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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Lauren Thompson and Paul Kingston

With the increase in the development of treatments that aim to improve the symptoms of dementia, more attention is focussed upon the effect that these treatments have on…

Abstract

With the increase in the development of treatments that aim to improve the symptoms of dementia, more attention is focussed upon the effect that these treatments have on the patient's quality of life (QoL). There are specific challenges to be met in measuring the QoL of a patient who is in the later, more severe, stages of dementia. The main challenge to be met is whether the QoL measure can measure QoL in an individual who is unable to provide a subjective report of his or her own QoL. This paper presents five QoL measures that have been designed or used to measure the QoL of patients with severe dementia who are unable to provide self‐reports and to examine whether these measures are a valid and reliable means of assessing QoL in patients with severe dementia. It was found that all of the QoL measures have moderate to good reliability and validity, but the question still remains that without a subjective account, such as a self‐report from the person with dementia, is the outcome of these QoL measures a true reflection of the patient's QoL?

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Lauren Darby and Heledd Jenkins

The purpose of this paper is to briefly assess social accounting methods and tools to measure business and social enterprise (SE) contributions to sustainability in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to briefly assess social accounting methods and tools to measure business and social enterprise (SE) contributions to sustainability in relation to their usefulness and applicability to SEs. Using a case study example, the paper aims to describe and evaluate the process of developing and applying indicators to measure contributions to sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers worked with three senior members of staff at Wastesavers to develop a set of sustainability indicators. First a literature review of existing sustainability indicator sets and sustainability tools was undertaken. Then a scoping exercise was undertaken to understand what the company wanted out of the process and to decide on which indicators to use. A list on eight key indicators was developed and data on each of these collected and collated and a report was written. Discussion is focussed on the requirements, difficulties, appropriateness and potential pitfalls of such an approach, including commentary on the integration of indicators into working practices, organisational change and strategic development.

Findings

No one method of social accounting has been universally accepted in the UK. This requires greater coordination by those developing such models and a common research agenda on this area for SEs in the UK.

Originality/value

The development of social accounting methods in SE is a relatively new field and undertaking a pilot study such as this is an excellent means of identifying the organisational capacity limits present and identifying the changes that need to take place if such tools are to be developed further.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 33 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Ron Iphofen

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2010

Kay A. Chick, Timothy D. Slekar and Eric P. Charles

This study provides a gender analysis of National Council for the Social Studies Notable Trade picture book selections suitable for the primary grades from the years…

Abstract

This study provides a gender analysis of National Council for the Social Studies Notable Trade picture book selections suitable for the primary grades from the years 2006-2008. The study examines the number of male and female characters and the presence, or absence of, gender stereotypes relative to characters’ personali-ties, occupations, and behaviors. Results indicate a significant difference in the number of male and female characters, with many more male characters represented. Both males and females frequently performed stereotypical jobs or roles, with no books depicting males in lower status jobs than females. In books with only female main characters, some women were able to cross traditional gender lines and demonstrate strong personalities. Of the 17 predetermined behaviors in which characters engaged throughout these books, seven of them showed significant differences between males and females. Males were more likely to participate in sports, fight in battles or demonstrate aggressive behaviors, pursue worthy causes such as heroism, use television/computer/radio, and earn a living. Females were more likely to perform domestic chores and demonstrate affection or emotion.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Nathan Robert Berglund and John Daniel Eshleman

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of ethnic similarity in the audit partner–client manager relationship and its impact on auditor selection and retention decisions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of ethnic similarity in the audit partner–client manager relationship and its impact on auditor selection and retention decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use name matching analysis to infer ethnicity of audit partners and client managers in the US nonprofit reporting environment. The authors examine the degree of ethnic similarity (co-ethnicity) between the two parties and model auditor selection and retention decisions as a function of co-ethnicity. The authors also model reporting attributes as a function of co-ethnicity.

Findings

The authors find that the ethnic similarity between the client manager and their external audit partner is a significant determinant of auditor-client alignment. Specifically, the authors find that clients are more likely to select and retain an audit partner who is ethnically similar to the client manager. The authors find that co-ethnicity is associated with a lowered propensity to issue a going concern opinion to a financially distressed client and an increased occurrence of underreporting of fundraising and administrative expenses.

Research limitations/implications

Taken together, the evidence suggests that ethnic diversity (the opposite of co-ethnicity) in the auditor-client relationship is associated with higher audit quality. These findings are relevant to client managers, audit committees and public accounting firms as they make auditor selection and reporting decisions.

Originality/value

Prior studies have found that co-ethnicity influences the formation and future success of various business partnerships. The auditor-client relationship is a unique setting within the business environment where the two parties must balance their desire to maintain a close relationship with their need to maintain independence. The study is the first to examine the role of ethnicity in the auditor-client relationship.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2012

Lauren D. Arnold and Vetta L. Sanders Thompson

Purpose – To provide an overview of racial/ethnic disparities in human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, HPV vaccination, and cervical cancer on domestic and international…

Abstract

Purpose – To provide an overview of racial/ethnic disparities in human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, HPV vaccination, and cervical cancer on domestic and international levels.

Design/methodology/approach – The literature, cervical cancer prevention guidelines, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention resources were culled to aggregate information on epidemiology, racial/ethnic disparities, and knowledge and attitudes related to HPV, HPV vaccination, and cervical cancer. Original data supplement information about HPV and HPV vaccination knowledge and attitudes.

Findings – Cervical cancer is among the leading causes of female death worldwide, with substantial racial/ethnic and geographic disparities. In the United States, African American and Hispanic women suffer disproportionate cervical cancer incidence and mortality compared to their Caucasian counterparts. Globally, the greatest burden of cervical cancer (and HPV infection) is shouldered by developing regions. Prevention efforts, such as HPV vaccination and adaption of screening programs to resource-poor areas, have the potential to reduce such disparities, but cultural context is critical to successful development and implementation of such interventions.

Research limitations/implications – As this is not a systematic review, but rather a viewpoint on issues related to disparities in cervical cancer, the literature review is not exhaustive.

Practical implications – This chapter provides a context for examining cervical cancer disparities domestically and globally and serves as a starting point for formulating future research.

Originality – This perspective on HPV and cervical cancer presents disparities both within the United States and worldwide. The chapter supplements the literature with new data that provide additional insight into knowledge and attitudes about these health issues.

Details

Health Disparities Among Under-served Populations: Implications for Research, Policy and Praxis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-103-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2018

Lauren Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to explore teachers’ noncompliance with secondary-level standardised literacy testing in Tasmania, Australia, particularly their motivations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore teachers’ noncompliance with secondary-level standardised literacy testing in Tasmania, Australia, particularly their motivations, behaviours and justifications. This paper challenges pervasive views regarding test noncompliance, suggesting a reframing as “advocacy cheating”: noncompliance for purposes of advocating for and supporting students.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used a single case study design, with a simple thematic analysis of the qualitative data. The design enabled data to be collected during one iteration of the examined test regime, with depth of exploration into participants’ experiences and perspectives.

Findings

Findings indicate that small number of participants were engaged in test rule noncompliance at all stages of the testing regime: before, during and following the tests. This paper presents the concept of “advocacy cheating”, illustrated in these data through the motivations presented by participants for their noncompliant actions and the forms of noncompliance used.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size and single site problematise drawing much broader comparisons. The age of the data means that current test processes and requirements have developed. Larger-scale studies might enable identification of ways in which this current regime has and might be improved.

Practical implications

This study’s findings and its focus on the classroom and teacher experience of testing provide insights into a widely debated and publicly important phenomenon.

Originality/value

The concept of “advocacy cheating” provides a newer way of considering and interpreting the range of ways in which teachers implement standardised tests.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Michael J. Dotson, Eva M. Hyatt and Lisa Petty Thompson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the responses of a convenience sample of 65 heterosexual and 64 homosexual respondents to a series of fashion oriented print…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the responses of a convenience sample of 65 heterosexual and 64 homosexual respondents to a series of fashion oriented print advertisements depicting overt or ambiguous gay male or lesbian themes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based upon the survey responses of a group of heterosexual and homosexual university students enrolled at three universities in the southeastern United States. Advertisements selected for inclusion in the study were drawn from magazines that target this group. One advertisement representing each level of homosexual content (overtly gay male, overtly lesbian, ambiguously gay male, ambiguously lesbian) as well as one heterosexual advertisement were used in the study in a within subjects design. Paired t‐tests were used to compare mean Abrand and Aad responses across various groups.

Findings

Attitude toward the ad and before‐after exposure toward the brand were compared in male and female heterosexual and homosexual respondents. Results show that heterosexual males and females prefer less overt gay male and lesbian depictions, while gay males and lesbians prefer more overt depictions of themselves, particularly gay male imagery.

Research limitations/implications

This study examines the responses of one specific segment of the gay and lesbian population: traditional‐aged university students. Characters portrayed in the advertisements were also young people and do not represent the inherent diversity in this population. It would be desirable, therefore, to extend this study to an investigation of the broader gay and lesbian population.

Practical implications

Implications for marketers of fashion products suggest that effectual character depictions in fashion advertisements vary by both gender and sexual orientation.

Originality/value

This paper represents a cross‐sectional examination of heterosexual and homosexual responses to a series of fashion advertisements in the United States and provides useful insights to marketers of fashion products.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2022

Kwang-Hwee Cheng

This article presents a study of the trademark lawsuits in Singapore involving the Polo/Lauren Company, L.P. (“PRL”) in their attempts to stop various competitors and…

Abstract

Purpose

This article presents a study of the trademark lawsuits in Singapore involving the Polo/Lauren Company, L.P. (“PRL”) in their attempts to stop various competitors and businesses from using the word “polo” and/or a device of a polo player. Hitherto, there has not been any concerted study of these lawsuits that seeks to analyse the legal principles underpinning the case judgements and translate them into actionable marketing insights using both legal and marketing perspectives. Applying both of such perspectives through the domains of trademark law, consumer attitudes towards counterfeiting and marketing perspectives, such as targeting, promotion and pricing strategies, this article will distill practical and managerial implications for marketers in the luxury brand industry.

Design/methodology/approach

An interdisciplinary approach is adopted, using both legal and marketing frameworks to analyse the decisions, reasoning and implications from the PRL trademark lawsuits.

Findings

There are key practical considerations for marketers and luxury brand managers to consider, both at the conception and during the life cycle of the luxury brand, in order to optimise the level of legal protection under the trademark regime. These include the use of invented words and imaginary content in trademarks, exercising a balancing of various considerations in the use of “composite marks”, and the selection of market pricing, promotion and distribution strategies, which are elaborated in the article.

Research limitations/implications

Given the commonality of the subject matter involved in the trademark lawsuits involving PRL (i.e. the use of the word “polo” and/or the device of a polo player), this study has chosen to focus only on these lawsuits in the context of the Singapore market, and based on Singapore's legal framework, to glean thematic and practical insights. Further studies based on other types of businesses, geographical markets and legal frameworks could be explored to form a better basis for the applicability and comparability of the findings.

Originality/value

While there have been case studies and analyses performed on some of the individual PRL trademark lawsuits around the world, this will be the first study to look at the series of Singapore PRL lawsuits in a holistic and interdisciplinary perspective.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2011

Erica D. McCray

In this phenomenological study, the experiences of seven Black women faculty at predominantly White institutions (PWIs) who are working toward tenure and promotion are…

Abstract

In this phenomenological study, the experiences of seven Black women faculty at predominantly White institutions (PWIs) who are working toward tenure and promotion are presented. The use of phenomenology, specifically in-depth interviews, gives voice to the women as they share the essence of their experiences including their perceived supports and barriers. Understanding their experiences adds to the literature on women of color in education and has the implications for schooling and community, and support structures essential to the success of Black women and all women of color in academe.

Details

Women of Color in Higher Education: Turbulent Past, Promising Future
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-169-5

1 – 10 of 173