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Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2014

Laura Fink

This article examines the effect of the customer focus (CF) group of competencies, which includes communication and negotiation skills, on project performance as measured…

Abstract

Purpose

This article examines the effect of the customer focus (CF) group of competencies, which includes communication and negotiation skills, on project performance as measured by reaching the internal and the overall budget, the quality, and the deadline goals.

Methodology/approach

The multiple regression model was based on a dataset from Trimo, an engineering and production company of prefabricated buildings.

Findings

The inverted U-shaped relationship of the CF group has been proven to exist with all project goals.

Research implications

The present study provides a starting-point for further empirical research on the international construction sector, projects, teams, and competence research.

Details

A Focused Issue on Building New Competences in Dynamic Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-274-6

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Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2014

Abstract

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A Focused Issue on Building New Competences in Dynamic Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-274-6

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Linda C. Lee

The purpose of this paper is to use empirical data on new principals to clarify the connection between different succession situations and the challenges their successor…

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1005

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use empirical data on new principals to clarify the connection between different succession situations and the challenges their successor principals face.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on two waves of interview data from a random sample of 16 new elementary school principals in a major urban school district in the USA.

Findings

New principals face distinct practice challenges depending on the nature of their successions. The less planned the succession, the less information and knowledge the new principal tends to possess. The more discontinuous the new administration’s trajectory is with the previous administration, the greater the staff resistance that the successor principal tends to face.

Research limitations/implications

Few studies systematically examine how succession situations differ in schools that are in need of transformation vs those in need of stability. This study addresses this gap by illuminating the varied processes of succession and highlighting specific mechanisms that link these processes to different organizational trajectories.

Practical implications

For district officials, this study suggests that principals in unplanned successions need greater support in quickly gathering information about their new schools while principals in discontinuous successions need greater expertise in how to balance trust-building and accountability in their attempts to promote transformational change.

Originality/value

This study’s primary value is its detailed articulation of how certain characteristics of succession situations are associated with specific types of challenges. Only studies at this level of specificity can be effective guides to practitioners and policymakers who are charged with preparing, selecting, and supporting new principals and their schools.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Laura Gerard, Janice McMillan and Norma D’Annunzio-Green

Literature encompassing sustainable leadership and developing leaders sustainably are still in infancy (Lambert, 2011). Nevertheless indications identify leadership as a…

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4225

Abstract

Purpose

Literature encompassing sustainable leadership and developing leaders sustainably are still in infancy (Lambert, 2011). Nevertheless indications identify leadership as a vital cog in achieving sustainable organisations. Sustainable leadership can allow a fast, resilient response which is competitive and appealing to all stakeholders (Avery and Bergsteiner, 2011a, b). Arguably, organisations’ need to stop considering leadership as a control function (Casserley and Critchley, 2010; Crews, 2010) and instead focus on dialogue and mutual-interdependency between leaders and their followers (Barr and Dowding, 2012). The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyse the concept of sustainable leadership to present a conceptual framework surrounding sustainable leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper will review the existing frameworks of sustainable leadership and present a conceptualisation of the frameworks. This conceptualisation synthesises frameworks and literature surrounding the concept of sustainable leadership which involves work from Casserley and Critchley (2010), Avery and Bergsteiner (2011a, b), Hargreaves and Fink (2006), Davies (2007) and Lambert (2011). Seminal themes from the synthesised frameworks are presented in order to attempt to unify the conceptualisation of sustainable leadership.

Findings

Within leadership literature, stakeholder approaches (Groves and LaRocca, 2011; Avery and Bergsteiner, 2011a); discourses underlining the importance of relationship between leaders and followers (Barr and Dowding, 2012); and discussions about the need to develop reflexive and participative leadership models (Kopp and Martinuzzi, 2013) have become prominent. Sustainable leadership embraces all of these new components. The concept advocates organisations should shift emphasis from a traditional singular focus on finances, to a view that organisations are contributors to wider environmental and social influences (Crews, 2010; Avery and Bergsteiner, 2011a).

Originality/value

This paper explores the theoretical frameworks which surround sustainable leadership and will synthesise and present commonly referenced facets of the concept within the internal and external factors influencing sustainable leadership.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Content available
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2157

Abstract

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Abstract

Details

Understanding Decision-Making in Educational Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-818-0

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Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2016

Jennifer E. Rivera and William F. Heinrich

This study aimed to match high-impact, experiential learning with equally powerful assessment practices.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to match high-impact, experiential learning with equally powerful assessment practices.

Methodology/approach

We observed three examples of programs, analyzing individual student artifacts to identify multiple learning outcomes across domains through a novel approach to assessment.

Findings

Important outcomes from this effort were boundary-crossing qualities made visible through a multi perspective assessment process.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should focus on the nature of experiential learning and measurement thereof.

Practical implications

Learning design should consider experiences as a means to reflection, which complement content delivery. Instructors may restructure course credit loads to better reflect additional learning outcomes.

Social implications

Learners with this feedback may be able to better articulate sociocultural learning.

Originality/value

Describes learning in experiential and high-impact education; novel assessment of experiential learning in university setting.

Details

Integrating Curricular and Co-Curricular Endeavors to Enhance Student Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-063-3

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Laura Ann Migliore

The purpose of this study is to quantitatively assess the inter‐relational aspects of personality traits, using the five‐factor model of personality, and Hofstede's five…

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38774

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to quantitatively assess the inter‐relational aspects of personality traits, using the five‐factor model of personality, and Hofstede's five dimensions of national culture for work‐related values to evaluate the differences between the US and Indian cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

The research method is quantitative and samples include qualified online‐panel respondents, representing educated and experienced business professionals who use the internet. Data analysis includes Pearson correlation and multiple analysis of variance. Sample results show large differences in all five cultural dimensions as compared to Hofstede's 1980 data.

Findings

Changes in work‐related values may reflect the influence of advances in communication and internet technologies, offering insight toward problems associated with global multicultural projects. Correlations between personality traits and cultural dimensions exist for certain occupational‐job categories, and provide insight on leadership characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include self‐reported responses via a web‐based survey, rather than actual observations in the workplace.

Practical implications

Technical and cultural competence is needed for global leaders, especially with increased use of the internet and networked environments. Navigating through cross‐cultural situations requires cultural insight, interpersonal skills, and an ability to build trust.

Originality/value

This study extends Hofstede's 1980 original research by acquiring new, cross‐culturally comparative data. It also extends the original research of Donnellan et al., regarding the Mini NEO assessment. The study provides confirmatory analysis to the exploratory work of Smith and Bond and McCrae, but only for one of the three predicted correlations: extraversion with individualism.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Anja Overgaard Thomassen

In this chapter the notion of ‘the third context’ is presented as a useful perspective in order to reduce the gap between work and continuing education, as continuing…

Abstract

In this chapter the notion of ‘the third context’ is presented as a useful perspective in order to reduce the gap between work and continuing education, as continuing education is argued to be an activity different from work as well as education, namely as something ‘third’. Consequently, ‘the third context’ is an alternative to the predominant understanding of work and education as two incompatible entities based on different paradigms. The understanding of incompatibility between work and education had extensive influence on learner engagement and learning outcome in two continuing education courses based on Facilitated Work Based Learning (FWBL). FWBL focuses extensively on integrating work and continuing education with the purpose of increasing employee involvement and engagement: Theoretically, FWBL is inspired by John Dewey and Problem Based Learning. Obstacles occurred during the FWBL courses, especially in relation to the question of ‘how can work and continuing education be integrated?’ More extensive use of information technology is argued to be a method supporting the alignment of processes between the FWBL course and the workplace.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Mobile Applications: Smartphones, Skype and Texting Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-509-8

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Kaela Casey, Linda Kennedy, Janet Pinkley and Laura Worden

Each of Ventura County’s four public institutions of higher education list information literacy (IL) as either an institutional outcome or general education outcome for…

Abstract

Purpose

Each of Ventura County’s four public institutions of higher education list information literacy (IL) as either an institutional outcome or general education outcome for their students. Despite this, communication between the four campuses on this topic was limited. Librarians from these institutions applied to be part of the grant-funded Project ALAS Faculty Fellows Program to find ways to collaborate with each other and with teaching faculty to support the development of IL skills in transfer students.

Design/methodology/approach

Librarians from Ventura County’s four public institutions of higher education, with funding from the Project ALAS Faculty Fellows Program, held a one-day IL summit to bring librarians and teaching faculty together to unify objectives and create a seamless IL transition for transfer students.

Findings

Creating an opportunity for librarians and teaching faculty to discuss the definition and potential applications of IL in courses and assignments led to positive outcomes. Teaching faculty learned about library resources and took steps to begin collaborating with their campus librarian(s). Librarians also learned about different academic expectations in various disciplines, made new connections and made plans for future IL-focused collaborations.

Originality/value

Studies have demonstrated that IL is a key component to student transfer success. However, this is not an element in education that can be achieved by one department alone. The collaborative effort described in this paper can serve as a model for other librarians hoping to foster dialogue and cooperation amongst their regional institutions.

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