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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Laura Woods, Laura Craster and Andrew Forrester

There are high levels of psychiatric morbidity amongst people in prisons. In England and Wales, prisoners who present with the most acute mental health needs can be…

Abstract

Purpose

There are high levels of psychiatric morbidity amongst people in prisons. In England and Wales, prisoners who present with the most acute mental health needs can be transferred to hospital urgently under part III of the Mental Health Act 1983. This project reviewed all such transfers within one region of England, with an emphasis on differences across levels of security.

Design/methodology/approach

Over a six-year period (2010–2016) within one region of England, 930 psychiatric referrals were received from seven male prisons. From these referrals, 173 (18.5%) secure hospital transfers were required. Diagnostic and basic demographic information were analysed, along with hospital security categorisation (high secure, medium secure, low secure, psychiatric intensive care unit and other) and total time to transfer in days.

Findings

There were substantial delays to urgent hospital transfer across all levels of hospital security. Prisoners were transferred to the following units: medium security (n = 98, 56.9%); psychiatric intensive care units (PICUs) (n = 34, 19.7%); low secure conditions (n = 20, 11.6%); high secure conditions (n = 12, 6.9%); other (n = 9, 5.2%). Mean transfer times were as follows: high secure = 159.6 days; other = 68.8 days; medium secure = 58.6 days; low secure = 54.8 days; and psychiatric intensive care = 16.1 days.

Research limitations/implications

In keeping with the wider literature in this area, transfers of prisoners to hospital were very delayed across all levels of secure psychiatric hospital care. Mean transfer times were in breach of the national 14-day timescale, although transfers to PICUs were quicker than to other units. National work, including research and service pilots, is required to understand whether and how these transfer times might be improved.

Originality/value

This paper extends the available literature on the topic of transferring prisoners with mental illness who require compulsory treatment. There is a small but developing literature in this area, and this paper largely confirms that delays to hospital transfer remain a serious problem in England and Wales. National work, including research and service pilots, is required to understand whether and how these transfer times might be improved. This could include different referral and transfer models as a component of service-based and pathways research or combining referral pathways across units to improve their efficacy.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Laura Wood, Ryan Snelgrove, Julie Legg, Marijke Taks and Luke R. Potwarka

Hosting events can attract visitors to an area and provide an opportunity for local businesses in the host community to benefit economically. Restaurants, in particular…

Abstract

Purpose

Hosting events can attract visitors to an area and provide an opportunity for local businesses in the host community to benefit economically. Restaurants, in particular, have an opportunity to benefit as food is a necessary expenditure. However, previous research suggests that the intentional attraction of event visitors by local businesses has been minimal. The purpose of this paper is to explore perspectives of event leveraging held by restaurant owners/managers and a destination marketing organization (DMO).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with owners/managers of 16 local restaurants and from three DMO executives in one medium-sized city in Ontario, Canada. Data were analyzed using initial and axial coding.

Findings

Findings indicate that restaurants did not engage in event leveraging. Three common reasons emerged to explain their lack of engagement in leveraging, including: a lack of a belief in benefits from leveraging, inconvenient proximity to event venue, and not being prepared for event leveraging opportunities. The DMO had a desire to assist local business in leveraging, but their ability to do so was negatively impacted by a lack of awareness of events being hosted, disengagement by local businesses, and limited resources.

Originality/value

Findings suggest that there is a need for DMOs and local businesses to create stronger and more supportive working relationships that address financial and human resources constraints preventing the adoption and success of event leveraging. As part of this approach there is a need for cities to make stronger financial investments in supportive agencies such as a DMO.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2020

Luke R. Potwarka, Ryan Snelgrove, Laura Wood, Georgia Teare and Daniel Wigfield

The purpose of this study was to examine whether watching a live track cycling event could increase youths' intention to participate in the sport, and to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine whether watching a live track cycling event could increase youths' intention to participate in the sport, and to identify cognitive and affective mechanisms associated with post-event intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of youth spectators (n = 362) who experienced the 2016 Milton International Track Cycling Challenge completed pre- and post-event questionnaires to assess intention to participate and cognitive and affective components of their spectator experience.

Findings

Respondents' intentions to participate post-event were significantly higher than pre-event. Results also indicated that state inspiration mediated relationships between three cognitive dimensions of sport spectator experiences (i.e. fantasy, flow, evaluation) and intention to participate.

Practical implications

Sport managers should design youth day events to engage with youth prior to the event to increase their knowledge of the sport. This prior engagement may help youth to evaluate performances effectively. Moreover, event experience should be designed to incorporate vicarious and immersive experiences tailored to youth spectators.

Originality/value

The present study is one of the first to assess intentions to participate among youth spectators at multiple time points (i.e. before and after an event) and identifies specific mechanism within the spectator experience that may lead to a demonstration effect.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Hannah Bonner

This chapter investigates the recent surge of social media (mis)use in horror films including The Cabin in the Woods (2012), Unfriended (2015) and #Horror (2015) and how…

Abstract

This chapter investigates the recent surge of social media (mis)use in horror films including The Cabin in the Woods (2012), Unfriended (2015) and #Horror (2015) and how young women’s relationship to social media in these films often pillories females for existing under, and delighting in, an anonymous, ubiquitous gaze. In these narratives, women are slut shamed both in the plot and through the threat of social media’s panoply of screens, sur- and selfveillance. In my discussion, I will utilize feminist film theory including the writings of Laura Mulvey, Linda Williams and Barbara Creed, while also including contemporary cultural criticism from writers and journalists like Nancy Jo Sales and Leora Tanenbaum to explore the horror genre from a more contemporary, multi-discourse perspective. The technology in these films serve as harbingers, intimating the figurative and literal dangers to come for their female protagonists, ultimately suggesting that the horror in these films is the medium itself and the patriarchal social media culture that these devices cultivate.

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Film
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-898-7

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Patricia Cairns, Barry Quinn, Nicholas Alexander and Anne Marie Doherty

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role played by leadership in divestment decision making and indeed during the corporate restructuring phase for retail…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role played by leadership in divestment decision making and indeed during the corporate restructuring phase for retail organisations. In doing so, the paper aims to contribute to a growing body of research that seeks to develop understanding of the factors leading to retail divestment and the nature of corporate response to divestment.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case approach is utilised. The cases are selected from a database of international retail divestment activity over a longitudinal period.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that divestment can be a response to “failure”, however, support is also provided for the assertion that divestment can be a strategic decision to devote resources more efficiently elsewhere, either at home or abroad. A key finding is the role of leadership and managerial stability in relation to divestment and restructuring at home and abroad.

Research limitations/implications

The themes presented in this paper are developed from observational data. The validity of the themes should be examined further through in‐depth, qualitative case studies of divestment activity. Future research could examine the role of new CEOs both in relation to the divestment itself and during the process of restructuring following divestment.

Practical implications

The role of leadership and managerial stability in divestment and corporate restructuring processes are highlighted. Insights are provided into the organisational response to divestment actions and the implications for further international strategies.

Originality/value

Academic debate on divestment has highlighted a wide range of reasons that lead to retailers divesting international operations and the strategic value of divestment. This paper adds to existing knowledge by examining the role of leadership within the divestment process.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Laura A. Liswood

Service track records can help customers and analysts evaluate a company's products as well as its value. The author shows how most corporations can be held accountable…

Abstract

Service track records can help customers and analysts evaluate a company's products as well as its value. The author shows how most corporations can be held accountable for their level of service quality.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Laura Bravi, Federica Murmura, Gilberto Santos, Luca Tomassini and Alessio Gnaccarini

This study aims to analyze the innovations introduced, with reference to enterprise resource planning, in the Italian wood–furniture sector, focusing attention on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze the innovations introduced, with reference to enterprise resource planning, in the Italian wood–furniture sector, focusing attention on the COSMOB S.p.A. case study, identifying how this small company tried to exploit the advantages offered by the introduction of new digital technologies to remain competitive in the context of the accredited Test Laboratories in the furniture industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The research has been developed with a qualitative approach. The study is a conceptual development and it uses exploratory interviews to create a single case study of COSMOB. The case study was developed with the realization by the researcher of a long period of support to the company’s Quality Manager, and periodic bi-monthly interviews for an update of their perceptions on the development of the activity.

Findings

The need for rapid decision-making processes, the management of high volumes of data and the need for inter- and intra-organizational connection had a critical relief in company’s decision to adopt the integrated software. As for the main problems related to its adoption, these were the duration of the implementation of the operation, the complexity of the system and its limited adaptability.

Originality/value

The value of the paper relies on the development of an in-depth company case study, where the researcher supported the implementation of the system for the entire activity, obtaining therefore, a qualitative base of information that cannot be obtained through limited interviews.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 December 2017

Federica Murmura and Laura Bravi

In the world economy there is the emergence of advanced manufacturing technologies that are enabling more cost and resource-efficient small-scale production. Among them…

Abstract

Purpose

In the world economy there is the emergence of advanced manufacturing technologies that are enabling more cost and resource-efficient small-scale production. Among them, additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, is leading companies to rethink where and how they conduct their manufacturing activities. The purpose of this paper is to focus in the Italian wood-furniture industry to understand if the companies in this sector are investing in additive manufacturing techniques, to remain competitive in their reference markets. The research also attempts to investigate the potential sustainable benefits and limitations to the implementation of 3D printing in this specific sector, considering the companies that have already implemented this technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a structured questionnaire survey performed on a sample of 234 Italian companies in this sector; 76 companies claimed to use 3D printing in their production system. The questionnaire was distributed via computer-assisted web interviewing and it consisted of four sections.

Findings

The research has highlighted how Italian 3D companies have a specific profile; they are companies aimed at innovating through the search for new products and product features, putting design and Made in Italy in the first place. They pay high attention to the image they communicate to the market and are highly oriented to the final customer, and to the satisfaction of its needs.

Originality/value

The study is attempting to expand a recent and unexplored research line on the possible advantages and disadvantages of the implementation of emerging production technologies such as 3D printing.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Amy Segal

The author uses a novel narrative style to detail the stories of two women coming to feminism and the impact organizational experiences have had on their gender awareness…

Abstract

The author uses a novel narrative style to detail the stories of two women coming to feminism and the impact organizational experiences have had on their gender awareness. Frames these two stories by detailing her own journey in becoming a feminist. Together the stories bear witness to the importance of organizational experiences in shaping their identities, specifically in relationship to their awareness of gender, and conversely how their identities in turn affect the way we approach and make sense of their lives inside and beyond organizations.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Gilberto Santos, Federica Murmura and Laura Bravi

This paper aims to present a model developed by an Italian company, Gamma, that produces technologically high-precision components, with the objectives of defining a model…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a model developed by an Italian company, Gamma, that produces technologically high-precision components, with the objectives of defining a model of vendor rating to improve companies’ management and quality within the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The research has been developed through a qualitative approach, based on a longitudinal single case study. Two semi-structured interviews have been carried out with the company’s Quality Manager in September 23 and October 31, 2016. Relevant secondary data were also used, such as company reports and their website.

Findings

Owing to the implementation of the Gamma model, the company is committed to the prudent selection of its partners and in establishing lasting relationships of mutual benefit with them. The termination of the relationship with suppliers is therefore rare; monitoring periods and improvement of suppliers are preferred. The Gamma model and its suppliers jointly undertake corrective actions that have to be implemented within a defined time frame.

Practical implications

Establishing criteria for an objective evaluation of suppliers could be directly or indirectly related to the quality of the final product, and greatly affects the same. This model has been effective for the identification of less performing suppliers that have to be subjected to improvement and audit plans.

Originality/value

This model allows the assignment of penalties or rewards, identifies which suppliers to direct audits and improvement plans, with which to end the relationship and with which to establish a relationship of integration and direct involvement.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

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