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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2019

Juhadi Juhadi, Eva Banowati, Tjaturahono Budi Sanjoto and Satya Budi Nugraha

The purpose of this paper is to assess the land utilization in the erosion and landslide vulnerable mountainous region using the Rapid Appraisal for Agricultural Land…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the land utilization in the erosion and landslide vulnerable mountainous region using the Rapid Appraisal for Agricultural Land Utilization (RApALU) model.

Design/methodology/approach

A multidimensional RApALU model is used for sustainable agriculture land utilization.

Findings

Ecological dimension was less sustainable, whereas socio-economic, socio-cultural, and eco-technological dimensions were comparatively more sustainable. It was found from the analysis that 9 out of 21 attributes have sensitive effect on the sustainability index and status.

Practical implications

One of the implications of this research is that this model could be used to quickly measure the arrangement of an area that is experiencing environmental problems so that the land use planning process could be done more effectively and efficiently. The parameters used in each variable could be chosen by the researchers themselves according to location. As far as known by the researcher, the methods used have not been well integrated, they are still separated, for example, only physical problems, and social problems have not been measured properly. This model is not perfect yet, and it could be developed further because environmental problems are very complex and could be different from one location to another.

Originality/value

RApALU analysis can be used as preliminary analysis to comprehend general and overall description on the status of the sustainability index of land utilization for agriculture in hilly mountainous regions. The study confirmed that RApALU analysis can help determine the status of the sustainability of land utilization in intricate areas. This technique was able to comprehensively identify important factors affecting sustainability status of various dimensions.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Aleshia Huber

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458

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Reference Reviews, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Pradeep K. Rawat, C.C. Pant, P.C. Tiwari, P.D. Pant and A.K. Sharma

The main objective of the study is to identify the vulnerable areas for river‐line and flash flood hazard and its mitigation through GIS Database Management System (DBMS…

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1435

Abstract

Purpose

The main objective of the study is to identify the vulnerable areas for river‐line and flash flood hazard and its mitigation through GIS Database Management System (DBMS) of geo‐hydrometeorological parameters. The Dabka watershed constitutes a part of the Kosi Basin in the Lesser Himalaya, India in district Nainital has been selected for the case illustration.

Design/methodology/approach

The Dabka DBMS is constituted of three GIS (Geographic Information System) modules, i.e. geo‐informatics (consists of geomorphology, soils, geology and land use pattern, slope analysis, drainage density and drainage frequency), weather informatics (consists of daily, monthly and annual weather data about temperature, rainfall, humidity and evaporation) and hydro‐informatics (consist of runoff, sediment delivery, and denudation). The geo‐informatics and weather informatics modules carried out by comprehensive field work and GIS mapping than both modules used to carry out hydro‐informatics module. Through the integration and superimposing of spatial data and attribute data with their GIS layers of all these modules prepared Flood Hazard Index (FHI) to identify the level of vulnerability for flood hazards and their socio‐economic and environmental risks.

Findings

The results suggest that geo‐environmentally most stressed areas of barren land (i.e. river‐beds, flood plain, denudational hills, sites of debris flow, gullies, landslide prone areas etc.) have extreme vulnerability for flood hazard due to high rate of runoff, sediment load delivery and denudation during rainy season (i.e. respectively 84.56 l/s/km2, 78.60 t/km2 and 1.21 mm/year) whereas in geo‐environmentally least stressed dense forest areas (i.e. oak, pine and mixed forests) have low vulnerability due to low rate of stream runoff, sediment load delivery and denudation (i.e. respectively 20.67 l/s/km2, 19.50 t/km2 and 0.20 mm/year). The other frazzled geo‐environment which also found high vulnerable for flood hazard and their risks is agricultural land areas due to high rate of stream runoff, sediment load delivery and denudation rates (i.e. respectively 53.15 l/s/km2, 90.00 t/km2 and 0.92 mm/year).

Research limitations/implications

For hydro‐informatics module it is quite difficult to monitor water and sediment discharge data from each and every stream of the Himalayan terrain due the steep and rugged topography. It requires strategic planning and trained man power as well as sufficient funds; therefore representative micro‐watershed approach of varied ecosystem followed for a three years (2006‐2008) period.

Practical implications

The study will have great scientific relevance in the field of river‐line flood and flash flood hazard and its socio‐economic and environmental risks prevention and management in Himalaya and other mountainous terrain of the world.

Originality/value

This study generated primary data on hydro‐informatics and weather informatics to integrate with geo‐informatics data for flood hazard assessment and mitigation as constitutes a part of multidisciplinary project, Department of Science and Technology (D.S.T.) Government of India.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2011

John Goodier

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118

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Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2015

Abstract

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Knowing, Becoming, Doing as Teacher Educators: Identity, Intimate Scholarship, Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-140-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

S. Agrawal, J.P. Antunes, E. Theron, M. Truscott and D.J. de Beer

The purpose of the present work is to develop a methodology for making physical models of catchment areas and terrains by rapid prototyping (RP) using geographic…

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1327

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present work is to develop a methodology for making physical models of catchment areas and terrains by rapid prototyping (RP) using geographic information systems (GIS) data. It is also intended to reduce data loss by minimising intermediate data translations.

Design/methodology/approach

The GIS data of a catchment area or a terrain were directly translated to an stereo lithography (STL) file. The STL surface was then manipulated in Magics‐RP to obtain a solid STL part, which can then be downloaded to a RP machine to obtain a physical model or representation of a terrain or catchtment area.

Findings

Intricate geometries of landforms were created with ease and great accuracy in RP machines. Terrain models were created in less time and lower cost than with conventional methods.

Research limitations/implications

DEM ASCII XYZ (digital elevation model) data were used to input the required GIS data of specific terrains. Software can be developed for translation and manipulation of DEM, STL and other relevant file formats. This will eliminate any data loss associated with intermediate file transfer.

Practical implications

Terrain models were created with ease and great accuracy in RP machines. It takes less time and can be done more cost‐effectively. Terrain models have intricate geometries and for complex models, it may take months to make using conventional methods.

Originality/value

STL surfaces were obtained directly from GIS data for terrain modeling. This work fulfils the need of terrain modeling for catchment management, town‐planning, road‐transport planning, architecture, military applications, geological education, etc.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Daryl W. Cowell

Approaches to land use planning have gone through considerable evolution during the past 30 years. Western nations have learned hard lessons about the consequences of not…

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1629

Abstract

Approaches to land use planning have gone through considerable evolution during the past 30 years. Western nations have learned hard lessons about the consequences of not considering ecological process and structures when undertaking land use planning, development, and when harvesting resources. As a result, modern concepts of conservation biology and landscape level planning have developed and are beginning to be implemented in North America, Europe, Australia and portions of South America. An approach to ecological based landscape planning, as developed through several applications in Canada, is discussed. The approach incorporates principles of conservation biology and relies heavily on abiotic landscape components for mapping and interpretation. Landscape planning is defined and discussed according to three key components: (1) the planning framework; (2) ecological analysis; and (3) implementation of the whole. The planning framework includes the goals and objectives of the plan which is based on prevailing socio‐cultural values. The analysis attempts to determine full landscale representivity then maximize ecological integrity.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1977

David D. Ginsburg

Geology itself is a descriptive science (i.e., the description of landforms, rocks, etc.). To apply these observations geology depends heavily on the other sciences for…

Abstract

Geology itself is a descriptive science (i.e., the description of landforms, rocks, etc.). To apply these observations geology depends heavily on the other sciences for data, theories, etc. Thus the geologist is very much dependent on works in chemistry, physics and biology (depending on his particular area of interest) in addition to those discussed here, and the reader is referred to the surveys in those fields.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Yukiko Takeuchi and Rajib Shaw

Japan is an island arc that sits in the monsoon region, and is under the influence of warm and moist air masses in summer and cool air masses in winter. The moisture that…

Abstract

Japan is an island arc that sits in the monsoon region, and is under the influence of warm and moist air masses in summer and cool air masses in winter. The moisture that is taken in the lower leaves of the air masses over the sea is poured on the country by typhoons in summer, by snowfall in winter, by the “Bai-u Front” (in Japanese) in June and July, and by depressions and fronts in all seasons. Owing to Japan's slender shape and complicated landform, aerial differences in climate are great. Japan is located on the eastern edge of the monsoonal region of Asia, and its climate varies according to seasonal and regional conditions. Typically, heavy rains occur in various parts of the country, both during the rainy season in June and July and during the typhoon season from August to October. This precipitation is predominantly in the form of locally specific temporary downpours. In winter, the northern part of the country usually receives heavy snowfall that causes prolonged floods in spring from the melting of snow. The average amount of precipitation is 1,800mm (70 inches) a year. This is two or three times the amount received in other areas of the same latitude. In the southern Pacific coast areas, rainfall amounts to 4,000mm (160 inches). Precipitation in Tokyo is twice as much as other large cities in western countries. Some 50–60% of the annual precipitation in the Pacific coast of Japan is concentrated from June to October. Artificial changes in natural environments are rapid and large, accompanying the great increase in economic activity and exploitation (Nakano, Kadomura, Mizutani, Okuda, & Sekiguchi, 1974). Although the country's 10% of land area is flood prone, about 50% of the population lives in floodplains and almost 75% of the property is concentrated in the floodplains (JWF, 2006).

Details

Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction: An Asian Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-485-7

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Ashish Kumar Singh

The purpose of this paper is to attempt to generate a better, systematic and scientific understanding of the basic reasons behind slope instability to help in developing…

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1424

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to attempt to generate a better, systematic and scientific understanding of the basic reasons behind slope instability to help in developing the basic principles of landslide hazard zonation, monitoring and forecasting of landslide hazards for better and more effective landslide hazard mitigation and management.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on extensive field observations and intensive reviews of literature from secondary sources.

Findings

Mass movements especially landslides as they are known to common man are a recurring natural phenomenon and are an integral part of any geological/geomorphological circle of landform development through sequential development of slopes in any elevated region and especially in young fold mountain chains.

Practical implications

The paper presents a valuable insight into the basic reasons behind a landslide to spread awareness, to educate and sensitize people towards better and effective landslide hazard mitigation and thereby ensure people's participation in disaster management. It also aims to initiate and encourage research in the field of landslide management.

Originality/value

Landslides occur frequently and without any appreciable warning as such causing havoc and often insurmountable damage to life and property but despite their uncertainty, their causative factors and indicators of slope instability are very well known to an extent that the magnitude of these events, susceptible areas, the timing of such events and their potential impact can be studied, analyzed and evaluated on the basis of past occurrences and existing knowledge to mitigate their impact. The real value of the present study is to minimize losses due to landslides through better knowledge and enhanced levels of understanding of the phenomenon and its management by simply avoiding those particular reasons that could lead to slope instability problems.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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