largely motivated by the organization′s desire to address consumers′ increasing level of environmental awareness. However, producers face three problems when they attempt to utilize environmental marketing: a lack of credibility; consumer cynicism; consumer confusion over claims. Strategic alliances with environmental groups can assist manufacturers of consumer goods to overcome these problems, as well as provide other advantages. These other advantages are: increased consumer reliability in green products and their claims; increased access to environmental information; increased access to new markets; publicity and reduced public criticism; and education of consumers about key environmental issues relating to a firm′s product. To achieve these benefits, producers need to follow a careful selection process when choosing an environmental strategic alliance partner. This selection process includes: determine alliance objectives; specify outcomes desired; and determine the fit between the organization, environmental group, and target market.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Julie Tryon

Since the mid‐1960s, people have begun to change their attitudes towards death and the role it plays in our society. Many find problems with the fact that an increasing…

Abstract

Since the mid‐1960s, people have begun to change their attitudes towards death and the role it plays in our society. Many find problems with the fact that an increasing number of people die in old age, afflicted with chronic diseases, and that a majority of people in the United States die in public institutions such as hospitals, extended care facilities, or convalescent homes. Questions have been raised regarding the extent to which technology should be used to keep someone alive, when doing so seems futile or even cruel. We are beginning to realize that our society at present does not deal effectively with this growing populaton of the aged.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Bridget Martin and Antonis C. Simintiras

The literature examining the behaviour of environmentally consciousconsumers has focused mainly on the examination of non‐product specificenvironmental knowledge and…

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8830

Abstract

The literature examining the behaviour of environmentally conscious consumers has focused mainly on the examination of non‐product specific environmental knowledge and attitudes or environmental knowledge and attitudes in relation to single product lines. Employs the constructs of product‐line‐specific environmental knowledge and attitudes, that is knowledge of and attitudes towards the green products and their impact on the environment. Presents the results of an exploratory study examining the relationship between product‐line‐specific environmental knowledge and attitudes for multiple green product lines, testing hypotheses generated from the literature, utilizing a questionnaire measuring self‐reports of environmental knowledge and attitudes. The results show no direct relationship exists between product‐line‐specific environmental knowledge and attitudes, and that consumers do not simply believe that a green product is good for the environment without also knowing how the product impacts on the environment.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

Henri Simula, Tuula Lehtimäki and Jari Salo

Technology product manufacturers and marketers must take into account that customers' awareness and appreciation of the benefits of green technology and products have…

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4239

Abstract

Purpose

Technology product manufacturers and marketers must take into account that customers' awareness and appreciation of the benefits of green technology and products have increased. The purpose of this paper is to determine how technology firms can benefit from green marketing and what pitfalls there are to avoid.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review of green marketing literature, the paper introduces four approaches to green marketing by means of a matrix outlining four factors associated with perceived and actual greenness of new products and new technology. Then, for each of the four approaches, an appropriate coping strategy is proposed that includes the issues that firms should consider when they use green marketing.

Findings

Customers' green values should be well understood when marketing plans for technology products are developed and implemented. Green marketing arguments should be communicated to customers in a coherent and truthful way, to avoid customer scepticism or disbelief.

Research limitations/implications

The paper calls for an increased awareness of the way to utilize green marketing in technology firms. Supporting empirical evidence is still needed from future studies.

Originality/value

The contribution of the paper to academics and practitioners is increased understanding of how green marketing can be applied in technology firms.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2014

Yifei Li

Since the publication of the 1987 Brundtland Report, discussions about sustainable development have been nothing short of a buzz among politicians and academics. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Since the publication of the 1987 Brundtland Report, discussions about sustainable development have been nothing short of a buzz among politicians and academics. This chapter takes stock of an emerging strand of the sustainable city literature that recognizes local political dynamics, conflicts of interest, and power struggles.

Approach

The review is organized into three sections. The first section reviews how past studies have utilized sustainable urban development as an opportunity for advancing theories of urban politics, highlighting recent developments in the growth machine, regulatory state, and risk society theses. The second section examines a range of studies that place the questions of scale, unit, and boundary at the center of inquiry. The third section draws together a body of research that interrogates different meanings of sustainability.

Implications

The first section discusses the extent to which social and political processes in the sustainability age exhibit a pattern consistent with established theoretical accounts. The second section focuses on studies that address how urban sustainable development has brought challenges to existing configurations of spatial relations. These studies pose important methodological and epistemological questions for studying environmental politics. In the third section, the focus is placed on political implications of urban sustainable development, which is subject to multiple interpretations.

Originality

This chapter ends with a review of an emerging thesis – strategic urbanism, which draws attention to the patterns of change in urban politics. Much of the contributions to this thesis are based on urban sustainability politics in recent years.

Details

From Sustainable to Resilient Cities: Global Concerns and Urban Efforts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-058-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Ricky Y.K. Chan and Lorett B.Y. Lau

Examines the influence of cultural values, ecological affect and ecological knowledge on the green purchasing behavior of Chinese consumers. Using structural equation…

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7855

Abstract

Examines the influence of cultural values, ecological affect and ecological knowledge on the green purchasing behavior of Chinese consumers. Using structural equation modeling to assess the significance that ecological affect and ecological knowledge have on green purchase intention and actual green purchase, the results demonstrate that a strong positive relationship exists. However, other important findings suggest that Chinese people’s level of ecological knowledge is low and actual green purchase behavior minimal. Yet in contrast, Chinese consumers express a positive ecological affect and green purchase intention. In relation to the hypothesis that the Chinese strongly adhere to the cultural value of living in harmony with nature, the relevant descriptive statistic shows that today’s Chinese only pay moderate allegiance to this “man‐nature” orientation. Moreover, this cultural value is only found to exert significant bearing on ecological affect but not ecological knowledge.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2019

Kofi Agyekum, Emmanuel Adinyira, Bernard Baiden, Godslove Ampratwum and Daniel Duah

This paper aims to identify the key barriers to the adoption of green certification of buildings in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the key barriers to the adoption of green certification of buildings in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts face-to-face and telephonic interviews with ten built environment professionals, using a semi-structured interview guide. Qualitative responses to the interview were thematically analysed using NVivo 11 Pro analysis application software.

Findings

The findings suggest that “lack of information on existing green buildings”, “lack of incentives”, “conservative nature of Ghanaians”, “lack of active government participation”, “inadequate human resource”, “lack of awareness of the benefits”, “cost and financing” and “lack of legal backing” are the eight key barriers that hinder the adoption of green certification of buildings.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to built environment professionals registered with their appropriate professional bodies. The findings cannot be generalized and extended to other developing countries that do not share similar characteristics and context with Ghana.

Practical implications

Practically, this study highlights, for the benefit of the construction industry and the government, the critical barriers to the adoption of green certification of buildings in Ghana. Identification of these barriers provides a pathway for the provision of pragmatic solutions towards the adoption of green buildings in Ghana.

Originality/value

Findings of the research make significant contribution to the debate on the barriers to the adoption of green certification of buildings. Four out of the eight barriers (inadequate awareness of the benefits of green certification of buildings, inadequate human resource, conservative nature of Ghanaian and lack of information on existing green buildings) identified are unique in the context of other related studies and advanced knowledge on the subject matter.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Foresight, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Bodo B. Schlegelmilch, Greg M. Bohlen and Adamantios Diamantopoulos

A review of the literature suggests that traditional segmentation variables (socio‐demographics) and personality indicators are of limited use for characterizing the green

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19598

Abstract

A review of the literature suggests that traditional segmentation variables (socio‐demographics) and personality indicators are of limited use for characterizing the green consumer. Explores the extent to which variables, specific to environmental consciousness, are better able to explain consumers’ pro‐environmental purchasing behaviour. Two conceptualizations of the purchasing domain are addressed, namely general green purchasing behaviour and specific purchasing habits relating to five green product categories. Two data sets are used in the analysis, namely marketing students and members of the United Kingdom general public. Suggests that measures of environmental consciousness are closely linked to environmentally‐responsible purchasing behaviour, although the strength of the relationships varies according to sample type, the conceptualization of the purchasing domain and the particular product category at issue.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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