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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2020

Hoffer Lee and Libo Yan

A multidimensional scale was developed to measure the cuteness experience a destination can offer. In doing so, this paper attempts to explore the implications of the…

Abstract

Purpose

A multidimensional scale was developed to measure the cuteness experience a destination can offer. In doing so, this paper attempts to explore the implications of the cuteness aesthetics for destination marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

The procedure of scale development was followed. A survey was administered to a college student sample. The scale of cuteness experience was validated. A four-point scale turned out to be effective in terms of measurement.

Findings

The results show that cuteness experience of a destination consists of five dimensions: smallness, irregularity, roundness, lightness and creativity.

Research limitations/implications

The cuteness attributes have significant implications for promoting destinations to the East Asian markets, which have seen the rise of the cute culture in recent decades.

Originality/value

This study identified a unique selling point of destinations, namely, cuteness as a destination attribute. The study results also contribute to understanding of destination personality by drawing attention to the childlike personality trait: cuteness.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Claude Moulin

This paper will examine the importance of seeing, reading, evaluating and better appreciating the built environment. Creative observation of built environment is…

Abstract

This paper will examine the importance of seeing, reading, evaluating and better appreciating the built environment. Creative observation of built environment is fundamental to our day‐to‐day lives as well as to cultural tourism development. As we want to break away from the routine and lack of stimuli of our home work and environment, we travel to foreign places. Our cities are tourist destinations for others. Being aware of one's environment, and being able to read it should be a skill mastered by all. As many become a tourist at some point in their life, cultural tourism is judged essential to society's enrichment and to the personal enhancement of the tourist. Through methods of awareness, this process allows everyone to appreciate the built environment. None of the tourist charters, educational or initiatives adequately training cover these areas of concern. In response, this paper will explore the matters of perception, place and landscape reading, as well as visual or contextual appreciation as the basis for promotion of heritage conservation, cultural identity and sensitization to place specificities and uniqueness of landscapes. How to see and better appreciate these elements is what will progressively promote a conservation ethic in search of promising relationships between visitors and the built environment.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Maurice de Kleijn, Eduardo Dias and Gert-Jan Burgers

The purpose of this paper is to address the challenge for knowledge exchange between disciplines that study past urban landscapes, such as archaeologists, historians and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the challenge for knowledge exchange between disciplines that study past urban landscapes, such as archaeologists, historians and historical geographers and disciplines that work on new urban landscapes such as architects and spatial planners. It presents the design, deployment and evaluation of a heritage instrument, the “digital cultural biography” (DCB), which aims to allow future-oriented disciplines to make more historical and heritage informed decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper makes three contributions. First it presents a methodology to disseminate geographic information across disciplines by applying the biography of the landscape research strategy. Second it translates this methodology to a digital instrument, the DCB, which makes it possible to configure the historical and heritage features diachronically as well as spatially. And third it evaluates the added value of this instrument by organizing a design concourse and applying various evaluation methods. The Roman neighbourhood of Testaccio functions as the use case for this study.

Findings

The research shows a high potential to use digital tooling based on geospatial technologies to support the dialogue between future and past-oriented disciplines.

Originality/value

The paper discusses how the recently developed biography of the landscape method can be used as a tool for collaboration between heritage managers and spatial planners. Moreover, for the first time it applies and evaluates digital tools and geospatial technologies to support this approach.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2016

Karen Hughes

Effective interpretation of Australia’s unique landscapes has the potential to contribute to international tourists’ understanding of natural processes, as well as enhance…

Abstract

Effective interpretation of Australia’s unique landscapes has the potential to contribute to international tourists’ understanding of natural processes, as well as enhance their perceptions and appreciation of this environment. Research indicates that mystery, familiarity, and comprehension all influence how humans view landscapes and that preferences and perceptions are likely to be culturally determined. This chapter explores human perceptions of landscapes and highlights key differences in Western and Chinese approaches to experiencing and interpreting natural environments. It presents results of a study that used photo-elicitation to explore Chinese students’ perceptions of, and preferences for, six Australian landscapes. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the implications and recommendations for interpreting Australian landscapes for Chinese audiences.

Details

The World Meets Asian Tourists
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-219-1

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Libo Yan

The purpose of this paper is to apply what can be learned from the emergence of nature tourism to understand some current and future trends of tourism.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply what can be learned from the emergence of nature tourism to understand some current and future trends of tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted the evolutionary paradigm for investigation.

Findings

The emergence of nature tourism in early medieval China can be attributed to four major factors, including transformation of value orientations, seeking longevity, interest in suburbs and population migration.

Research limitations/implications

Historical studies help understand the current and future trends. When the contributing factors for nature tourism are linked to the contemporary world, it can be found that these factors are still playing a part in shaping tourism trends or patterns in their original or alternative forms. These trends or patterns are worthy of scholarly investigations.

Originality/value

This paper offers a comprehensive understanding of the origins of nature tourism.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2018

Tangwei Teng and Congyi Qu

In urban development, the difference of construction time series and the diversity of the aesthetic standard all lead to the fragmentation of the urban landscape and the…

Abstract

In urban development, the difference of construction time series and the diversity of the aesthetic standard all lead to the fragmentation of the urban landscape and the lack of effective integration. The research on urban landscape design based on sustainable development innovation was put forward in this paper. The background of the development of urban landscape design was expounded firstly, and the development status of urban landscape design under the concept of sustainable development innovation was introduced; then the urban landscape design method under the concept of sustainable development was put forward, and the urban landscape planning and design of a city was taken as an example and divided into three functional areas; in addition, the stereoscopic traffic planning, the landscape corridor design and the landscape design planning of water system were proposed. This study is of certain guiding significance for the actual urban landscape planning design.

Details

Open House International, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2007

Jill Franz

There is an urgent need in terms of changing world conditions to move beyond the dualist paradigm that has traditionally informed design research, education and practice…

Abstract

There is an urgent need in terms of changing world conditions to move beyond the dualist paradigm that has traditionally informed design research, education and practice. Rather than attempt to reduce uncertainty, novelty and complexity as is the conventional approach, an argument is presented in this article that seeks to exploit these qualities through a reconceptualisation of design in creative as well as systematic, rigorous and ethical terms. Arts‐based research, which ‘brings together the systematic and rigorous qualities of inquiry with the creative and imaginative qualities of the arts’, is presented as being central to this reconceptualisation. This is exemplified in the application of art‐informed inquiry in a research unit for graduating tertiary‐level interior design students. The application is described in this article and is shown to rely substantially on the image and its capacity to open up and reveal new possibilities and meaning.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Peter Williams

The ability of tourism regions to attract tourists depends to a great extent on the position of these destinations in the minds of key travel markets. The projection of an…

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1763

Abstract

The ability of tourism regions to attract tourists depends to a great extent on the position of these destinations in the minds of key travel markets. The projection of an appropriate image has been described as a vital element in the positioning process. This research examines the evolving character of wine tourism destination imagery as projected by wine producers and independent writers. The overriding research questions addressed in this paper are “What destination attributes are emphasised in the visual imagery of wine tourism regions, and how has the emphasis on those features varied over time?” The findings suggest that there has been a shift in wine country imagery from an emphasis on wine production processes and related facilities to move of a focus on aesthetic and experiential values associated with more leisurely recreational and tourist pursuits. Over the past decade, the wine tourism experience has become more positioned around the core attraction of a quality wine, accompanied by a set of natural landscape, culinary, educational, event hosting and cultural dimensions. The research identifies the need for a greater emphasis to be placed by wine tourism destinations on protecting rural landscapes, encouraging authentic and unique forms of development, and focusing imagery projection on those elements of the wine country experience which are central to the interests of wine tourists.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Tatiana Vadimovna Vakhitova

– The purpose of this paper is to suggest an approach to cultural heritage management as an inhabited cultural landscape in a context of urban planning.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest an approach to cultural heritage management as an inhabited cultural landscape in a context of urban planning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a review of academic literature on the topic of cultural heritage conservation.

Findings

This paper supports an approach to management of cultural heritage as a cultural landscape, defining it as a multivalent social phenomenon with tangible and intangible dimensions, spatial, and temporal scales. The cultural landscape approach continues the discourse on heritage values and emphasises the importance of recognition of social value and hence a wider stakeholder participation in the process of heritage management. This approach allows enhancing both intangible and tangible dimensions of cultural heritage and, therefore, encourages a more inclusive consideration of diverse cultural heritage values (encompassing social and environmental categories, e.g. well-being, health).

Originality/value

The proposed cultural landscape approach to heritage management, as a culturally significant, inhabited, and changing landscape, enables a more comprehensive view on the interrelations of cultural heritage with other social and environmental categories and enhances the understanding of different values of cultural heritage. This approach could be particularly useful for strategic development at city planning level and in large construction or infrastructural projects.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Linda Osti and Lucia Cicero

The purpose of this paper is to identify the perception of tourists towards positive and negative landscape features. Its objective is to classify rural tourists into…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the perception of tourists towards positive and negative landscape features. Its objective is to classify rural tourists into homogenous groups according to their sensitivity towards specific landscape characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

The work is based on quantitative data collection among tourists spending a vacation at agritourism farms. Altogether, 378 valid questionnaires were collected. A K-mean cluster analysis is conducted to group respondents into homogenous groups.

Findings

The research revealed that tourists particularly enjoy the presence of a landscape comprising orchards, flowery/grassy meadows and vineyards. In contrast, tourists find landscapes that reflects a neglected environment, views of factories and congested roads to be particularly unpleasant. This work has also identified the presence of three different clusters with distinct sensitivity towards landscape attributes: there are tourists who are highly sensitive to both positive and negative attributes, tourists who are highly sensitive to positive attributes but less sensitive to the negative attributes and tourists who are less sensitive to both the positive and the negative attributes.

Originality/value

When discussing issues related to the landscape, the question arises as to how and who should preserve and enhance the landscape for tourism reasons. The results of this research demonstrate that preserving and caring for the environment is imperative to the success of rural tourism.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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