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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Judi Briden and Ann Marshall

The purpose of this paper is to quantify recent changes in students' use of laptops in one academic library and to consider the potential role of new high‐tech library…

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1138

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to quantify recent changes in students' use of laptops in one academic library and to consider the potential role of new high‐tech library spaces on laptop use.

Design/methodology/approach

Instead of relying on standard library exit and entrance counts, this study was based on brief, structured observations of library spaces, including counts of laptop use. By conducting such observations over regular intervals in both new and pre‐existing library spaces, the authors were able to observe changes in laptop use across both time and type of library space.

Findings

The growth in laptop use dramatically exceeded expectations: 28 percent of students used laptops in existing spaces in 2005, while 62 percent of students used laptops in the same spaces in 2008. While a new, adjoining high‐tech space also had high laptop use, the opening of this new space coincided with growth in both laptop use and overall student presence in the pre‐existing library spaces. In addition, the paper posits a variety of potential causes for these changes, including available technology and hardware, university‐wide policy, and student behavior.

Originality/value

The changing use of laptops in libraries is important for administrative decision making at both the library and institutional level, including decisions about facilities, technology infrastructure and support, and security.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Gila Cohen Zilka

Education systems worldwide are facing the question whether to adopt the “Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)” approach and allow students to bring their personal laptops to…

Abstract

Purpose

Education systems worldwide are facing the question whether to adopt the “Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)” approach and allow students to bring their personal laptops to school. The purpose of the study was to understand the advantages and disadvantages of using a laptop during lessons in schools and in institutions of higher education, from the perspective of preservice teachers who watch the lessons and practice teaching in schools, while studying at an institution of higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The research questions were: What are the pros and cons of a regular use of personal laptops during lessons? How do learners use their laptop during lessons in schools and colleges? This was a mixed-method study with emphasis on quality analysis. Methods. Participants were 215 preservice teachers studying at academic institutions for teacher training in Israel.

Findings

The findings indicate that the benefits of using laptops are in the availability and accessibility of the digital environments and the many possibilities to integrate these environments and achieve goals of acquiring skills in the process of learning and teaching that takes place in the classroom. The findings further show that all learners, and especially adolescents, extensively and frequently use various digital developments.

Research limitations/implications

This study examined the integration of laptops in the teaching and learning processes of preservice teachers who are in the process of forming their identity as future professionals teaching in the twenty-first century. The lessons chosen by preservice teachers to conduct during their teaching practicum have not been examined, therefore it is desirable that future studies examine the way in which preservice teachers choose the lessons to teach and how they practice teaching: whether in the traditional or the constructivist way, and if so, why?

Practical implications

It is advisable to enable preservice teachers to look at a combination of digital environments in teaching and to experience teaching in these environments, to increase e-readiness for teaching in a digital environment.

Social implications

How do learners use their laptops during lessons in school and in higher education?

Originality/value

Acquiring skills in the process of learning and teaching that takes place in the classroom.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Susan Elwood, Chuleeporn Changchit and Robert Cutshall

This study aims to examine students' perceptions and their acceptance towards implementing a laptop program.

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2947

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine students' perceptions and their acceptance towards implementing a laptop program.

Design/methodology/approach

Extensive research has been carried out on the technology acceptance model (TAM) to better understand the behavioral intention of individuals to accept and use technology. Therefore, the TAM was adopted as the theoretical framework. Data analysis consisted of factor analysis according to the TAM model's two primary constructs, followed by T‐tests to determine the impact of the discovered factors on participants' attitudes on a laptop initiative.

Findings

This study analyzes survey questions related to the two factors in the TAM model, as well as the discovery of a third factor, perceived change. By understanding what factors are of main concern to students, a laptop program can be made more useful to students and universities.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to one particular university. Suggestions for further research are to adapt and conduct the suggested survey tool in other university settings, according to the constructs of the TAM model as described in this paper.

Practical implications

The laptop initiative questionnaire contains questions that focus on all three TAM model factors. This provides a comprehensive base of questions for those needing to conduct similar lines of research within their universities.

Originality/value

This paper provides a tested survey based upon the widely accepted technology acceptance model with an added factor pertinent to the exploration of technology acceptance within the university environment.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Fang Gu

This paper aims to present a successful partnership between the library and other campus units of California State University Sacramento in the program of campus‐wide…

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1656

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a successful partnership between the library and other campus units of California State University Sacramento in the program of campus‐wide laptop loan service. As an integral part of university resources, the library staff and systems play an exceptional role in collaborating with other university units in the campus‐wide program.

Design/methodology/approach

Three campus units worked together to create a model of support in innovation, cooperation and sharing of the campus resources, technology and expertise. Introducing the establishment of the campus‐wide loan service program and sharing service feedback retrieved from multiple service units in the project contributed to the success of this new program in the campus resource‐sharing practice.

Findings

Collaboration, cooperation, and teamwork are fundamental in sharing campus resources, and creating staffing synergies and delivering an ever‐increasing range of university services, especially in an environment of budget constraints and economic difficulties.

Originality/value

There are many academic libraries now providing laptop loan service, but campus‐wide laptop loan service needs more collaboration, cooperation and communication for the program crew to embrace differences in serving a common‐interest group.

Details

Library Management, vol. 32 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Mathias Hatakka, Annika Andersson and Åke Grönlund

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate effects of students’ 1:1 laptop use from a capability perspective by investigating increases and decreases of students…

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2310

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate effects of students’ 1:1 laptop use from a capability perspective by investigating increases and decreases of students’ opportunities and choices. The paper investigates changes that have taken place and how these changes enable or restrict students to do and be what they desire.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper undertakes an interpretive case study based on group interviews and questionnaires. Sen's capability approach is used as theoretical framework and has informed the data collection and the analysis.

Findings

1:1 laptops in schools have provided students with new opportunities and choices, but also restricted others. An evident opportunity is the equalization of access to computers. Other opportunities relate to schoolwork efficiency and increased access to information. Gains also include the use of different media for overcoming disabilities or to fit individual learning styles. Regarding students’ well‐being, a “fun” learning environment is mentioned. However, the “fun” is often about playing games or using social media – something which diverts the students’ attention from the learning. Students also find that they are less social, too computer dependent, and that they miss using pen and paper. Additionally, health issues such as back problems and headaches are reported, as well as an increased risk of being robbed.

Originality/value

Most research on 1:1 laptops in education focuses on easily quantifiable measures and reports from a teacher perspective. The paper takes a broader approach and investigates the impact 1:1 laptops have on students’ well‐being and agency.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Miguel M. Gonzales

The purpose of this paper is to examine the significant challenges school administrators encountered leading a one-to-one laptop school and what vision school…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the significant challenges school administrators encountered leading a one-to-one laptop school and what vision school administrators have for one-to-one laptop use in the classroom.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for this study was a case study approach. In total, 15 school administrators were interviewed from the Western region of the USA.

Findings

Results from the study indicated that significant challenges for school administrators were budgeting and sustaining the initiative, and negotiating and setting expectations for instructional use with teachers. School administrators also envisioned one-to-one laptop use as a mean to enhance student-centered learning and inquiry.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed which examines how school administrators make financial decisions in regards to sustaining one-on-one laptop initiatives and how they manage conflict with teachers in respect to one-to-one laptop instruction.

Originality/value

Minimal literature exists which examines the challenges and vision of school technology leaders. Policy-makers and school administrators can use the findings to recreate teacher evaluation forms, develop conflict management strategies and teaching standards that are aligned and conducive to one-to-one laptop schools.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Ma Lei Hsieh and Hugh Holden

This paper aims to report on a study of an academic library's wireless laptop lending service. The authors believed that the unexpectedly low usage level of the Monmouth…

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1456

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on a study of an academic library's wireless laptop lending service. The authors believed that the unexpectedly low usage level of the Monmouth University Library's Laptop Lending Service (LLS) could best be understood by engaging the intended users of the LLS, that is, the students of Monmouth University, a small university in New Jersey. A formal, systematic survey would provide substantive data that would help the Library to evaluate this service and determine how well it meets the needs and expectations of students and answer the question, “Is it sufficient to provide wireless access?”

Design/methodology/approach

The open source application PHP Surveyor was used to construct two web‐based surveys which were conducted two years apart (2005 and 2007). An invitation to participate in the survey was emailed to all registered students. Follow‐up emails attended both surveys.

Findings

Among other things, it was learned that the fact that a large majority of the students believe that an LLS is a valuable service may not, in itself, assure a high level of usage. But also, a high level of personal laptop ownership among students does not necessarily lead to low demand for the service.

Practical implications

The useful information and ideas that we gained from these surveys could benefit libraries that are planning to implement laptop services, or wish to assess their existing services.

Originality/value

Few research studies on library laptop services have focused on the students' perspective. This study does that, but also, uniquely, made it possible to juxtapose results from various similar studies of students and a survey of academic librarians.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Hugh Holden and Ma Lei Hsieh

This paper seeks to learn, by way of a survey, what librarians at US colleges and universities were doing and the issues they were encountering as they considered…

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1184

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to learn, by way of a survey, what librarians at US colleges and universities were doing and the issues they were encountering as they considered, developed, or maintained wireless laptop computer lending programs (WLLP).

Design/methodology/approach

PHPSurveyor was used to construct a web‐based survey of librarians subscribed to any of 19 library‐related listservs. An invitation to participate in the survey was posted to each listserv on the same day.

Findings

Student usage of WLLPs ranged from extremely heavy to very light. Difficulties with library WLLPs were variously characterized as minor to stifling. Nevertheless, patterns emerged in the statistics as well as the additional comments given by many librarians. For example, librarians are much more ambivalent than the “experts” on the supposed cost savings generated by “going wireless”.

Practical implications

The results of this survey are useful to libraries planning their own WLLPs, providing insights into what to expect and what to account for, including (and beyond) equipment costs.

Originality/value

By comparing what was found by the two most relevant earlier studies with these new findings, this study provides a more current picture of WLLPs in academic libraries.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Joyce Chapman and David Woodbury

The purpose of this paper is to encourage administrators of device‐lending programs to leverage existing quantitative data for management purposes by integrating analysis…

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1810

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to encourage administrators of device‐lending programs to leverage existing quantitative data for management purposes by integrating analysis of quantitative data into the day‐to‐day workflow.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a case study of NCSU Libraries' efforts to analyze and visualize transactional data to aid in the on‐going management of a device‐lending program.

Findings

Analysis and visualization of qualitative data related to technology lending revealed patterns in lending over the course of the semester, day, and week that had previously gone unrecognized. With more concrete data about trends in wait times, capacity lending, and circulation volume, staff are now able to make more informed purchasing decisions, modify systems and workflows to better meet user needs, and begin to explore new ideas for services and staffing models.

Practical implications

The concepts and processes described here can be replicated by other libraries that wish to leverage transactional data analysis and data visualization to aid in management of a device‐lending program.

Originality/value

Although much literature exists on the implementation and qualitative evaluation of device‐lending programs, this paper is the first to provide librarians with ideas for leveraging analysis of transactional data to improve management of a device‐lending program.

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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Ravindra Chitturi

The purpose of this chapter is to explore the differences in consumers’ willingness to pay for different types of design attributes due to different levels of specific…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to explore the differences in consumers’ willingness to pay for different types of design attributes due to different levels of specific anticipatory emotions evoked by them. The research aims to show how firms can benefit by leveraging the findings that different types of design attributes – that is, functionality, aesthetics, and environmental sustainability – affect profit margin per unit differently. Further, the chapter claims that design is a core competency that can pay dividends in terms of profit margins for firms. It is important for firms to develop expertise in understanding and leveraging relationships between the types of design attributes, specific emotions, and consumers’ willingness to pay.

Methodology/approach

The chapter uses the product categories of cell phones and laptop computers in the three experiments to test the hypothesized relationships between design attributes (functionality, aesthetics, and environmental sustainability), specific emotions, and willingness to pay.

Findings

The research finds that different attributes of design – functionality, aesthetics, and sustainability – evoke different types of emotions and different levels of willingness to pay.

Research limitations/implications

The data were primarily collected via experiments in a behavioral laboratory.

Practical implications

Firms can leverage different attributes of design to position and price products according to emotional requirements of the target customer segment to match their willingness to pay and maximize profit margin per unit.

Originality/value

The research specifically measures willingness to pay in joint presentation – independent evaluation scenarios to assess differences in how functionality, aesthetics, and sustainability impact willingness to pay.

Details

Innovation and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-828-2

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