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1 – 10 of 11

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Work, Workplaces and Disruptive Issues in HRM
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-780-0

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2010

Laura L. Bierema

The purpose of this paper is to empirically illustrate how human resource development (HRD) resists and omits issues of diversity in academic programs, textbooks, and…

2955

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically illustrate how human resource development (HRD) resists and omits issues of diversity in academic programs, textbooks, and research; analyze the research on HRD and diversity over a ten‐year period; discuss HRD's resistance to diversity; and offer some recommendations for a more authentic integration of diversity into HRD research, teaching, and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes common HRD textbooks and refereed diversity research over a ten‐year period to examine the amount of HRD research is being conducted in the area of diversity.

Findings

The paper found that HRD overwhelmingly omits diversity topics, in contradiction to its claims of “diversity” as a legitimate part of the field. The paper concludes that HRD's omission of diversity is a form of resistance since fundamentally addressing diversity threatens HRD's performative frameworks and practices.

Practical implications

The paper has implications for scholars and practitioners who are interested in not only producing more robust diversity scholarship, but also improving practice. The paper challenges HRD researchers to more systematically examine diversity and practitioners to be more cautious consumers of diversity practices.

Originality/value

The paper is original in its premise that HRD resists diversity and in its illustration of how glaring omissions of diversity are in HRD scholarship.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Laura L. Bierema

407

Abstract

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 34 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Abstract

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Julia Storberg‐Walker and Laura L. Bierema

The purpose of this article is to analyze the historical development of HRD knowledge. The analysis aims to use the qualitative research technique of text deconstruction…

1164

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to analyze the historical development of HRD knowledge. The analysis aims to use the qualitative research technique of text deconstruction on an important management text from the human relations phase of organization theory. Deconstruction is not a common method to HRD. In this paper, HRD scholars interested in how HRD knowledge and theories are created are given this tool to expose implicit assumptions.

Design/methodology/approach

The article uses text deconstruction, based on Bradshaw.

Findings

The deconstruction identified several beliefs that suggest that Roethlisberger was operating from a masculine epistemological perspective. Two clusters of findings emerged: one cluster revolved around the role of the researcher, and the other cluster revolved around the role of gender.

Research limitations/implications

Postpositivist perspectives on knowledge generation and theory building in HRD are limited. Post‐structural analyses need to be considered.

Practical implications

The article exposes how a gendered history influenced HRD scholarship and practice, and provides suggestions for future scholarship and practice.

Originality/value

Legitimizes text deconstruction as an integral research tool for HRD.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2022

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Work, Workplaces and Disruptive Issues in HRM
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-780-0

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2010

David McGuire and Mammed Bagher

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on diversity training and examine the effect of power, privilege and politics on diversity in organisations.

8331

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on diversity training and examine the effect of power, privilege and politics on diversity in organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper examining the arguments in favour and against diversity training in organisations. It identifies the presence of dominant groups in society leading to the marginalisation and oppression of minority diverse groups. It introduces the papers to the special issue under the three themes of: organisational impacts and outcomes; identify and self‐presentation and resistance to diversity.

Findings

The value of diversity training to promoting inclusivity, equality and fairness in organisations is underlined as is the importance of the human resource development community adopting a more proactive role in addressing the issue of diversity through research and course cirricula.

Originality/value

The paper introduces this special issue in “Diversity training in organisations” by examining the background concepts and providing an overview of the contributions to the issue.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Kecia M. Thomas, Laura Bierema and Harriet Landau

Women are underrepresented in the leadership ranks across society. Research and the development of strategies to assist corporate women in breaking the glass ceiling is…

1328

Abstract

Women are underrepresented in the leadership ranks across society. Research and the development of strategies to assist corporate women in breaking the glass ceiling is frequent and ongoing. Less prevalent has been a similar exploration of the barriers that women in academe confront in regards to their upward mobility and subsequent leadership. This article analyzes how academic women experience the glass ceiling, how research done on corporate women can inform much needed study of barriers to academic women’s upward mobility, and finally, how human resource development practices may benefit advancing women’s leadership in higher education.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 23 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 March 2022

Matthew W. Hurtienne, Jennifer Knowles and Laura E. Hurtienne

This paper aims to look at how participant photography can be used in human resource development (HRD) as a research method that is innovative and inclusive. In published…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to look at how participant photography can be used in human resource development (HRD) as a research method that is innovative and inclusive. In published work on traditional photo elicitation methods, the participant is shown previously prepared visual images to create knowledge. This can provoke an inaccurate depiction due to the images being previously prepared. Participant photography differs greatly from the traditional photo-elicitation method. In participant photography, the participant is provided with the opportunity to capture their own visual images of the surrounding environment, allowing for data to be captured through their own eyes. More notably, participants voice their own experiences after taking the photographs as a means for providing rich data for researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

Participant photography is an innovative qualitative research method where the research participant is encouraged to document their lived experiences through images taken by the participant. Additionally, the participants take part in individual interviews and group individual sessions to further explain the images.

Findings

The research findings can lead to deeper insight into the research topic and even accommodate potential issues related to literacy and language barriers. By introducing a new qualitative research method to HRD, the lived experiences can be documented and examined in a new, different and arguably more accurate way.

Research limitations/implications

Literature discussing participant photography in HRD is limited. Although this limitation puts constraints on this study, it creates an opportunity to further define how participant photography can be used in HRD. This method offers a means for HRD researchers and practitioners to focus on the voices of participants to improve organizations.

Practical implications

This study addresses how participant photography can be used in the field of HRD by describing the process of participant recruitment, implementation of the method, participant interviews, group discussion and analysis. Specifically, this study focused on the practical application, including the method’s strengths, potential weaknesses and ethical challenges.

Social implications

The method of participant photography has been commonly used in community-based studies, public health projects and medical research projects, yet in ever-changing HRD needs, there are many advantages for the field of HRD to implement this method.

Originality/value

Although the concept of participant photography is still in its infancy in HRD, this study explains how participant photography can be used for both researchers and practitioners to gain a deeper understanding and knowledge of topics related to HRD.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 46 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Peter A.C. Smith and Judy O’Neil

Many organizations now utilize action learning, and it is applied increasingly throughout the world. Action learning appears in numerous variants, but generically it is a…

2507

Abstract

Many organizations now utilize action learning, and it is applied increasingly throughout the world. Action learning appears in numerous variants, but generically it is a form of learning through experience, “by doing”, where the task environment is the classroom, and the task the vehicle. Two previous reviews of the action learning literature by Alan Mumford respectively covered the field prior to 1985 and the period 1985‐1994. Both reviews included books as well as journal articles. This current review covers the period 1994‐2000 and is limited to publicly available journal articles. Part 1 of the Review was published in an earlier issue of the Journal of Workplace Learning (Vol. 15 No. 2) and included a bibliography and comments. Part 2 extends that introduction with a schema for categorizing action learning articles and with comments on representative articles from the bibliography.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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