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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2019

Farui Du, Jinqian Zhu, Xueping Ding, Qi Zhang, Honglin Ma, Jie Yang, Hongzhong Cao, Zemin Ling, Guoyu Wang, Xuanming Duan and Shuqian Fan

A wire-based additive manufacturing system works with high manufacturing efficiency and low dimensional precision. The purpose of this paper is to study the dimensional…

Abstract

Purpose

A wire-based additive manufacturing system works with high manufacturing efficiency and low dimensional precision. The purpose of this paper is to study the dimensional characteristics of Ti-6Al-4V thin-walled parts with wire-based multi-laser additive manufacturing in vacuum.

Design/methodology/approach

Wire-based multi-laser additive manufacturing was carried out to understand the effect brought from different parameters. The Ti-6Al-4V thin-walled parts were formed by different height increments, power inputs and inter-layer cooling times in vacuum.

Findings

The result shows that, with the number of layers increment, the layer width of thin-walled part increases gradually in the beginning and stabilizes soon afterward. Height increment, laser power and inter-layer cooling time could affect the energy input to the deposited bead and heat accumulation of thin-walled part. The layer width decreases, while the height increment increases. The increment of laser power could increase the layer width. And, the increment of inter-layer cooling time (more than 5 s) has little effect on the layer width.

Originality/value

The heat dissipation mode of thin-walled parts in vacuum and the influence of different parameters on layer width are explained in this paper. It provides a reference for further understanding and controlling dimension precision of Ti-6Al-4V thin-walled part with wire-based multi-laser additive manufacturing in vacuum. At the same time, it provides a reference for researches of dimensional characteristics in the additive manufacturing industry.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2019

Bo Chen, Yongzhen Yao, Yuhua Huang, Wenkang Wang, Caiwang Tan and Jicai Feng

This paper aims to explore the influences of different process parameters, including laser power, scanning speed, defocusing distance and scanning mode, on the shape…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the influences of different process parameters, including laser power, scanning speed, defocusing distance and scanning mode, on the shape features of molten pool and, based on the obtained relationship, realize the diagnosis of forming defects during the process.

Design/methodology/approach

Molten pool was captured on-line based on a coaxial CCD camera mounted on the welding head, then image processing algorithms were developed to obtain melt pool features that could reflect the forming status, and it suggested that the molten pool area was the most sensitive characteristic. The influence of the processing parameters such as laser power, traverse speed, powder feed rate, defocusing distance and the melt pool area was studied, and then the melt pool area was used as the characteristic to detect the forming defects during the cladding and additive manufacturing process.

Findings

The influences of different process parameters on molten pool area were explored. Based on the relationship, different types of defects were accurately detected through analyzing the relationship between the molten pool area and time.

Originality/value

The findings would be helpful for the quality control of laser additive manufacturing.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Tomaz Brajlih, Matej Paulic, Tomaz Irgolic, Ziga Kadivnik, Joze Balic and Igor Drstvensek

This paper aims to present a comparison between selective laser sintering and injection moulding technology for the production of small batches of plastic products.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a comparison between selective laser sintering and injection moulding technology for the production of small batches of plastic products.

Design/methodology/approach

The comparison is based on analysing the time–cost efficiencies of each manufacturing process regarding the size of the series for the selected product sample. Both technologies are described and the times and costs of those individual processes needed to create a final product are assessed when using each of the manufacturing processes.

Findings

The study shows that the time-cost efficiency of the selected laser sintering technology increases according to the complexity of the product and decreases with increasing series size and product volume.

Research limitations/implications

The study and absolute values of the presented results are limited to a selected plastic product, but the series size-focused efficiency analysis could be expanded to general cases.

Originality/value

The presented analysis could be used as a general guideline for a decision-making process regarding the more efficient manufacturing method. In addition, the results show the viability of using selective laser sintering during the early stages of production when fast product availability is required, regardless of the series size. Also, some complementary effects of using both technologies in the serial production of the same part are discussed.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Yuran Jin, Shoufeng Ji, Xin Li and Jiangnan Yu

Additive manufacturing has achieved rapid development in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to visualize the intellectual landscapes of additive manufacturing and…

Abstract

Purpose

Additive manufacturing has achieved rapid development in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to visualize the intellectual landscapes of additive manufacturing and identify the hotspots and emerging trends of additive manufacturing, which can provide references for scholars, enterprises and governments to promote the development of theory and practice in the additive manufacturing field.

Design/methodology/approach

Science mapping is a fast-growing interdisciplinary field originated in information science and technology. Based on this methodology, guided by a computational approach, the paper visualizes the co-occurring keywords network and co-citation references network by CiteSpaceIII software to explore the hotspots and emerging trends of additive manufacturing by the following five indicators: highly cited keywords, burst keywords, clusters, landmark references and burst references.

Findings

Additive manufacturing,” “3D printing,” “3D powder printing,” “consolidation phenomena,” “microstructure,” “rapid prototyping,” etc., are the main hotspots of additive manufacturing. The trends of additive manufacturing generally consist of three stages: the fundamental concepts stage from 1995 to 2000 (“rapid prototyping,” “additive manufacturing,” etc.), the approaches and techniques applications stage from 2001 to 2010 (“stereolithography,” “scaffold,” etc.), and the emerging trends stage from 2011 to the present (“stem cell”, “selective laser,” “ti-6al-4v,” etc.). The research is most abundant in 2010 and 2012. The medical field is an important hotspot of additive manufacturing. Additive manufacturing has been researched in interdiscipline.

Originality/value

The paper maps the perspective of additive manufacturing and explore the hotspots and emerging trends of additive manufacturing.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2019

Md. Hazrat Ali, Shaheidula Batai and Dastan Sarbassov

This study highlights the demand for low-cost and high accuracy products through the design and development of new 3D printing technologies. Besides, significant progress…

Abstract

Purpose

This study highlights the demand for low-cost and high accuracy products through the design and development of new 3D printing technologies. Besides, significant progress has been made in this field. A comparative study helps to understand the latest development in materials and future prospect of this technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Nevertheless, a large amount of progress still remains to be made. While some of the works have focused on the performances of the materials, the rest have focused on the development of new methods and techniques in additive manufacturing.

Findings

This paper critically evaluates the current 3D printing technologies, including the development and optimizations made to the printing methods, as well as the printed objects. Meanwhile, previous developments in this area and contributions to the modern trend in manufacturing technology are summarized briefly.

Originality/value

The paper can be summarized in three sections. Firstly, the existing printing methods along with the frequently used printing materials, as well as the processing parameters, and the factors which influence the quality and mechanical performances of the printed objects are discussed. Secondly, the optimization techniques, such as topology, shape, structure and mechanical property, are described. Thirdly, the latest development and applications of additive manufacturing are depicted, and the scope of future research in the relevant area is put forward.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Benoit Rosa, Pascal Mognol and Jean-Yves Hascoët

Direct metal deposition (DMD) with laser is an additive manufacturing process enabling rapid manufacturing of complex metallic and thin parts. However, the final quality…

Abstract

Purpose

Direct metal deposition (DMD) with laser is an additive manufacturing process enabling rapid manufacturing of complex metallic and thin parts. However, the final quality of DMD-manufactured surfaces is a real issue that would require a polishing operation. Polishing processes are usually based on abrasive or chemical techniques. These conventional processes are composed by many drawbacks such as accessibility of complex shapes, environmental impacts, high time consumption and cost, health risks for operators, etc. […] This paper aims to solve these problems and improve surface quality by investigating the laser polishing (LP) process.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on melting material by laser, the LP process enables the smoothing of initial topography. However, the DMD process and the LP processes are based on laser technology. In this context, the laser DMD process is used directly on the same machine for the polishing operation. Currently, few studies focus on LP of additive laser manufacturing surfaces, and it tends to limit the industrial use of additive manufacturing technology. The proposed study describes an experimental analysis of LP surfaces obtained by DMD process.

Findings

The investigation results in the improvement of a complete final surface quality, according to LP parameters. For mastering LP processes, operating parameters are modelled.

Originality/value

This experimental study introduces the LP of thin and complex DMD parts, to develop LP applications. The final objective is to create a LP methodology for optimizing the final topography and productivity time according to parts’ characteristics.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Jan Wilkes, Yves‐Christian Hagedorn, Wilhelm Meiners and Konrad Wissenbach

The purpose this paper is to develop an additive manufacturing (AM) technique for high‐strength oxide ceramics. The process development aims at directly manufacturing

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose this paper is to develop an additive manufacturing (AM) technique for high‐strength oxide ceramics. The process development aims at directly manufacturing fully dense ceramic freeform‐components with good mechanical properties.

Design/methodology/approach

The selective laser melting of the ceramic materials zirconia and alumina has been investigated experimentally. The approach followed up is to completely melt ZrO2/Al2O3 powder mixtures by a focused laser beam. In order to reduce thermally induced stresses, the ceramic is preheated to a temperature of at least 1,600°C during the build up process.

Findings

It is possible to manufacture ceramic objects with almost 100 percent density, without any sintering processes or any post‐processing. Crack‐free specimens have been manufactured that have a flexural strength of more than 500 MPa. Manufactured objects have a fine‐grained two‐phase microstructure consisting of tetragonal zirconia and alpha‐alumina.

Research limitations/implications

Future research may focus on improving the surface quality of manufactured components, solving issues related to the cold powder deposition on the preheated ceramic, further increasing the mechanical strength and transferring the technology from laboratory scale to industrial application.

Practical implications

Potential applications of this technique include manufacturing individual all‐ceramic dental restorations, ceramic prototypes and complex‐shaped ceramic components that cannot be made by any other manufacturing technique.

Originality/value

This new manufacturing technique based on melting and solidification of high‐performance ceramic material has some significant advantages compared to laser sintering techniques or other manufacturing techniques relying on solid‐state sintering processes.

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Pedram Parandoush, Palamandadige Fernando, Hao Zhang, Chang Ye, Junfeng Xiao, Meng Zhang and Dong Lin

Additively manufactured objects have layered structures, which means post processing is often required to achieve a desired surface finish. Furthermore, the additive

Abstract

Purpose

Additively manufactured objects have layered structures, which means post processing is often required to achieve a desired surface finish. Furthermore, the additive nature of the process makes it less accurate than subtractive processes. Hence, additive manufacturing techniques could tremendously benefit from finishing processes to improve their geometric tolerance and surface finish.

Design/methodology/approach

Rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM) was chosen as a finishing operation for drilling additively manufactured carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. Two distinct additive manufacturing methods of fused deposition modeling (FDM) and laser-assisted laminated object manufacturing (LA-LOM) were used to fabricate CFRP plates with continuous carbon fiber reinforcement. The influence of the feedrate, tool rotation speed and ultrasonic power of the RUM process parameters on the aforementioned quality characteristics revealed the feasibility of RUM process as a finishing operation for additive manufactured CFRP.

Findings

The quality of drilled holes in the CFRP plates fabricated via LA-LOM was supremely superior to the FDM counterparts with less pullout delamination, smoother surface and less burr formation. The strong interfacial bonding in LA-LOM proven to be superior to FDM was able to endure higher cutting force of the RUM process. The cutting force and cutting temperature overwhelmed the FDM parts and induced higher surface damage.

Originality/value

Overall, the present study demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid additive and subtractive manufacturing method that could potentially reduce cost and waste of the CFRP production for industrial applications.

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Reimund Neugebauer, Bernhard Müller, Mathias Gebauer and Thomas Töppel

The purpose of this paper is to show the innovative approach of manufacturing filigree and highly complex components by means of laser beam melting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show the innovative approach of manufacturing filigree and highly complex components by means of laser beam melting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the unique geometric freedom of the laser beam melting technology and its possibility of quick, tool‐less production of complex components allow the manufacturing of functionally superior components in a short time.

Findings

Principally concludes the following: additive manufacturing proved to give superior properties to the component compared to conventional manufacturing methods.

Originality/value

This study provides context for the development and manufacturing of an individual heat‐transfer component for an electric‐driven formula race car.

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2017

Renwei Liu, Zhiyuan Wang, Todd Sparks, Frank Liou and Cedo Nedic

This paper aims to investigate a stereo vision-based hybrid (additive and subtractive) manufacturing process using direct laser metal deposition, computer numerical…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate a stereo vision-based hybrid (additive and subtractive) manufacturing process using direct laser metal deposition, computer numerical control (CNC) machining and in-process scanning to repair metallic components automatically. The focus of this work was to realize automated alignment and adaptive tool path generation that can repair metallic components after a single setup.

Design/methodology/approach

Stereo vision was used to detect the defect area for automated alignment. After the defect is located, a laser displacement sensor is used to scan the defect area before and after laser metal deposition. The scan is then processed by an adaptive algorithm to generate a tool path for repairing the defect.

Findings

The hybrid manufacturing processes for repairing metallic component combine the advantages of free-form fabrication from additive manufacturing with the high-accuracy offered by CNC machining. A Ti-6Al-4V component with a manufacturing defect was repaired by the proposed process. Compared to previous research on repairing worn components, introducing stereo vision and laser scanning dramatically simplifies the manual labor required to extract and reconstruct the defect area’s geometry.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates an automated metallic component repair process by integrating stereo vision and a laser displacement sensor into a hybrid manufacturing system. Experimental results and microstructure analysis shows that the defect area could be repaired feasibly and efficiently with acceptable heat affected zone using the proposed approach.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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