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Article

Husam‐Aldin Nizar Al‐Malkawi

This paper examines the determinants of corporate dividend policy in Jordan. The study uses a firm‐level panel data set of all publicly traded firms on the Amman Stock…

Abstract

This paper examines the determinants of corporate dividend policy in Jordan. The study uses a firm‐level panel data set of all publicly traded firms on the Amman Stock Exchange between 1989 and 2000. The study develops eight research hypotheses, which are used to represent the main theories of corporate dividends. A general‐to‐specific modeling approach is used to choose between the competing hypotheses. The study examines the determinants of the amount of dividends using Tobit specifications. The results suggest that the proportion of stocks held by insiders and state ownership significantly affect the amount of dividends paid. Size, age, and profitability of the firm seem to be determinant factors of corporate dividend policy in Jordan. The findings provide strong support for the agency costs hypothesis and are broadly consistent with the pecking order hypothesis. The results provide no support for the signaling hypothesis.

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Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article

Laurence Booth

Academic research has made remarkable contributions to our knowledge as to how capital markets behave. This research has in turn stimulated changes in the practise of…

Abstract

Academic research has made remarkable contributions to our knowledge as to how capital markets behave. This research has in turn stimulated changes in the practise of finance. From the seminal contributions of Markowitz (1952) and subsequently Sharpe (1964) we have learnt how diversification affects the risk of holding securities. This has stimulated practical innovations in index funds, risk and style based bench‐marking of portfolio performance as well as more precise methods for estimating capital costs. From the contributions of Black and Scholes (1973) we have also learnt how financial and real options can be valued. This in turn provided the necessary condition for the development of the huge market in derivative securities. Who could have issued LYONS, Nikkei puts, bull floaters and caps and collars if Black and Scholes had not first made the key insight that you could value these securities indirectly by creating a risk free portfolio? Finally, from Jensen and Meckling (1976) we have rediscovered the problems of incentive structures, and the importance of “agency” problems. This in turn has stimulated significant changes in the design of financial securities, such as event risk clauses in bonds, to protect against corporate opportunism, as well as providing the intellectual motivation behind the dramatic developments in management and leveraged buyouts. The above developments have been recognised in two Nobel prizes with most probably more to come.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article

Laurence Booth and Jun Zhou

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate how and why a firm’s product market power affects its dividend policy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how and why a firm’s product market power affects its dividend policy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses three measures of market power? The degree of import competition, Herfindahl-Hirschman index, and Lerner Index? To examine how a firm’s product market power affects its dividend policy. Further, it proposes and tests a risk-based explanation for this impact.

Findings

This paper shows that market power positively affects the dividend decision, in terms of both the probability of paying a dividend and the amount of dividend payment. It also provides evidence that the route through which market power affects the dividend decision is business risk: firms with less market power are riskier and hence less likely to pay dividends than firms with more market power.

Practical implications

The results show that product market power may have played an important role in reshaping dividend policy of corporate America.

Originality/value

This study documents the relevance of market power behind dividend policy and therefore adds to the knowledge on the relationship between product markets and corporate financial policies, which is an important and understudied area of corporate finance.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article

Laurence Booth and Sean Cleary

The purpose of this paper is to review the evolution of the Canadian financial environment since the stock market “crash” of 1987.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the evolution of the Canadian financial environment since the stock market “crash” of 1987.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a chronological account of significant events in the Canadian economic environment and capital markets, and how they have transformed the financial climate.

Findings

The late 1980s was a turbulent period with many changes in government and economic policies which were initiated at a time when governments were wracked with fiscal deficits, and just as the central bank appointed a dedicated inflation fighter. These changes worked their way through the system to contribute to one of the worst recessions in Canadian history. One of the symbols of disparity during this era was the Stock Market “Crash” of 1987, which was felt in Canada, as well as around the globe. However, for the last decade, the federal government has reported a surplus every year, and Canadians have benefitted from falling tax rates, declining interest rates, a strong stock market, and a rising currency. In fact, until September of 2008, all of these developments had contributed to unprecedented profitability in the financial services industry, until the recent widespread economic crisis in the US spread to Canadian and global economies. However, the Canadian economy seems much better poised to deal with such adversity than it was in October 1987. If the fall of 2008 is any indication, we will find out soon enough.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates how fallout from the crash of 1987, as well as other subsequent developments, has contributed to significant changes in the financial environment.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

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Book part

Laurence Booth

The value of any course comes from analyzing new institutional arrangements, deepening skills, and new conceptual topics. However, whereas the international finance course…

Abstract

The value of any course comes from analyzing new institutional arrangements, deepening skills, and new conceptual topics. However, whereas the international finance course contributed in all three areas ten to twenty years ago, developments in the MBA curriculum at major schools since then have reduced its value-added. By examining the four key areas of the course – the foreign exchange market, exposure management, funds management, and corporate finance – this paper argues that the topics are now better covered elsewhere, not because they are no longer important but because they have been absorbed into core finance topics, such as financial risk management.

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Leadership in International Business Education and Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-224-5

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Abstract

Details

Leadership in International Business Education and Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-224-5

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Book part

Abstract

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Leadership in International Business Education and Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-224-5

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

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Article

Alan M. Rugman and Alain Verbeke

The capital budgeting decision for a multinational enterprise needs to take into account concepts of business policy and competitive strategy. From the modern theory of…

Abstract

The capital budgeting decision for a multinational enterprise needs to take into account concepts of business policy and competitive strategy. From the modern theory of the multinational enterprise, i.e., the theory of internalisation, it is recognised that proprietary firm specific advantages yield economic rents when exploited on a world‐wide basis. Yet the multinational enterprise finds these potential rents dissipated by internal governance costs of its organisational structure and the difficulty of timing and sustaining its foreign direct investment activities. This paper examines these issues by a focus upon parent‐subsidiary relationships and the strategic nature of the capital budgeting decision for a multinational enterprise.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Book part

Sara E. Green, Rosalyn Benjamin Darling and Loren Wilbers

This chapter reviews qualitative research on parenting children with disabilities published over the last 50 years to explore whether shifts in academic discourse and…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter reviews qualitative research on parenting children with disabilities published over the last 50 years to explore whether shifts in academic discourse and changes in professional training have affected research on parenting and/or the experiences of parents who are the subject of such research.

Methodology/approach

An extensive literature search was conducted, and 78 peer-reviewed, qualitative studies on the experience of parenting a child with a disability were included in the sample. Themes were extracted from the reviewed literature and compared across decades.

Findings

The findings of the present review suggest that some aspects of the parenting experience have changed very little. In particular, parents continue to experience negative reactions such as stress and anomie, especially early in their children’s lives, and socially imposed barriers such as unhelpful professionals, and a lack of needed services continue to create problems and inspire an entrepreneurial response. In addition, stigmatizing encounters with others continue to be a common occurrence. In contrast to earlier decades, studies conducted in more recent years have begun to use the social model of disability as an analytic frame and also increasingly report that parents are questioning and challenging the concept of “normal” itself.

Social/practical implications

Additional improvements are needed in professional education and services to reduce the negative reactions experienced by parents of children with disabilities.

Originality/value of chapter

The findings of this meta-analysis can serve as a guide to future research on parenting children with disabilities.

Details

Disability and Intersecting Statuses
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-157-1

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