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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Murugesh Arunachalam, Jagdeep Singh-Ladhar and Andrea McLachlan

This paper aims to examine the planning and policy processes in relation to the pollution in Lake Taupo. This paper describes and explains the manifestation of the tenets…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the planning and policy processes in relation to the pollution in Lake Taupo. This paper describes and explains the manifestation of the tenets of deliberative democracy and the impediments of mobilising the tenets in the planning and policy-making processes.

Design/methodology/approach

This interpretive case study makes sense of interview transcripts, minutes of meetings, media reports and public documents and adopts deliberative democratic theory as the theoretical framework for the interpretive analysis.

Findings

Some factors fostered and others challenged the mobilization of the tenets of deliberative democracy. Local government processes facilitated the expression of multiple views in relation to the impacts of human activities on the Lake. Confrontations and tensions were inevitable elements of the deliberative processes. Pre-determined outcomes and domination of local authorities, aiming for environmental sustainability of Lake Taupo, posed as challenges to the operation of deliberative democracy. Some stakeholders need to sacrifice more than others, but recognition of pluralism, conflicts and differences is an essential part of deliberative democracy.

Originality/value

There is scarcity of research that empirically examines local government processes in light of deliberative democratic principles. The study also extends environmental and social studies that have explored the arena approach to accountability and decision-making.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Sreenivasa Rao Amaraneni, Sarnam Singh and P.K. Joshi

Kolleru Lake, a wetland located in India, is one of the largest natural freshwater lakes and is an important sanctuary for indigenous and migratory birds, particularly in…

Abstract

Kolleru Lake, a wetland located in India, is one of the largest natural freshwater lakes and is an important sanctuary for indigenous and migratory birds, particularly in winter seasons. The lake is located between latitudes 16°32′ and 16°47′N and longitudes 81°05′ and 81°27′E. The lake is connected to the sea through the Upputeru River, at a distance of 60 km. The lake water is mainly used for drinking water, agriculture, fishing and aquaculture purposes. The lake ecosystem is deteriorating due to the industrial, agricultural and aquacultural activities. High volume sampler was used for the collection of air pollutants, namely suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide from the lake at four locations over a period of one year. Water samples were collected from the lake in three seasons in a year over a period of three years and analyzed for water quality parameter, namely total suspended solids, hardness, chloride, sodium, chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand. The aim of this study is to create the air and water pollution maps of Kolleru Lake using geographic information systems (GIS) for the better management of Kolleru Lake to control the pollution and also to avoid the risk of air and water pollutants on humans, aquatic organisms, birds and plants.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Michael James Tumbare

The purpose of this paper is to communicate and share experiences with stakeholders on how the sustainability threats and challenges associated with managing Lake Kariba…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to communicate and share experiences with stakeholders on how the sustainability threats and challenges associated with managing Lake Kariba and the Kariba Dam wall are being managed by the Zambezi River Authority (ZRA).

Design/methodology/approach

The case study area is Lake Kariba and Kariba Dam wall located in the mid‐Zambezi river basin. The data and information for the case study is from ZRAs own records.

Findings

The case study concludes that the threats and challenges so far experienced have been mitigated adequately with management programmes and tools having been put in place. However, a lot still needs to be done to improve the socio‐economic living conditions of the displaced Tonga/Korekore people.

Originality/value

Lake Kariba was created in the late 1950s to provide water primarily for hydro‐power production. However, this water resource now serves many users and has its sustainability threats; invasive weeds, water pollution, cyclic drought and flood events, the competing uses and multiple legislative provisions. The Kariba Dam wall, as an engineering structure, has its own sustainability challenges; effects of alkaline aggregate reaction, the spillway plunge pool stability and the general ageing of the dam structure. The Tonga/Korekore people, who were displaced on both banks of the Zambezi River when Kariba Dam was built, still feel short‐changed. Stakeholders will be able to associate and relate to similar threats, challenges and experiences and use the management solutions being applied at Kariba. The opinions and conclusions drawn in this case study are those of the author.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

W.A. Brock and W.D. Dechert

The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of optimal management of ecosystems by developing a dynamic model of strategic behavior by users/communities of an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of optimal management of ecosystems by developing a dynamic model of strategic behavior by users/communities of an ecosystem such as a lake, which is subject to pollution resulting from the users. More specifically, it builds a model of two ecosystems that are spatially connected.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the techniques of optimal control theory and game theory.

Findings

The paper uncovers sufficient conditions under which the analysis of the dynamic game can be converted to an optimal problem for a pseudo authority. It is shown that if the discount rate on the future is high enough relative to ecological self‐restoration parameters then multiple stable states appear. In this case, if the pollution level is high enough it is too costly in terms of what must be given up today to restore the damaged system. By using computational methods, the paper evaluates the relative strengths of lack of coordination, strength of ecosystem self‐cleaning forces, size of discount rates, etc.

Originality/value

The methodology as well as findings can help to devise an optimal management strategy over time for ecosystems.

Details

Indian Growth and Development Review, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8254

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 1 December 2009

Bryan T. Stinchfield

In 2007, BP sought and received regulatory approval to expand operations at its Whiting Refinery in northwest Indiana. Had the project gone forward as planned, the…

Abstract

In 2007, BP sought and received regulatory approval to expand operations at its Whiting Refinery in northwest Indiana. Had the project gone forward as planned, the refinery would have discharged significantly higher levels of pollutants into Lake Michigan, but would have also contributed to economic development in the region. The result of BP seeking and being granted regulatory approval triggered a firestorm of controversy from multiple segments of society. This case study draws from secondary sources to examine the positions of a variety of stakeholders who influenced BP's decision as to whether or not it should expand its Whiting Refinery. Relevant stakeholders included for analysis are citizen and environmental organizations, political groups, trade associations, BP's employees, and stockholders. The intended target audience for this case is upper-level undergraduate business students studying issues related to business and society, such as corporate social responsibility and sustainable development.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Godfrey Smart

The ESPRIT Project SIMPR developed software to analyse documents and generate indexes for them. Of immediate application as a document indexing and classification system…

Abstract

The ESPRIT Project SIMPR developed software to analyse documents and generate indexes for them. Of immediate application as a document indexing and classification system, this also offers a technology for information modelling that has broader implications, supporting many new uses for information management software. The Project was based on the assumption that information can only be managed successfully by computer systems that can view the information contained in a document through the language in which the document is written, and that systems need to be sufficiently flexible to respond to the changing requirements of document use.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Xie Yongming

Presents a survey of water, water pollution and control in China.Water shortage and water pollution are two of the most importantenvironmental problems and factors…

Abstract

Presents a survey of water, water pollution and control in China. Water shortage and water pollution are two of the most important environmental problems and factors affecting the development of industry, agriculture and the economy. China has made great efforts to improve environmental quality and has issued a series of important policies and regulations since the 1970s. Water saving and waste water reuse are the most significant measures implemented for solving the water shortage and controlling water pollution. All these policies and measures are playing an important role in alleviating and controlling the extent of water pollution.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2010

Shimpei Iwasaki and Rajib Shaw

Songkhla Lake is the largest lake in Thailand along the Bay of Thailand, situated at latitude 7°08′ and 7°50′ north and longitude 100°07′ and 100°37′ east (Fig. 4.1). The…

Abstract

Songkhla Lake is the largest lake in Thailand along the Bay of Thailand, situated at latitude 7°08′ and 7°50′ north and longitude 100°07′ and 100°37′ east (Fig. 4.1). The lake covers an area of approximately 1,042km2, and consists of four interconnected lake ecosystems (Ratanachai & Sutiwipakorn, 2005): Thale Noi (approximately 27km2), Thale Luang (approximately 473km2), Thale Sap (approximately 360km2), and Thale Sap Songkhla (approximately 182km2).

Details

Integrated Lagoon Fisheries Management: Resource Dynamics and Adaptation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-164-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1991

Han Guogang, Jiang Fenglan and Yan Jimin

The problems of water supply of China in 2000 are revealed bystatistical data. It is shown that 450 cities will be short of freshwater; a great quantity is utilised in…

Abstract

The problems of water supply of China in 2000 are revealed by statistical data. It is shown that 450 cities will be short of fresh water; a great quantity is utilised in agriculture much of which can be saved; groundwater is over‐extracted; the level of water is falling by an average of 1‐2mu each year which has caused the subsiding of regional earth; the quality of drinking water and of water utilised in industry becomes poorer; water resources are polluted because of the increase in organic pollutants, the number and size of cities, the pollution of nutrient and colon bacillus, the decrease in the area of lakes, the shortage of money for administration, the amount of polluted water drained without efficient treatment, the low re‐utilisation ratio of water, and the low rate of sewerage system development.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 18 no. 8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2007

Ben Groom, Andreas Kontoleon and Tim Swanson

An experiment is undertaken to assess how the level of information provided to survey groups impacts upon the decisions they make. In this experiment, a group of experts…

Abstract

An experiment is undertaken to assess how the level of information provided to survey groups impacts upon the decisions they make. In this experiment, a group of experts is surveyed first to determine both the forms and levels of information important to them regarding an obscure environmental resource (remote mountain lakes), as well as their ranking of particular examples of these resources in accordance with their own criteria. Then three different groups of respondents are given different levels of this information to assess how their WTP for the resources responds to varying levels of this information, and how their rankings of the different goods alters with the information provided. The study reports evidence that generally increased levels of information provide significant quantitative changes in aggregate WTP (the enhancement effect), as well as a credible impact on their ranking of the various goods. On closer examination, much of the enhancement effect appears to be attributable to the changes in ranking, and to changes in the WTP for a single lake at each level of information. In addition the ranking does not respond in any consistent or coherent fashion during the experiment until the information provided is complete, including a ranking of subjectively reported importance by the expert group, and then the survey group converges upon the expert's group rankings. In sum, the experiment generates evidence that is both consistent with the anticipated effects of increased levels of information but also consistent with the communication of information-embedded preferences of the expert group. It may not be possible to communicate expert-provided information to survey groups without simultaneously communicating their preferences.

Details

Research in Law and Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-455-3

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