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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Lars Torsten Eriksson

Market orientation is an attitude, i.e. a state of mind – nota theory or an operational variable. This attitude focuses on thestimuli inherent in market demand and…

Abstract

Market orientation is an attitude, i.e. a state of mind – not a theory or an operational variable. This attitude focuses on the stimuli inherent in market demand and perceived commercial opportunities. Successful market orientation requires both adaptability of structural parameters and a high level of efficiency in established processes. Market orientation occurs on different levels of aggregation in the economy and has implications for (a) the market, (b) exchange, and (c) organisations. This universe is currently being subjected to increasing forces of compression: distances in time and space are shrinking. Macro‐economic changes must be analysed parallel with the development of business ideas, the responses of marketing activities to new situations and continuous processes of internal reform and innovation. Rightly perceived as a complex issue, market orientation leaves greater scope for business decisions.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 91 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2008

Lars Torsten Eriksson, Jens Hultman and Lucia Naldi

The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore small business e‐commerce development and usage of the emerging ICT‐infrastructure for e‐commerce in Sweden. For more…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore small business e‐commerce development and usage of the emerging ICT‐infrastructure for e‐commerce in Sweden. For more than a decade firms in countries with appropriate infrastructures in place have generally been able to exploit internet technologies for business purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the results from a telephone survey on Swedish small businesses. The 160 firms surveyed were independent manufacturing firms in Sweden with a number of employees ranging from ten to 50 and a turnover not surpassing €10 million. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS.

Findings

The paper presents empirical data on e‐commerce development among small businesses in Sweden. The study shows that a significant share of the studied firms have adopted internet technologies, but also that more than 70 per cent of the small businesses in the study have more than five years of experience of e‐commerce. The study finds that small businesses in Sweden show remarkably high levels of e‐commerce adoption. The study shows strong penetration of web site and e‐mail use among small businesses in Sweden, but also that advanced applications are still not broadly applied.

Originality/value

Statistics presented by the OECD have recurrently shown that the Scandinavian countries are in the lead as regards building an ICT infrastructure. Sweden's leading position in ICT has been confirmed by several studies. Because of scarce resources and lack of knowledge, small businesses are generally known to be lagging in terms of ICT use. This study empirically explores small business e‐commerce development in Sweden and contributes to the stream of research aiming at benchmarking e‐commerce development.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Sara Melén Hånell, Emilia Rovira Nordman and Lars-Gunnar Mattsson

This study addresses the research question: How does the experiential knowledge, superstitious knowledge and the wisdom of CEOs influence the internationalization…

Abstract

Purpose

This study addresses the research question: How does the experiential knowledge, superstitious knowledge and the wisdom of CEOs influence the internationalization behaviour of SMEs?

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative study is used. Longitudinal case studies of two Swedish life science companies are analysed.

Findings

An individual's prior experiential knowledge influence the newly started SME's market commitments and internationalization behaviour. Such prior experiences can enable early and rapid resource commitments in the newly started SMEs. Relying upon such prior experiential knowledge in deciding upon the company's market commitments however heightens the risk of superstitious learning. The findings illustrate how wisdom can work as an antidote to superstitious learning. Wisdom lures even experienced CEOs away from believing they know more than they actually know.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to extend the Uppsala model by incorporating the role of individual-level experiential knowledge. The study also adds value to the literature on small firm internationalization by providing propositions for how the prior knowledge of individual key decision makers influences SMEs' internationalization behaviour. The propositions provide new input to the ongoing discussion in the literature and help to guide future research.

Originality/value

Given the fact that the Uppsala model is centred upon a firm-level view on experiential knowledge, our theoretical understanding is still limited regarding how individual-level experiential knowledge influences the internationalization behaviour of SMEs. This study addresses calls for research on how individuals' prior knowledge influences small-firm internationalization.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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