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Article

Lauren J. Davenport, Amanda F. Allisey, Kathryn M. Page, Anthony D. LaMontagne and Nicola J. Reavley

Benefits of positive mental health have been demonstrated across work and non-work domains. Individuals reporting positive mental health experience better work…

Abstract

Purpose

Benefits of positive mental health have been demonstrated across work and non-work domains. Individuals reporting positive mental health experience better work performance, better social relationships and better physical health. Additionally, positive work environments can contribute to employee mental health. The purpose of this paper is to develop “expert” consensus regarding practical, actionable strategies that organisations can implement to promote positive mental health in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

A Delphi consensus method was used to establish expert consensus on strategies to promote positive workplace mental health. A 278-item questionnaire was developed and strategies were rated over three survey rounds by two panels comprising 36 workplace mental health practitioners and 36 employer representatives and employees (27 and 9, respectively), employees with experience of promoting positive mental health and well-being in the workplace (total – 72 panellists).

Findings

In total, 220/278 strategies were rated as essential or important by at least 80 per cent of both panels. Endorsed strategies covered the topics of: mental health and well-being strategy, work environment that promotes positive mental health, positive leadership styles, effective communication, designing jobs for positive mental health, recruitment and selection, supporting and developing employees, work-life balance, and positive mental health and well-being initiatives.

Originality/value

The guidelines arising from this study represent expert consensus on what is currently appropriate for promoting positive mental health at work from the perspectives of workplace mental health practitioners, employers and employees, and constitute a resource for translating the growing body of knowledge in this area into policy and practice.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Book part

Julie McColl and Elaine L. Ritch

By the end of this chapter, you should be able to demonstrate an understanding of:The importance of big data in the information revolution.The resource-based view of the…

Abstract

By the end of this chapter, you should be able to demonstrate an understanding of:

The importance of big data in the information revolution.

The resource-based view of the firm and dynamic capabilities as they relate to big data.

The use of big data in marketing decisions.

Consumer security concerns over the storage and processing of big data.

Details

New Perspectives on Critical Marketing and Consumer Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-554-2

Keywords

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Article

latifa Oufkir and Ismail Kassou

This paper aims to propose a model for measuring the performance of knowledge management (KM) projects in enterprises. No such model has been proposed in the literature…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a model for measuring the performance of knowledge management (KM) projects in enterprises. No such model has been proposed in the literature thus far. The activities, factors and outcomes of KM are the main constructs of the model. Their operationalization and interactions are investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted of 120 respondents from SME firms in Morocco. A structural equation modeling (SEM) technique called partial least squares (PLS) was used to assess the validity of the constructs and verify the hypotheses. A performance index for KM projects was derived from the model constructs.

Findings

The results support the model designed for KM activities and related interactions. The effects of KM activities on its outcomes are significant as well. The results also confirm that KM factors are predictors of KM activities and that the effects of these are significant. Furthermore, a performance importance analysis (importance performance map analysis [IPMA]) was performed on the data to expand the results of the PLS-SEM by identifying under-performing KM drivers that require managerial action.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to propose a generic performance measurement model for KM projects. Additionally, it is a pioneering study in the use of IPMA for KM performance measurement.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article

Clive Trusson, Donald Hislop and Neil F. Doherty

This paper responds to a recent trend towards reifying “knowledge hoarding” for purposes of quantitative/deductive research, via a study of information technology (IT…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper responds to a recent trend towards reifying “knowledge hoarding” for purposes of quantitative/deductive research, via a study of information technology (IT) service professionals. A “rhetorical theory” lens is applied to reconsider “knowledge hoarding” as a value-laden rhetoric that directs managers towards addressing assumed worker dysfunctionality.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study of practicing IT service professionals (assumed within IT service management “best practice” to be inclined to hoard knowledge) was conducted over a 34-day period. Twenty workers were closely observed processing IT service incidents, and 26 workers were interviewed about knowledge-sharing practices.

Findings

The study found that IT service practice is characterized more by pro-social collegiality in sharing knowledge/know-how than by self-interested strategic knowledge concealment.

Research limitations/implications

The study concerns a single occupational context. The study indicates that deductive research that reifies “knowledge hoarding” as a naturally occurring phenomenon is flawed, with clear implications for future research.

Practical implications

The study suggests that management concern for productivity might be redirected away from addressing assumed knowledge-hoarding behaviour and towards encouraging knowledge sharing via social interaction in the workplace.

Originality/value

Previous studies have not directly examined the concept of knowledge hoarding using qualitative methods, nor have they considered it as a rhetorical device.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Mixed-Race in the US and UK: Comparing the Past, Present, and Future
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-554-2

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Article

Iolanda D'Amato and Thanos Papadimitriou

The increase in international trade, the advances in technology, the growing importance of the emerging markets are the main factors that have contributed to the explosion…

Abstract

Purpose

The increase in international trade, the advances in technology, the growing importance of the emerging markets are the main factors that have contributed to the explosion of counterfeiting experienced in recent years, estimated to be valued at about 5-7 per cent of the world trade. The luxury industry in Italy has been particularly hard hit and most brands nowadays are urgently looking for demand-side and supply-side strategies to track and control the phenomenon. The aim of this paper is to provide a supply chain view of counterfeiting and illegitimate trade phenomena, in a supply chain risk management perspective, to define and illuminate the interaction of the legitimate and the illegitimate supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces the LISC model to represent and include all the illegitimate trade phenomena under analysis such as pure counterfeiting, factory overruns, grey and parallel market, supply chain infiltrations, product diversion and sale of stolen goods

Findings

The interrelations between legitimate and illegitimate supply chains are crucial to approach counterfeiting issue and define which illegitimate trade paths are more harmful to companies and customers.

Research limitations/implications

The first limitation of the work is that the illegitimate trade categories defined in this paper mainly rely on data and phenomena collected from secondary sources that have not yet been directly observed by the authors. The second one is that a specific focus on high-end fashion industry was employed throughout this work: further analysis for evaluating the applicability and the significance of the illegitimate trade in other industries is still pending. The final limitation stems from the fact that it will be necessary to investigate the implications and the applicability of the model to the illegitimate on-line trade.

Practical implications

During the course of the MI-FIDO project, the model and the selection rules identified for illegitimate trade family classification were used as a basis for defining the rules for anomalies detection to be included in a “track and trace” system developed the project team currently under with a major Italian fashion brand.

Originality/value

To the authors ' knowledge, this is the first work that attempts to present a concise and systematic approach to luxury illegitimate trade from a supply chain perspective. Understanding which legitimate-illegitimate supply chain interactions are the most damaging will help fashion luxury and other industries to battle the counterfeiting phenomenon more effectively

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 41 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Susan S. Fiorito, Eleanor G. May and Katherine Straughn

Defines and discusses quick response (QR), with its relationship tovendor partnering, short‐cycle manufacturing, demand‐flow manufacturing,“virtual integration”…

Abstract

Defines and discusses quick response (QR), with its relationship to vendor partnering, short‐cycle manufacturing, demand‐flow manufacturing, “virtual integration”, re‐engineering, just‐in‐time and efficient consumer response as an introduction to the results of a study on which firms are implementing QR and at what stage they are regarding their implementation strategy. The results of the study show that 73 per cent of the responding retailers claimed to be implementing some phase of QR. Implementation is slow, however, with only two of 15 QR components reported to be as much as half‐implemented among the retail respondents.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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