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Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Bharat Mehra and Joseph Winberry

This chapter explores “politic talks” (also known as political information) on the websites of academic libraries in land-grant state universities of the South in the…

Abstract

This chapter explores “politic talks” (also known as political information) on the websites of academic libraries in land-grant state universities of the South in the context of a global retreat of democracy that emerged during former President Trump’s regime as the 45th President of the United States. The exploratory qualitative evaluation applies website content analysis of seven information offerings in three categories that include: (1) information sources (collections, resources), information policy and planning (assigned role, strategic representation), and connections (internal, external, news and events). Promising practices and illustrative examples of “politic talks” representation on academic library websites show how they are serving as significant providers of political information during current politically turbulent times. The discussion of these findings in relation to each state’s voting likelihood based on trends since 2000 has significant political implications in enhancing the role of academic libraries moving forward.

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Libraries and the Global Retreat of Democracy: Confronting Polarization, Misinformation, and Suppression
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-597-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1960

Francis Aylward

FEW ACTS OF CONGRESS have had such profound effects as that sponsored by Senator Morrill of Vermont and signed by President Lincoln on 2nd July 1862, in the middle of the…

Abstract

FEW ACTS OF CONGRESS have had such profound effects as that sponsored by Senator Morrill of Vermont and signed by President Lincoln on 2nd July 1862, in the middle of the Civil War.

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Education + Training, vol. 2 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

R. Wes Harrison and P. Lynn Kennedy

The importance of high value products as a component of United States agricultural output has increased significantly in recent years. Moreover, high value products as a…

Abstract

The importance of high value products as a component of United States agricultural output has increased significantly in recent years. Moreover, high value products as a percentage of U.S. agricultural exports have also risen (Burfisher and Missiaen, 1990). Given these trends, it is not surprising that agribusiness competitiveness has become a topic of much discussion in both the popular press and in academic literature. Its importance is also evidenced by initiatives set forth by the Western Regional Coordinating Committee on Agribusiness Research Emphasizing Competitiveness and the International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium symposium Competitiveness in International Food Markets. More recently, the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges' Board on Agriculture endorsed the Agricultural Competitiveness Initiative (ACI). This initiative calls on land‐grant universities to consider new paradigms for conducting research, extension, and teaching on the issue of U.S. agricultural competitiveness.

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Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Stephen E. Condrey

Ascertains the viability of adapting the American university‐based public service concept to countries of the former Soviet Union. Toward this end, a heuristic model is…

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968

Abstract

Ascertains the viability of adapting the American university‐based public service concept to countries of the former Soviet Union. Toward this end, a heuristic model is presented. The model for university‐based public service and outreach shows initial viability in the Ukrainian examples. While the range of administrative and societal problems facing the Ukraine and other countries of the former Soviet Union is formidable, it appears that university‐based public service activities can play a part in reform activities aimed at their amelioration.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Hei-hang Hayes Tang

The purpose of this paper is to undertake an inquiry into the way academic entrepreneurialism manifests itself in the changing discourses of the notion of “scholarship”…

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189

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to undertake an inquiry into the way academic entrepreneurialism manifests itself in the changing discourses of the notion of “scholarship”. It particularly examines the contexts, rationales, definitions and implications of the discursive field of the “scholarship of application”. The global trend of academic entrepreneurialism profoundly affects the organisation of higher education institutions and academic life. Particularly, the form of scholarship has been undergoing subtle but constant transformation. The emergence of knowledge economies worldwide influences the practices and goals of traditional academy and illustrates commitment for fundamental knowledge and the new economies emphasise the results and impacts brought by applied knowledge. Alongside the “scholarship of discovery”, the “scholarship of application” is given attention.

Design/methodology/approach

By reviewing the related literature, this paper articulates the definitions and dimensions of the “scholarship of application”. In addition, the impacts brought about by the concerned academic and policy discourses will be discussed.

Findings

This paper finds that the emergence of the discursive field of the “scholarship of application” – as well as the discussions and actions in response to it – coincide with the intense neoliberal changes that affected traditional academia in the 1990s. It is argued that the emergence of and subsequent responses to the discursive field of the “scholarship of application” resulted in transforming purposes and practices of academic life. The discursive field of the “scholarship of application” also impacts on the concerned academic and policy discourses.

Originality/value

To sustain the advancement of the scholarship of application, this paper implies the need to develop practices, cultivate culture as well as formulate prestige and reward mechanisms inherent to the existing higher education systems.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Young Ha Cho

This paper aims to measure and rigorously compare the perceptions of South Korean university social engagement between faculty and students, two definitive stakeholders…

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1587

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to measure and rigorously compare the perceptions of South Korean university social engagement between faculty and students, two definitive stakeholders identified by stakeholder theory – but considerably heterogeneous, to understand how South Korean campus embraces social engagement in practice. To that end, this study delves into the conceptual framework of university social engagement and selects a highly internationalized, research-oriented, four-year comprehensive South Korean university campus that has long sought to become engaged in communities as the research site.

Design/methodology/approach

Methodologically, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to identify the factor model that successfully fit the data of the study. Factorial invariance tests and latent mean analysis were then conducted to measure and strictly compare the between-group mean differences.

Findings

According to the findings, neither faculty nor students had positive perceptions of their institution’s social engagement in terms of leadership, participatory decision-making, curriculum and instruction, institutional supports and systemic mechanism. That is, two definitive stakeholders on campus similarly perceived that social engagement has not yet been institutionalized as a core value and therefore embraced in practice. Based on these findings, this study discussed several implications for university decision makers. Specifically, the institutionalization of and the need for authentic leadership in university social engagement were emphasized as a means to encourage and facilitate the delivery of practical, beneficial services to the public.

Research limitations/implications

As with all studies, there are certain limitations that must be noted. The sample for this study represents the experiences and expectations of faculty and students at only one institution. Therefore, the experiences of individuals at this single university are not necessarily representative of all South Korean universities. In addition, given that the public service missions of South Korean universities emanated from Western thoughts (Duke, 2008; Ward, 2003), social engagement in the present study has been discussed and conceptualized according to the dominant Western scholarship.

Practical implications

As both faculty and students similarly perceived, participatory decision-making and systemic mechanism do not work properly, and therefore, social engagement as an institutional value cannot strongly take root on campus. Based on the scale used, this study identified communication and organizational supports as the likely issues that obstruct the institutionalization of social engagement. In relation to communication, Boyte and Hollander (1999) emphasize that it is important that stakeholders are well aware of the engaged effort of the institution. Then, the voices of stakeholders need to be acknowledged as valuable feedback so that university decision makers and stakeholders can discuss mutually important issues and concerns (Minnesota Higher Education Services Office, 2003). Furthermore, the relevant literature consistently contends that engaged effort can only be productive with continuous and systemic organizational supports (Boyte and Hollander, 1999; Holland, 1997; Minnesota Higher Education Services Office, 2003; Weerts and Sandmann, 2008). That is, the engaged work of teaching, research and service should be thoroughly assessed and reported to stakeholders on a regular basis. The implication in this study is that university decision makers should make greater effort to design and implement policies and regulations that enable organizational supports to continue.

Social implications

For social engagement to be valued in practice, the relevant literature (Kellogg Commission, 1999; Garlick and Langworthy, 2008; Minnesota Higher Education Services Office, 2003; Peterson, 2009) advises that top institutional leaders need to encourage interdisciplinary scholarship that includes research, teaching and learning; develop incentives to encourage faculty involvement in engaged work; support engagement so that it is incorporated into the curriculum and instruction; and secure funding for engagement. The fundamental insight that these suggestions provide to university decision makers is crystal-clear: social engagement must be authentically prioritized in the decision-making process.

Originality/value

The quantitative and descriptive findings of the study seek to provide one further step toward the objective of establishing the groundwork for future research on university social engagement in Asian context. Further, replication studies with various Asian cases and research designs may results in tangible improvements to the theorization of Asian university social engagement.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Richard N. Ottaway

The cultural differences between British and American managersobserved while teaching applied psychology to classes of bothnationalities are discussed. Each group was…

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1319

Abstract

The cultural differences between British and American managers observed while teaching applied psychology to classes of both nationalities are discussed. Each group was taught materials with a dominant cognitive and affective focus in university and management development courses. Two categories of differences are identified: personal perspectives and educational philosophy. Under personal perspectives, the influence of the future orientation of the Americans and the past orientation of the British are considered. These differences may account for the desire of subjective learning experiences on the part of the Americans and objective experiences for the British. The past and future orientation may also account for the interest in Freudian theories applied to management education in Britain and the humanistic school in America. It is concluded that the educational philosophies are very different, with the Americans having a very utilitarian view of education, dating back to the Land Grant colleges and the acceptance of part‐time students.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Leonard Waks and Eric Sandelands

In interview format this paper provides an introduction to the US education system for the non‐American faculty member, focusing primarily on the university sector. Issues…

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585

Abstract

In interview format this paper provides an introduction to the US education system for the non‐American faculty member, focusing primarily on the university sector. Issues addressed include: key differences inherent in the US system (versus the majority of the world); the structure of education; the role of the individual states and that of the federal government; funding; accreditation; faculty assessment and promotion; and the practicalities of teaching for an American university.

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Education + Training, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

Greg MacLeod, Bruce McFarlane and Charles H. Davis

Posits that most contemporary interest in the university‐industry linkages stems from a concern to increase the birth rate of new technology‐based firms and/or the…

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10510

Abstract

Posits that most contemporary interest in the university‐industry linkages stems from a concern to increase the birth rate of new technology‐based firms and/or the velocity with which indigenous scientific capability is translated into commercial technologies. Notes that many analysts of science parks and silicon valleys argue that this kind of knowledge‐based innovation requires cosmopolitan economic and social milieux with good communication links, easy access to air transport, highly educated workers and sophisticated cultural amenities. Argues that on the receiving end of contemporary innovation systems are indigenous and other disempowered groups and economically depleted communities with little stake in scientific and technical advancement and virtually no involvement in the policy or social networks set up to steer the knowledge system. Describes an experiment to discover processes by which marginalized, economically distressed communities can use institutions of the “knowledge economy” to foster the social and technological innovation necessary for their survival. Joins the University College of Cape Breton with universities in Mexico to form structured relationships with communities on Cape Breton Island and with a Mayan community on the Yucatán Peninsula. Bases techniques on searching for economic opportunities, construction of community business organizations, training, community development and supportive aftercare services to provide the three components of community economic regeneration: finance, technology and formation. Works to find ways to use the dynamics of triple helix innovation to construct knowledge systems that work in favour of the peripheral communities threatened by trade liberalization and the decline of resource regions. Specifically asks how can the institutions of the “knowledge economy” contribute to the development of a local sub‐economy that supports local businesses? Employs a social economy approach to the establishment of community businesses, differing from others in the community business movement in the belief that the “knowledge economy” can provide resources and eventual economic and social survivability to distressed regions. Argues that economic regeneration among marginal groups requires: access to improved production and organizational technologies; that universities can provide this access, especially in distressed communities; a transfer system usually has to be established; specific steps must be taken to establish new community businesses; and a maintenance system with specific characteristics must be established.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 24 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Lee E. Nordstrum, Paul G. LeMahieu and Elaine Berrena

This paper is one of seven in this volume elaborating upon different approaches to quality improvement in education. This paper aims to delineate a methodology called…

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1112

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is one of seven in this volume elaborating upon different approaches to quality improvement in education. This paper aims to delineate a methodology called Implementation Science, focusing on methods to enhance the reach, adoption, use and maintenance of innovations and discoveries in diverse education contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the origins, theoretical foundations, core principles and a case study showing an application of Implementation Science in education, namely, in promoting school–community–university partnerships to enhance resilience (PROSPER).

Findings

Implementation Science is concerned with understanding and finding solutions to the causes of variation in a program’s outcomes relating to its implementation. The core phases are: initial considerations about the host context; creating an implementation structure; sustaining the structure during implementation; and improving future applications.

Originality/value

Few theoretical treatments and demonstration cases are currently available on commonly used models of quality improvement in other fields that might have potential value in improving education systems internationally. This paper fills this gap by elucidating one promising approach. The paper also derives value, as it permits a comparison of the Implementation Science approach with other quality improvement approaches treated in this volume.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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