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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Laura E. Marler, Susie S. Cox, Marcia J. Simmering, Bryan L. Rogers and Curtis F. Matherne

Information sharing is vital to organizational operations, yet employees are often reluctant to share negative information. This paper aims to gain insight into which…

Abstract

Purpose

Information sharing is vital to organizational operations, yet employees are often reluctant to share negative information. This paper aims to gain insight into which employees will be reluctant to share negative information and when by drawing from the proactive motivation literature examining effects of proactive personality and motivational states on individuals’ willingness to share negative information.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional design was used, with data collected from a final sample of 393 individuals via an online survey. Hypotheses were tested using correlation and hierarchical multiple regression analyses.

Findings

Interactive effects indicate proactive individuals with accompanying high levels of role breadth self-efficacy (“can do”) or high levels of felt responsibility for constructive change (“reason to”) were less likely to be reluctant to share negative information. However, findings also suggest proactive individuals with lower levels of proactive motivation avoid sharing negative information.

Originality/value

The findings extend what is known about personality factors and employee willingness to share information to highlight which employees may be likely to avoid sharing negative information. The authors also examine the moderating influence of proactive motivational states on the relationships between proactive personality and reluctance to share negative information.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Taewoo Kim and Laura Marler

Possible asymmetric treatment among family members has long been neglected in the field of family firm research. To fill this gap, the purpose of this study is to shed…

Abstract

Purpose

Possible asymmetric treatment among family members has long been neglected in the field of family firm research. To fill this gap, the purpose of this study is to shed light on the heterogeneity of treatment of family members in family firms by proposing factors that influence the likelihood of bifurcation bias among “family” members.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon social identity theory and the concept of bifurcation bias, the authors theorize that family members working in family firms are not a homogenous entity, but rather a heterogeneous entity contingent on their status and/or position in the family. To provide a comprehensive understanding of heterogeneous treatment among family members, both individual factors and societal factors should be considered.

Findings

Blood relatedness of family members is suggested as an important determinant of the likelihood of bifurcation bias among family members. It is also proposed that the impact of blood relatedness is likely influenced by both individual factors (familial proximity and familial tenure) and a societal factor (collectivism).

Originality/value

Theorizing takes a step forward to advance the understanding of interpersonal dynamics in family firms. In particular, this article expands the research boundaries of family business research by taking into account that not all “family” members are treated preferentially. Moreover, this article deepens our understanding of the nature and status of non-blood related family members by unveiling the influence of both individual and societal factors. This article also provides a theoretical foundation for human resource management (HRM) research in family businesses by addressing bifurcation bias among family members.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 January 2018

Emily Marett, Laura Marler and Kent Marett

One of the key characteristics that distinguishes the family business from other firms is the importance of accruing and maintaining socioemotional wealth (SEW). Using an…

Abstract

Purpose

One of the key characteristics that distinguishes the family business from other firms is the importance of accruing and maintaining socioemotional wealth (SEW). Using an experimental design, this exploratory study investigates the communication practices of family business leaders responding to employees responsible for a business disruption. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether managers take action to protect SEW while responding to a crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

Three employees of a family firm participated in the experiment. A family member employee and a non-family employee were instructed to write a message informing a family member leader of a business disruption they created (infecting a computer with malware). The family member leader then received these messages and wrote a response to each employee. These responses were then content analyzed to determine whether messages expressed SEW importance and to see if SEW content differed based on the recipient’s familial status.

Findings

Content analysis of messages intended for family members and non-family employees indicated that messages intended for family members contain significantly different content associated with dimensions of Socioemotional Wealth Importance scale, particularly in terms of reinforcing family dominance, sustaining family continuity, and maintaining family enrichment.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine crisis communication within the family firm and whether SEW endowment occurs via internal communication within the family firm. By utilizing an experiment, this study extends the SEW literature further by adding to the diversity of techniques utilized to study this topic.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Christopher Penney, James Vardaman, Laura Marler and Victoria Antin-Yates

Research suggests family businesses often pursue risky or aggressive strategies despite the desire to preserve socioemotional wealth (SEW), which is thought to lead to…

Abstract

Purpose

Research suggests family businesses often pursue risky or aggressive strategies despite the desire to preserve socioemotional wealth (SEW), which is thought to lead to conservativism in family firm strategic decision making. The purpose of this paper is to resolve this apparent contradiction by presenting a model that describes the screening criteria used by family business decision-makers when evaluating strategic opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual model relies on insights derived from image theory to resolve apparent contradictions inherent in the SEW perspective’s implications for family firms’ risky strategic decisions.

Findings

The proposed model suggests new strategic opportunities in family firms are evaluated through an unconscious, schema-driven decision process and that the preservation of SEW does not preclude risky strategic directions, but instead serves as an unconscious screening criteria for strategic opportunities.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by expanding the understanding of family-firm strategic decision-making to include considerations of the decision’s fit with the family’s principles, goals and strategic plan rather than solely to overall risk to SEW. Thus, the paper presents a detailed model of family-firm strategic decision-making that relies on insights from image theory.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Laura E. Marler, James M. Vardaman and David G. Allen

Human resource management is an understudied but burgeoning topic in the family business scholarly domain. This chapter provides a summary review of the existing…

Abstract

Human resource management is an understudied but burgeoning topic in the family business scholarly domain. This chapter provides a summary review of the existing literature on human resource management in family businesses and offers pathways for future research. The authors cluster the extant research into topic areas of compensation, recruitment and selection, training, employee performance, and turnover, and offer future research directions for each. In identifying gaps and tension in the literature, the chapter also highlights several broader theoretical pathways for future research. These opportunities include further inquiry into the outcomes of bifurcation bias, or the disparate treatment between family and non-family employees, the nuanced ways family firms recruit and select new employees, the role of high-performance work systems in family firms, the ways image considerations influence human resource practices in family firms, and the application of social network perspectives.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Abstract

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-430-5

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Miguel R. Olivas‐Lujan, Jacobo Ramirez and Laura Zapata‐Cantu

Using information and communication technologies to deliver human resource services (also known as e‐HRM) has become an important strategy for firms seeking to achieve a…

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Abstract

Purpose

Using information and communication technologies to deliver human resource services (also known as e‐HRM) has become an important strategy for firms seeking to achieve a competitive advantage. A case‐based study was carried out with the purpose of investigating how four of the most competitive Mexican firms are implementing their e‐HRM strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature from e‐HRM and human resource management in Latin America is reviewed and integrated. Four case studies developed in Mexican firms are depicted.

Findings

Evidence suggests that, to fully understand the way e‐HRM is used in firms from emerging economies, it is important to take into consideration local idiosyncrasies.

Originality/value

This study integrates Latin American dimensions of HR management in the study of e‐HRM, a budding research stream that is under‐investigated in emerging countries.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 July 2022

Jason Yip, Wendy Roldan, Carmen Gonzalez, Laura R. Pina, Maria Ruiz and Paola Vanegas

This study aims to investigate the collaboration processes of immigrant families as they search for online information together. Immigrant English-language learning adults…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the collaboration processes of immigrant families as they search for online information together. Immigrant English-language learning adults of lower socioeconomic status often work collaboratively with their children to search the internet. Family members rely on each other’s language and digital literacy skills in this collaborative process known as online search and brokering (OSB). While previous work has identified ecological factors that impact OSB, research has not yet distilled the specific learning processes behind such collaborations.

Design/methodology/approach

For this study, the authors adhere to practices of a case study examination. This study’s participants included parents, grandparents and children aged 10–17 years. Most adults were born in Mexico, did not have a college-degree, worked in service industries and represented a lower-SES population. This study conducted two to three separate in-home family visits per family with interviews and online search tasks.

Findings

From a case study analysis of three families, this paper explores the funds of knowledge, resilience, ecological support and challenges that children and parents face, as they engage in collaborative OSB experiences. This study demonstrates how in-home computer-supported collaborative processes are often informal, social, emotional and highly relevant to solving information challenges.

Research limitations/implications

An intergenerational OSB process is different from collaborative online information problem-solving that happens between classroom peers or coworkers. This study’s research shows how both parents and children draw on their funds of knowledge, resilience and ecological support systems when they search collaboratively, with and for their family members, to problem solve. This is a case study of three families working in collaboration with each other. This case study informs analytical generalizations and theory-building rather than statistical generalizations about families.

Practical implications

Designers need to recognize that children and youth are using the same tools as adults to seek high-level critical information. This study’s model suggests that if parents and children are negotiating information seeking with the same technology tools but different funds of knowledge, experience levels and skills, the presentation of information (e.g. online search results, information visualizations) needs to accommodate different levels of understanding. This study recommends designers work closely with marginalized communities through participatory design methods to better understand how interfaces and visuals can help accommodate youth invisible work.

Social implications

The authors have demonstrated in this study that learning and engaging in family online searching is not only vital to the development of individual and digital literacy skills, it is a part of family learning. While community services, libraries and schools have a responsibility to support individual digital and information literacy development, this study’s model highlights the need to recognize funds of knowledge, family resiliency and asset-based learning. Schools and teachers should identify and harness youth invisible work as a form of learning at home. The authors believe educators can do this by highlighting the importance of information problem solving in homes and youth in their families. Libraries and community centers also play a critical role in supporting parents and adults for technical assistance (e.g. WiFi access) and information resources.

Originality/value

This study’s work indicates new conditions fostering productive joint media engagement (JME) around OSB. This study contributes a generative understanding that promotes studying and designing for JME, where family responsibility is the focus.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 123 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Transgenerational Technology and Interactions for the 21st Century: Perspectives and Narratives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-639-9

Abstract

Details

New Directions in the Future of Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-298-0

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