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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Laura Davidson and Walter E. Block

The purpose of this paper is to correct Rozeff (2010). He contends that fractional-reserve banking is legitimate and efficacious. The authors demonstrate that it is not.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to correct Rozeff (2010). He contends that fractional-reserve banking is legitimate and efficacious. The authors demonstrate that it is not.

Design/methodology/approach

The design of this paper is to quote widely from Rozeff (2010) and then to expose his errors of analysis.

Findings

The authors demonstrate that fractional-reserve banking is neither legitimate nor efficacious.

Originality/value

Money is the lifeblood of the economy. If so, then banking is the marrow of the economy, since it is from that sector that money arises in the first place. It is crucially important, then, that the monetary system be based on sound principles. Fractional-reserve banking is a violation of these sound principles. Therefore, it is valuable to demonstrate that this is indeed the case.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2018

D. Kirk Davidson, Kanji Tanimoto, Laura Gyung Jun, Shallini Taneja, Pawan K. Taneja and Juelin Yin

The origins of corporate social responsibility (CSR) have been widely attributed to the work of scholars, and business managers as well, in North America and Western…

Abstract

The origins of corporate social responsibility (CSR) have been widely attributed to the work of scholars, and business managers as well, in North America and Western Europe. Inevitably, however, as the economic interaction of individual firms and entire nations has grown over the past several decades — call it globalization — so too has the concept and the practice of CSR spread throughout the world. It is certainly time to explore how CSR is being incorporated into the practice of business management in other regions and other countries. Therefore, in this chapter we will focus on Asia: specifically on Japan, South Korea, India, and China. It is interesting for academicians to understand how CSR is being absorbed and adapted into the business cultures of these four countries. Perhaps of even greater importance, it is vital that business managers know what to expect about the interaction between business and society as well as the government as their commercial activities grow in this burgeoning part of the world.

For each of these four countries, we will provide an overview of the extent to which CSR has become a part of the academic community and also how it is being practiced and incorporated in everyday management affairs. We will see that there are very significant differences among these countries which lead to the natural question: why? To answer this question, we will use an eight-part analytical framework developed specifically for this purpose. We will look at the history, the dominant religious beliefs, the relevant social customs, the geography, the political structures, the level of economic development, civil society institutions, and the “safety net” of each country. As a result of this analysis, we believe, academicians can learn how CSR is absorbed and spread into commercial affairs, and managers can profit from learning more about what to expect when doing business in this increasingly important region.

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Laura Davidson and Walter E Block

– The purpose of this paper is to clarify definitions in economics.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify definitions in economics.

Design/methodology/approach

To apply the insights of Austrian economics to terms widely used in the profession.

Findings

The authors find that the Austrian approach brings clarification to communication.

Originality/value

The authors know of no other such attempt. Therefore this paper presumably has some originality.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2016

Alistair Davidson and Laura Klemme

One approach for CEOs seeking to improve the effectiveness of their company’s innovation initiatives is to imitate the role that a “Scrum Master” has in high speed…

Abstract

Purpose

One approach for CEOs seeking to improve the effectiveness of their company’s innovation initiatives is to imitate the role that a “Scrum Master” has in high speed software development projects. Fundamentally, a Scrum Master is in the business of speeding up the rate of innovation in a software project.

Design/methodology/approach

By championing Agile methodology, CEOs can focus innovation initiatives upon developing what customers prioritize and value. Pushing the organization to involve customers, and in some cases suppliers, increases the value added and value creation of the project.

Findings

When a CEO practices acting like a Scrum Master, he or she does so by pursuing four goals: Keeping innovation work cycles or “Sprints” short. Focusing upon value creation and customer involvement throughout the development process. Removing barriers to development that prevent the software programmers from doing their job. Attempting to shelter developers from counterproductive interventions by external managers.

Practical implications

By championing Agile teams, the CEO can communicate his or her expectation that innovations will be tested on clients and be available as a “court of last resort” to cut through the barriers and delays that prevent a development team from moving forward.”

Originality/value

This article is unconventional in that it suggests that CEOs need to be particularly aware of how their actions in support of Agile teams can build medium and long term organizational capabilities. Top management oversight of Agile teams can strengthen strategic relationships with internal stakeholders, customers and suppliers.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Laura Davidson, Lisa McNeill and Shelagh Ferguson

The magazine industry is currently experiencing a period of significant growth, resulting in increased competition in the marketplace. As a consequence of these changes…

Abstract

Purpose

The magazine industry is currently experiencing a period of significant growth, resulting in increased competition in the marketplace. As a consequence of these changes many magazine producers are being forced to look for fresh and innovative ways to attract and retain readers. By broadening our understanding of how brand community relates to the consumption of products such as magazines, this paper aims to highlight the way in which the community concept offers opportunities to further bridge the gap between a product and the needs of the consumer.

Design/methodology/approach

The study follows a qualitative approach, using a two‐stage research design consisting of semi‐structured intercept interviews and focus group inquiry.

Findings

The research generated a number of findings in regards to magazine loyalty, brand attachment, reader connections, community formation and the use of traditional brand community support tools in the magazine industry context.

Research limitations/implications

Overall, magazine consumption is found to be conducive to brand community formation, and a number of recommendations and guidelines for fostering and supporting magazine brand communities can thus be given.

Originality/value

This paper extends existing brand community knowledge and current research by investigating the factors driving the formation of brand community in a specific context.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 27 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Abstract

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 January 2016

Catherine Gorrell

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Abstract

Details

Corporate Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-260-0

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Hannah Bonner

This chapter investigates the recent surge of social media (mis)use in horror films including The Cabin in the Woods (2012), Unfriended (2015) and #Horror (2015) and how…

Abstract

This chapter investigates the recent surge of social media (mis)use in horror films including The Cabin in the Woods (2012), Unfriended (2015) and #Horror (2015) and how young women’s relationship to social media in these films often pillories females for existing under, and delighting in, an anonymous, ubiquitous gaze. In these narratives, women are slut shamed both in the plot and through the threat of social media’s panoply of screens, sur- and selfveillance. In my discussion, I will utilize feminist film theory including the writings of Laura Mulvey, Linda Williams and Barbara Creed, while also including contemporary cultural criticism from writers and journalists like Nancy Jo Sales and Leora Tanenbaum to explore the horror genre from a more contemporary, multi-discourse perspective. The technology in these films serve as harbingers, intimating the figurative and literal dangers to come for their female protagonists, ultimately suggesting that the horror in these films is the medium itself and the patriarchal social media culture that these devices cultivate.

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Film
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-898-7

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Developing Leaders for Positive Organizing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-241-1

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