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Publication date: 10 October 2006

Laurence B. McCullough

Professional formation and evaluation in medical education lacks a reliable conceptual foundation. This shortcoming results from an insufficient appreciation of the…

Abstract

Professional formation and evaluation in medical education lacks a reliable conceptual foundation. This shortcoming results from an insufficient appreciation of the history of medical ethics as the source of the concept of medicine as a profession. This chapter therefore explores the medical ethics of the Scottish physician-ethicist, John Gregory (1724–1773) and the English physician-ethicist, Thomas Percival (1740–1804), who between them invented the concept of medicine as a profession. Three components of this concept are identified: the commitment to scientific and clinical competence; the commitment to protect the patient's health-related interests; and passing on medicine as public trust, not merchant guild.

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Lost Virtue
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-339-6

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2006

Laurence B. McCullough

Matthew Wynia and his co-authors and Charmers Clark, in their two chapters, take on thorny issues concerning the moral responsibilities of physicians – and, by…

Abstract

Matthew Wynia and his co-authors and Charmers Clark, in their two chapters, take on thorny issues concerning the moral responsibilities of physicians – and, by implication, all health care professionals – regarding preparation for and response to epidemics (Clark, 2006; Wynia, Kurlander, & Green, 2006). Their chapters are especially timely, inasmuch as they address ethical challenges associated with bioterrorism, which, should it occur, could create an epidemic of catastrophic proportions, at least for the locality or localities in which the bioterrorism occurs. In this commentary, I provide a critical assessment of their chapters. I begin with a review of the foundational concept of the Wynia et al. chapter, social-trustee professionalism, and of the Clark chapter, a covenant of public trust. I then take up four issues: the moral demands of social-trustee professionalism and how the social-contract theory of medical ethics advocated by the framers of the 1847 American Medical Association Code of Ethics (American Medical Association, 1847) should be understood; social-role related obligations as ethically-justified limits on fiduciary responsibility in bioterrorism events and how such obligations should be addressed in a preventive ethics fashion by health care organizations; legitimate self-interests as ethically-justified limits on fiduciary responsibility and how such interests should be distinguished from mere self-interests and be addressed in a preventive ethics fashion by health care organizations; and the nature and limits of the standard of care in the large-scale emergencies that bioterrorism events could create.

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Ethics and Epidemics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-412-6

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Book part
Publication date: 10 October 2006

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Lost Virtue
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-339-6

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2006

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Ethics and Epidemics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-412-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1979

In order to succeed in an action under the Equal Pay Act 1970, should the woman and the man be employed by the same employer on like work at the same time or would the…

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In order to succeed in an action under the Equal Pay Act 1970, should the woman and the man be employed by the same employer on like work at the same time or would the woman still be covered by the Act if she were employed on like work in succession to the man? This is the question which had to be solved in Macarthys Ltd v. Smith. Unfortunately it was not. Their Lordships interpreted the relevant section in different ways and since Article 119 of the Treaty of Rome was also subject to different interpretations, the case has been referred to the European Court of Justice.

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Managerial Law, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1938

THIS is the month when librarians and library workers everywhere, their holidays over, turn to their winter plans. There are, however, some interesting events to take…

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THIS is the month when librarians and library workers everywhere, their holidays over, turn to their winter plans. There are, however, some interesting events to take place before the darker and more active months come. The first is the meeting at Oxford on September 21st and subsequent days of the Federation International de Documentation. This will be followed by and merge into the ASLIB Conference, and there is in prospect an attendance of over three hundred. Our readers know that this organization produces and advocates the International Decimal Classification. It is not primarily a “library” society but rather one of abstractors and indexers of material, but it is closely akin, and we hope that English librarianship will be well represented. Then there is a quite important joint‐conference at Lincoln of the Northern Branches of the Library Association on September 30th— October 3rd, which we see is to be opened by the President of the Library Association. Finally the London and Home Counties Branch are to confer at Folkestone from October 14th to 16th, and here, the programme includes Messrs. Jast, Savage, McColvin, Wilks, Carter, and the President will also attend. There are other meetings, and if the question is asked: do not librarians have too many meetings ? we suppose the answer to be that the Association is now so large that local conferences become desirable. One suggestion, that has frequently been made, we repeat. The Library Association should delegate a certain definite problem to each of its branches, asking for a report. These reports should form the basis of the Annual Conference. It is worthy of more consideration.

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New Library World, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Steven H. Appelbaum, Maria Serena and Barbara T. Shapiro

An extensive literature search was conducted to better understand and to dispel the current stereotypes in the workplace regarding Generation X and Baby Boomers. For the…

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An extensive literature search was conducted to better understand and to dispel the current stereotypes in the workplace regarding Generation X and Baby Boomers. For the purpose of the article Generation X consisted of those born between 1961 and 1981, while Baby Boomers consisted of those born between 1943 and 1960. The purpose of this article was to use an exhaustive review of eclectic/multidisciplinary literature to address six commonly held myths presented by Paul and Townsend (1993). Furthermore, it was intended to examine empirical research gathered by a literature review of the stereotypes in the workplace, to better understand the profiles and factors that motivate the Baby Boomers and Generation X, in conjunction with the following independent variables: age, productivity, motivation, training, and mentoring and job satisfaction. Selected hypotheses were tested suggesting Generation Xers are more productive, more motivated, easily trainable and exhibit higher job satisfaction levels as compared to Baby Boomers. Results were convergent and divergent in several cases worth noting. It is important for organizations to recognize the limitations that stereotypes create in the workplace. As was demonstrated by the varied research, Baby Boomers and Generation Xers are not dissimilar as employees; they possess more similarities than differences. Organizations need to engineer/design an environment of respect for both groups to create synergies between them to build and maintain a productive workforce.

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Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Writing just a few years ago in The New York Times Book Review (January 10, 1982), Edwin McDowell, publishing correspondent of the Times, discussed what he termed “The…

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Writing just a few years ago in The New York Times Book Review (January 10, 1982), Edwin McDowell, publishing correspondent of the Times, discussed what he termed “The Paperback Evolution”: the substantive changes in paperback book publishing that had occurred in the nearly half century since the “paperback revolution” of the 1930s, when Robert DeGraff launched his enormously successful Pocket Books line and spawned a host of imitators of not only his products but of his pioneering, entrepreneurial distribution tactics—probably the biggest factor in the success of the Pocket Books line. A little more than three years later, McDowell wrote another column on paperbacks in the NYTBR (September 28, 1985), and this time he entitled his article “Turmoil in the Racks: The Second Paperback Revolution.” What had happened during that brief period that made him see this type of publishing going from “evolutionary” to “revolutionary,” and what implications does such radical change have for the library collection‐building process—if any? For answers to these questions, a look at paperback publishing, particularly mass market, over the last decade or so is in order.

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Collection Building, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Book part
Publication date: 10 October 2006

Nuala Kenny and Wayne Shelton

No topic in medical education has received more attention and generated more discussion in recent years than that of “professionalism”. In many ways, this should come as…

Abstract

No topic in medical education has received more attention and generated more discussion in recent years than that of “professionalism”. In many ways, this should come as no surprise in light of the dramatic technical and scientific advances in medicine, the changing, and often confounding, roles of physicians in complex health care systems, and the growing expectation throughout society that physicians should provide more effective, patient-centered care. Any of these factors alone is sufficient to create anxiety and confusion about basic duties and responsibilities of physicians to patients, the medical profession and to society. In this complex, demanding, commercialized and yet, values-laden, world of health care it is an understatement to say that there are fundamental challenges to what it means to be a medical professional in today's society.

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Lost Virtue
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-339-6

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