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International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Bill Davidson

Bill Davidson provides a personal perspective about access to psychological therapies.

Abstract

Bill Davidson provides a personal perspective about access to psychological therapies.

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The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2007

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51

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International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2009

Mary O'Hagan

The leadership of people with lived experience of mental health problems is underdeveloped, when it comes to leadership in one's own recovery, at the service level, and at…

Abstract

The leadership of people with lived experience of mental health problems is underdeveloped, when it comes to leadership in one's own recovery, at the service level, and at the systemic level. Unlike the mental health system, the user/survivor movement has a values base of empowerment and equality. But the movement has not yet created an explicit model of leadership based on these values. Conventional models of leadership have little to offer but critiques of it provide a good framework for users and survivors to build its own model of leadership upon. If user/survivor leadership is to thrive, new roles, practices and competencies need to be developed. At a deeper level, there needs to be philosophical, psychological and political shifts in service systems if user/survivor leadership is to ever take root. Furthermore, the leadership of empowerment and equality should pervade all the leadership in service systems and beyond.

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International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2010

Michele Matherly and Laurie L. Burney

Accounting educators continue to look for efficient ways to introduce personal competencies into the curriculum. Prior literature contains numerous suggestions on how…

Abstract

Accounting educators continue to look for efficient ways to introduce personal competencies into the curriculum. Prior literature contains numerous suggestions on how faculty can implement a single personal competency, such as written communication. This chapter describes our strategy for integrating a variety of personal competencies using team projects. We implement this strategy by selecting projects that are content oriented and not only involve critical thinking but also address students’ skills related to written and oral communication, technology, teamwork, and leadership. We offer guidance on how to implement this project-oriented strategy and also provide selected tools for streamlining the assessment of student performance, such as sample grading rubrics and an online survey for evaluating team leader and team member performance. Feedback suggests that students perceived an improvement in their competencies as a result of the course's activities. While we bundled a variety of personal competencies within a managerial cost accounting course, instructors can easily adapt our strategy to any course in the curriculum.

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Advances in Accounting Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-292-1

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Linda M. Randall and Lori A. Coakley

To propose Heifetz's adaptive leadership model as the primary process for initiating change in today's more business‐oriented academic environment in which colleges and…

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8511

Abstract

Purpose

To propose Heifetz's adaptive leadership model as the primary process for initiating change in today's more business‐oriented academic environment in which colleges and universities are required to compete to attract students and are facing greater scrutiny and accountability from outside constituencies.

Design/methodology/approach

Two case studies are presented that underscore some of the challenges facing today's academic institutions. Heiftez's adaptive leadership model is applied to each case.

Findings

Leadership is more than an individual acting in a position. It is a process in which change initiatives must emanate from key stakeholders, all of whom are engaged in that process. The two cases presented in the paper serve to illustrate the greater potential for successful change initiatives offered by the adaptive leadership model.

Research limitations/implications

The research examines two specific case studies in which adaptive leadership dimensions are used to examine the success or failure of a change initiative. The study needs to be expanded to other situations to more fully explore the merits of this model. Other case studies are being examined.

Practical implications

The leadership model applied in this study can be used in any organization, academic or non‐academic, which is confronting change initiatives that require both immediate action and commitment from myriad stakeholders.

Originality/value

To date, no other studies have employed adaptive leadership as a process to address the demands of the more business‐oriented, academic environment.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Hsu‐Hua Lee and Brian H. Kleiner

States that inventory is the most significant financial asset of women’s clothing retailers, showing that the majority look at inventory management as a tool to improve…

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4042

Abstract

States that inventory is the most significant financial asset of women’s clothing retailers, showing that the majority look at inventory management as a tool to improve customer satisfaction. Suggests that satisfying customer needs results in increased revenues, greater liquidity, lower inventory levels and improved returns on investment. Considers the keys to successful inventory management using case studies as examples and concludes that many retailers are moving in the direction of continuous assessment of inventories rather than point in time assessments.

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Management Research News, vol. 24 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Sumith Gopura, Alice Ruth Payne, Laurie Buys and Deepthi Chandrika Bandara

Developing countries engaged in apparel value chain are going global, seeking opportunities to upgrade the industry through providing higher value-added products and…

Abstract

Purpose

Developing countries engaged in apparel value chain are going global, seeking opportunities to upgrade the industry through providing higher value-added products and services. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how Sri Lankan apparel industry designers interact with the western fashion world in the apparel value chain process, and how they acquire, adapt and apply the knowledge needed to develop high-value fashion products in their fashion design practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a qualitative approach through semi-structured interviews conducted with fashion design and product development professionals in the Sri Lankan apparel industry. An inductive thematic analysis is used in identifying participants’ experience of the western fashion world within their fashion design practice.

Findings

The study proposes a “fashion knowledge bridge” illustrating the ways in which Sri Lankan designers acquire and merge high-value fashion consumer culture and lifestyle knowledge with the manufacturing industry, through multisensory and virtual experience, termed “exposure”, in their interactions with the western fashion world as well as the manufacturing culture of the Sri Lankan apparel industry. Designers’ exposure improves the feasibility and reliability of their apparel products, aligning to the end-consumer needs. The study also proposes a “designers’ exposure framework” that illustrates gains made by the Sri Lankan apparel industry resulting from knowledge enhancement through the designers’ exposure.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a qualitative methodology that has potential subjective biases on the part of the researchers; in this case only the Sri Lankan designers’ perspectives were used in synthesising the findings.

Originality/value

The findings propose frameworks with theoretical and managerial implications for developing designers’ capabilities in apparel manufacturing countries that seek industrial upgrading through value-added fashion design practice.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Jeffrey D. Ford, Laurie W. Ford and Randall T. McNamara

Resistance to change has generally been understood as a result of personal experiences and assessments about the reliability of others. Accordingly, attempts are made to…

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19053

Abstract

Resistance to change has generally been understood as a result of personal experiences and assessments about the reliability of others. Accordingly, attempts are made to alter these factors in order to win support and overcome resistance. But this understanding ignores resistance as a socially constructed reality in which people are responding more to the background conversations in which the change is being initiated than to the change itself. This paper proposes that resistance to change is a function of the ongoing background conversations that are being spoken and which create the context for both the change initiative and the responses to it. In this context, resistance is not a personal phenomenon, but a social systemic one in which resistance is maintained by the background conversations of the organization. Successfully dealing with this source of resistance requires distinguishing the background conversations and completing the past.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2012

Abstract

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Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-761-1

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