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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Laura Jacobs and Richard Shuker

The purpose of this paper is to explore the treatment experiences of adult male perpetrators of filicide within prison therapeutic communities (TCs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the treatment experiences of adult male perpetrators of filicide within prison therapeutic communities (TCs).

Design/methodology/approach

Participants took part in semi-structured interviews in order to capture their treatment experiences. The data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Findings

Five superordinate themes (therapeutic process; acceptance; insight; relationships; and barriers) and ten subordinate themes were identified. All themes were pertinent to understanding the participants’ experiences of TC treatment. The discussion provides reflections about the findings, contrasts them to psychological literature, along with suggestions for clinical practice and future research.

Originality/value

This research addressed a dearth of published literature within the area of male filicide and available treatment interventions.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Ian Williams and Gary Winship

The purpose of this paper is to build a new theoretical framework for inscribing the constituents of therapeutic community (TC) practice in prisons and other secure…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build a new theoretical framework for inscribing the constituents of therapeutic community (TC) practice in prisons and other secure psychiatric settings looking at three core element: homeliness, hope and humour.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on theory building, review of related literature, including research and policy, and synthesis from related funded research projects (Sociology of Health and Illness, Arts Humanities Research Council).

Findings

Home-as-method, and the concept of transitional home, highlights how a well-designed therapeutic environment looks and feels and can act as a base for effective rehabilitation. The TC aspires to offer a corrective new synthesis of home superseding the resident’s prior experience. A through-going definition of hope-as-method is outlined. It is argued that hope is co-constructed on the TC, and that there is a necessary challenge in gauging fluctuations in hope across time. Humour is a much overlooked idea but arguably an integral ingredient of healthy transactions between prisoners and staff. The particularities of humour present a challenge and an opportunity for harnessing the conditions when humour can flourish and conversely, the chain of events when mal humour damages community atmosphere.

Practical implications

H3 provides a new framework for reflecting on current TC practice, and also a model for developing novel ways of seeing, including the development of research and policy guidance. H3 also provides a philosophical base for developing a curriculum for education and training.

Originality/value

The 3Hs offers a rubric for positively narrating the aspirations of a prison milieu. The idea is purposively simple, and so far the authors have found that staff, prisoners and service directors are receptive to the concept, and there are plans for the 3Hs are set to be a narrative descriptor for developing practice in prisons.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2004

Lara Foley

This chapter is concerned with the varied legitimizing discourses used by midwives to frame their identities in relation to their work. This sociological issue is…

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with the varied legitimizing discourses used by midwives to frame their identities in relation to their work. This sociological issue is particularly important in the context of an occupation, such as this one, that exists at the border of competing service claims. Drawing on 26 in-depth interviews, I use narrative analysis to examine the stories that midwives tell about their work. Through these women’s work narratives, I show the complex intersection of narrative, culture, institution, and biography (Chase, 1995, 2001; DeVault, 1999).

Details

Gendered Perspectives on Reproduction and Sexuality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-088-3

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Vincent Mosco

Abstract

Details

The Smart City in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-138-4

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2006

Josephine May

This paper aims to engage with the cinematic history of Australian education by examining the historical representation of secondary schools in two Australian feature…

Abstract

This paper aims to engage with the cinematic history of Australian education by examining the historical representation of secondary schools in two Australian feature films of the 1970s: Picnic at Hanging Rock (Weir, 1975) and The Getting of Wisdom (Beresford, 1977). By what narrative strategies, metaphors and understandings were Australian high schools encoded into images and how might these interpretations differ from written accounts of the secondary schools? The discussion focuses on the social and material worlds of the schools. It reflects on the types of education depicted and the characterisations of teachers and students, including consideration of gender, class, and sexualities. The paper asks: what was the historical understanding of secondary schools that made them so attractive for cinematic explorations of Australian national identity in the 1970s?

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Laura Glitsos

This chapter is an examination of the contribution of female musicianship to the Perth metal scene, particularly in relation to the positioning of women in frontier…

Abstract

This chapter is an examination of the contribution of female musicianship to the Perth metal scene, particularly in relation to the positioning of women in frontier mythology and the ways in which we might read the gothic sublime in terms of women’s experiences. While it has been recognised that Australian metal music, in general, is tied to the colonial frontier narrative, Perth’s isolation produces a particular kind of frontier narrative which can be read in relation to the gothic sublime. In this chapter, the author examines three Perth metal bands which comprise female members: Claim the Throne (featuring Jess Millea on keys and vocals), Sanzu (featuring Fatima Curley on bass) and Deadspace (featuring Shelby Jansen on bass and vocals). The author will argue that there is a motif running through Perth bands that comprise female musicians that is tied to their positioning in the Western frontier narrative and its production in relation to the gothic sublime. To do so presents one kind of way to conceptualise a metal scene on the ‘Western Front’. The author emphasises that this is not a totalising conceptualisation, rather, it is one way to suggest how context might shape women’s experiences and, perhaps more importantly for this argument, the way in which women women’s experiences and historicity in relation to the legacy of ‘frontierswomen’ inflect metal music in this scene.

Details

Australian Metal Music: Identities, Scenes, and Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-167-4

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Xuan Pham, Laura Fitzpatrick and Richard Wagner

The purpose of this paper is to examine why the gender pay gap (GPG) – with its significant social costs generated through disadvantaging half of the population – persists…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine why the gender pay gap (GPG) – with its significant social costs generated through disadvantaging half of the population – persists in the USA despite decades-long efforts toward eradication.

Design/methodology/approach

A social provisioning approach, rooted in heterodox economics, is used to examine institutions that create and maintain the US GPG. The GPG is not a natural phenomenon, and, thus, must be examined within a specific social and historical context.

Findings

The analysis finds that the institutions of capitalism and patriarchy have created and perpetuated the GPG; however, mainstream economic theory does not consider these institutions and goes as far as explaining away the problem. Current US policies are formulated from this mainstream economic perspective, and, thus, are inherently flawed. The authors propose a reorientation toward a social provisioning theoretical perspective to analyze the GPG, which provides a more meaningful and practical foundation for policy formulation.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comprehensive examination of effective and ineffective theories and policies for addressing the GPG. Additionally, the authors provide concrete policy recommendations to eradicate the GPG.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 38 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Abstract

The concept of brand image has received considerable attention in marketing (Batra & Homer, 2004; Dhar & Wertenbroch, 2000; Roth, 1992; Thompson, Rindfleisch, & Arsel, 2006; van Reijmersdal, Neijens, & Smith, 2007; van Rekom, Jacobs, & Verlegh, 2006), yet there is still little agreement on its definition and operationalisation in the literature. As Dobni and Zinkhan (1990) observed, despite the frequent use by scholars of the term “brand image,” its definitions in the literature tend to focus on different elements. It is possible to group definitions of brand image into different categories. For example, brand image has been defined as (a) an attitude extending its meaning beyond the physical product (e.g., Reynolds & Gutman, 1984) and (b) perception, relating brand image to psychological aspects of a product's tangible attributes (e.g., Keller, 1998). One generally accepted view is that brand image can be defined as perceptions regarding a brand as reflected by the cluster of associations that consumers connect to the brand name in memory (Herzog, 1963). This is consistent with an associative network memory model. Thus, “brand associations are the other informational nodes linked to the brand node in memory and contain the meaning of the brand for consumers” (Keller, 2003, p. 66).

Details

New Challenges to International Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-469-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Laura Bragato and Kerry Jacobs

This paper describes the development and implementation of care pathways in two orthopaedic units in Scotland. Although originally developed as a tool of project…

Abstract

This paper describes the development and implementation of care pathways in two orthopaedic units in Scotland. Although originally developed as a tool of project management, care pathways have been promoted internationally as a response to concerns for patient safety, variability in care and increasing costs. Generally, care pathways can be seen as an example of clinician led rather than management led reform. However, it does reflect a wider shift towards process and away from hierarchical approaches to management. Within the UK care pathways have been promoted as a response to the modernisation initiative of the Labour Government. While the initiative was a success in both units it was more difficult to implement care pathways in a trauma rather than an elective unit. In conclusion, it is questionable whether care pathways are a universal response to the requirement for modernisation and service redesign in the NHS.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Book part
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Marjukka Ollilainen and Catherine Richards Solomon

With the rise in the number of women faculty since the 1970s, the traditional academic model of an exclusive devotion to work has been increasingly contested. Broad…

Abstract

Purpose

With the rise in the number of women faculty since the 1970s, the traditional academic model of an exclusive devotion to work has been increasingly contested. Broad changes have occurred in academic culture and policies to make many universities more family-friendly. Recent research on graduate students points to a shift in attitudes about work/family management as well. Graduate students, both male and female, seem to balk at expectations for a sole devotion to an academic career to the exclusion of family life. We examine how faculty members carry out acts of resistance to this traditional model.

Methodology/approach

This article presents research from two separate but related qualitative studies for a combined sample of 74 faculty members with children.

Findings

Women and men faculty make professional and personal choices and engage in behaviors that, in essence, are acts of resistance against the dominant but perhaps “old” culture of academe.

Originality/value

Resistance to the ideal worker norm in academia has been largely overlooked in studies about faculty parents (particularly fathers) and work/family balance. We demonstrate how faculty members act as agents of social change in academia.

Details

Gender Transformation in the Academy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-070-4

Keywords

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