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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2024

Gaby Probst and Laura Zizka

Higher education institutions (HEIs) seek innovative approaches to attract students. Since the COVID-19 pandemic, many HEIs have considered diversification through digitalization…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education institutions (HEIs) seek innovative approaches to attract students. Since the COVID-19 pandemic, many HEIs have considered diversification through digitalization. From the initial urgency to implement technology at the start of the pandemic to a gradual acceptance over time, HEIs witnessed a shift in perceptions. This paper aims to explore the evolution of the use of technology in HEI classrooms from pre- to post-Covid-19 as seen through the eyes of students and faculty members.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven surveys were conducted from March 2020 to January 2023 with faculty members and students at one business HEI in Switzerland. This longitudinal study analyzed the perceptions of faculty and students regarding technology in the ever-changing HEI environments. These results have been used to make practical recommendations for future HEI classroom settings.

Findings

The findings reveal that the social aspect must be considered when implementing technology into HEIs. Faculty members and students need appropriate training and adequate resources to engage with the technology in and outside the classroom. The results suggest that one result of the pandemic was a greater acceptance of blended learning practices in traditional business education.

Originality/value

The pandemic has left long-lasting effects on teaching and learning. While many HEIs revert to traditional ways, the authors suggest the need to embrace technology that encourages engagement and authentic teaching and learning. HEIs must listen to their faculty members and students, to create more innovative learning environments.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Doreen McGunagle and Laura Zizka

One of the goals of educational institutions is to prepare their graduates to be workplace-ready. The purpose of this paper is to identify the employability skills lacking in the…

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Abstract

Purpose

One of the goals of educational institutions is to prepare their graduates to be workplace-ready. The purpose of this paper is to identify the employability skills lacking in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) industry from employers' perspectives to assist STEM educational institutions in creating more relevant programs inclusive of employability skills.

Design/methodology/approach

This study addresses 16 job-specific skills based on data deriving from the responses of 250 Human Resource Managers (HRMs) who represent five manufacturing industries (Aerospace and Defense, Automotive, Consumer Products, Electronics and Industrial Manufacturing) located in five regions (Northeast, Midwest, Southeast, West-Mountain and Pacific) of the United States.

Findings

The median scores for all 16 skills confirmed their importance for employability in the five manufacturing industries. The five highest ranking skills were team player, self-motivation, verbal communication, problem-solving and being proactive, which align with previous studies on workplace skills.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is a call to all STEM educational institution stakeholders, both internal and external, to re-assess current curriculum and programs and collaborate to narrow the gap between graduate competencies and the practical needs of the workplace.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to bridge the gap between the competencies gained in STEM educational institutions and the competencies needed for the future workplace, as confirmed by HRM professionals. Although this study is focused on STEM educational institutions in the United States, it will be of interest to all STEM educational institutions worldwide who play a significant role in preparing the next generation of employees for the global workplace.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Laura Zizka and Gaby Probst

With the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe in March 2020, higher education institutions (HEIs) worldwide were confronted with creating online courses to complete the…

550

Abstract

Purpose

With the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe in March 2020, higher education institutions (HEIs) worldwide were confronted with creating online courses to complete the semester. While emphasizing positive elements such as flexibility and innovative solutions, the literature focused on numerous faculty problems such as online fatigue, emotional well-being and stress. This paper aims to explore faculty perceptions of teaching during the exceptional circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Two surveys, in the first week and at the end of the semester, were conducted at a business school in Switzerland via the program Lima. A total of 19 faculty members participated in the survey. Of the participants, 56.7% responded in the first survey and 70.9% responded in the second.

Findings

The findings revealed that the faculty’s impressions of their online courses remained positive. The most significant issue cited was time. According to faculty estimations, more than ten additional hours per week were spent preparing for online courses. Nonetheless, many faculty members reported interest in continuing online practices in their future courses.

Practical implications

The COVID-19 pandemic pushed HEIs to embrace the digital revolution while teaching in a competence-oriented mode. However, moving forward, HEIs must mitigate the long-term effects by careful planning and evaluating their digital readiness as an institution and offering training for their faculty and students when necessary.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the existing literature by analyzing one stakeholder group, i.e. faculty members, and their perceptions of teaching during a worldwide pandemic.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2022

Laura Zizka and Gaby Probst

In March 2020, higher education institutions (HEIs) were obliged to complete the semester online because of the COVID-19 pandemic. In the semesters that followed, HEIs reopened…

Abstract

Purpose

In March 2020, higher education institutions (HEIs) were obliged to complete the semester online because of the COVID-19 pandemic. In the semesters that followed, HEIs reopened and closed again because of new waves of the pandemic. While flexibility was lauded, previous literature cited student problems such as lack of motivation and social contact. This study aims to explore students' perceptions of learning during four exceptional semesters.

Design/methodology/approach

Five surveys were conducted via the program LimeSurvey during the online courses at one business school in Switzerland: April 2020, June 2020, December 2020, June 2021 and December 2021. The participation varied between 56% (April and June 2020), 52% (December 2020), 47.5% (June 2021) and 42.4% (December 2021).

Findings

The results of this longitudinal study were analyzed to examine the consequences of “forced” online learning. The analysis reveals that although the students appreciate the usefulness of the learning experience, their motivation decreased. The historic crisis has underlined sudden technological changes in the learning programs that have had multiple (adverse) effects on students' learning.

Originality/value

Based on the results, this study concludes that students have mixed perceptions regarding the learning environments (traditional, hybrid or blended) moving forward. Whatever the choice, HEIs must carefully plan the most effective teaching/learning environment to ensure that students remain engaged. This study reveals the links and interconnections in this complex online setting called “learning” based on four semesters of urgent remote learning and one semester of hybrid face-to-face courses.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Laura Zizka

This paper aims to discuss how the hospitality industry is communicating corporate social responsibility (CSR) to its stakeholders, the premise being CSR communication through…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss how the hospitality industry is communicating corporate social responsibility (CSR) to its stakeholders, the premise being CSR communication through social media platforms will increase stakeholder engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is developed based on Schwartz and Carroll’s three-domain approach to CSR motivation, stakeholder theory and a synthesis of previous literature of CSR communication in the hospitality industry.

Findings

Successful communication through social media is based on two-way participative dialogue. Companies, especially the hospitality industry, have used social media to communicate information through social media in a one-way direction, that of giving information. One example is the communication of CSR actions and intentions as found on hospitality websites, intranets and social media platforms. While previous studies have shown a link between CSR communication through social media and corporate reputation, few studies have examined CSR communication through social media and its effects on specific stakeholder groups.

Research limitations/implications

Rather than assuming that CSR communication can be done successfully through a “one-size-fits-all” social media discourse, this paper suggests the need for specific messages and potentially different communication channels to increase engagement from each of the various stakeholders in the hospitality industry.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers which tries to address how one communication channel, social media, can affect CSR communication and increase stakeholder engagement in the hospitality industry. This paper provides discussion on the usefulness of social media to communicate CSR messages and posits the need for future research projects on a macro and micro level.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Marc Stierand and Laura Zizka

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on hospitality management education from a “practice epistemology” and discuss how a connecting of savoir (theoretical knowledge or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on hospitality management education from a “practice epistemology” and discuss how a connecting of savoir (theoretical knowledge or “knowing”), savoir-faire (knowing how to do tasks, i.e. task-related skills) and savoir-être (knowing how to be, i.e. behavior) can develop into practical knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose of the paper is achieved through novel reading of the literature on practical knowledge and formativeness applied to a higher education context.

Findings

The paper suggests that it is only through the creation of context that a sensation of practicing for students can be provided, which ultimately may lead to practical knowledge. Context must be actively created through situations that invite participation to explore the logic of practice. Therefore, savoir should be treated as “organizing knowing” and savoir-faire and savoir-être as “practicing knowing” to do and to be, respectively. The terms savoir, savoir-faire and savoir-être were chosen for this paper, as they were the common reference terms used in hospitality (master-) apprenticeship systems in Europe.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is a personal reflection on a practice epistemology for hospitality management education from the perspective of two academic faculty members who have been practitioners in the hospitality industry and who regularly teach hospitality executives.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2023

Senthilkumaran Piramanayagam, Jyothi Mallya and Valsaraj Payini

Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) is a method intended to create awareness, knowledge, competence and attitude amongst stakeholders towards Sustainable Development Goals…

Abstract

Purpose

Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) is a method intended to create awareness, knowledge, competence and attitude amongst stakeholders towards Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through higher education curricula. This bibliometric analysis, coupled with a systematic review, presents a comprehensive and objective assessment of the evolution of Sustainability in Hospitality Education (SHE) literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This study integrated two review techniques: a systematic review and bibliometric analysis of peer-reviewed scientific articles published in journals indexed in Scopus. This study discloses the research landscape and thematic evaluation of the structure of existing literature on SHE.

Findings

The results show that SHE is an emerging field comprised of five main themes. The themes that emerged were SHE and perspectives, sustainability and curriculum, implications of sustainability education (SE), sustainability and learning and sustainability, students' perception and literacy.The authors' study findings also revealed that SHE is imbalanced and scarce in developing countries.

Practical implications

This systematic review, integrated with a bibliometric analysis, indicates that SHE is an emerging field. The findings offer a broadened perspective on scholarly research on the concept, current trends and future research direction.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study is the first study that attempts to uncover various research themes of SHE literature. The authors' work also acts as an entry point for critical conceptual ideas and empirical discoveries of SHE research. The study findings are helpful for future researchers in the SHE domain.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Ahmet Bulent Ozturk

569

Abstract

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Content available
913

Abstract

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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