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1 – 9 of 9
Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

MiRan Kim, Laee Choi, Carl P. Borchgrevink, Bonnie Knutson and JaeMin Cha

This study aims to examine the effects of employee voice (EV) and team-member exchange (TMX) on employee job satisfaction (EJS) and affective commitment to an organization…

1263

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effects of employee voice (EV) and team-member exchange (TMX) on employee job satisfaction (EJS) and affective commitment to an organization among Gen Y employees of hotel companies in the USA and China.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a Qualtrics panel, a self-administered online survey was completed by Gen Y hotel employees in the USA and China. Multiple-group structural equation modeling analysis examined relative moderating effects on the proposed framework.

Findings

The effect of EV on EJS was greater in China than in the USA. However, Gen Y hotel employees in the USA who experience high-quality TMX are more likely to have greater EJS than they would in China.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies need to be carried out in other hospitality sectors or non-hospitality business areas with different cross-national contexts.

Practical implications

Chinese hotel managers need to develop effective ways to encourage Gen Y EV. To promote TMX of Gen Y employees in the USA, supporting team-oriented projects and/or evaluations can be an effective way.

Originality/value

This study advances previous cross-cultural studies by focusing on a generation subculture. It makes significant contributions to the hospitality literature, as it is the first among research studies that examines Gen Y employees’ extra-role behavior (EV) and TMX across different national cultures: the USA vs China.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Thomas A. Burnham, Garret Ridinger, Anne Carpenter and Laee Choi

Consumers who share their suggestions with firms contribute valuable knowledge and both exhibit and reinforce positive customer engagement. Yet, the motivational…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumers who share their suggestions with firms contribute valuable knowledge and both exhibit and reinforce positive customer engagement. Yet, the motivational antecedents of direct-to-firm customer suggestion sharing remain understudied. This study aims to investigate how potential self, other customer and firm benefits motivate consumer suggestion sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical incident pretest explores the domain and establishes ecological validity. Two scenario-based experimental studies test the proposed relationships in distinct service contexts.

Findings

Results support a prosocial (helpful) view of suggestion sharing – potential benefits to other customers motivate suggestion sharing. Potential benefits for the firm play two roles, namely, they indirectly motivate suggestion sharing by increasing consumers’ perceived outcome expectancy, illustrating a pragmatic mechanism, and they directly motivate suggestion sharing when service quality is high, illustrating a conditional, reciprocity-driven mechanism. When service quality is low, consumers are less likely to share firm-benefitting suggestions and more likely to share non-beneficial suggestions, highlighting a potential low service quality “trap” in which firms can become stuck.

Research limitations/implications

Future research is needed to study the antecedents of attitude toward suggestion sharing and the effect of relationship strength on suggestion sharing.

Practical implications

Managerially, multiple paths are identified by which firms can motivate suggestion sharing. The low-service quality “trap” indicates that low-service quality firms should not rely on, and should perhaps even ignore, customer suggestions as a tool for improving their offerings.

Originality/value

By experimentally investigating the motivational antecedents of direct-to-firm consumer suggestion sharing, this paper fills a gap in extant research and provides a foundation upon which future suggestion sharing research can build.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Laee Choi and Sherry Lotz

The purpose of this study is to better understand customer citizenship behavior (CCB) motivation through the development and validation of a new scale to measure the CCB…

2211

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to better understand customer citizenship behavior (CCB) motivation through the development and validation of a new scale to measure the CCB motivation (CCBM) construct.

Design/methodology/approach

The mixed-methods study, combination of qualitative and quantitative research, is used to develop the scale item that measures CCBM. For nomological validity testing, data were collected from customers who had transacted with a specific service provider business in the past six months. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

This study suggests that CCBM can be reliably measured by 12 items, composed of four sub-dimensions, self-enhancement, personal principles, desire to support the service provider and perception of the service provider’s past performance. In addition, nomological validity testing through three empirical models confirms that CCBM is a multi-dimensional construct with a second-order nature and an antecedent that positively influences CCB.

Originality/value

The research provides an original view regarding CCBM scale development in the services contexts and makes invaluable contributions to understanding a variety of motivations that lead customers to voluntary participation behaviors.

Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

MiRan Kim, Laee Choi, Bonnie J. Knutson and Carl P. Borchgrevink

This study aims to examine the relationships among leader–member exchange (LMX), employee voice, team–member exchange (TMX), employee job satisfaction and employee…

1317

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationships among leader–member exchange (LMX), employee voice, team–member exchange (TMX), employee job satisfaction and employee commitment to customer service (ECCS) across the USA and Chinese cultures within the hotel context.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was completed by hotel employees across the USA (n = 315) and China (n = 363). The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings of this study imply that the relationships among constructs between two nations are very similar, with a few significant differences. Specifically, this study shows that there are significant differences between the USA and China regarding the effects of LMX on employee voice, TMX, job satisfaction and ECCS.

Research limitations/implications

The research should be extended with more than two national cultures to increase the generalizability of the research findings. Primary implication is that leader in China, and the USA should seek to build LMX quality to reap organizational benefits.

Practical implications

This study can help global hospitality firms develop management strategies effectively.

Originality/value

The study’s findings provide researchers with a better understanding of the LMX framework across USA and Chinese cultures. It also verifies the underlying relational effects among LMX and its outcomes across different nations, thus offering global hospitality organizations best management practices across cultures. Further, this study seeks to fill gaps in previous LMX and employee voice studies by providing robust explanations of the cultural influences on LMX framework across nations.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2022

He-Boong Kwon, Jooh Lee and Laee Choi

This paper explores the nonlinear interactions of research and development (R&D) and advertising and their synergistic effect on firm performance using Tobin's Q. This…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the nonlinear interactions of research and development (R&D) and advertising and their synergistic effect on firm performance using Tobin's Q. This study also aims to investigate differential synergy patterns under varying levels of exports with a precision impact on performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Unlike a conventional statistical approach, this study uniquely presents a neural network approach to explore the dynamic interplay of strategic factors. A multilayer perceptron neural network (MPNN) is designed to capture complex interaction patterns through a predictive analytic process.

Findings

This study finds that the impact of R&D and advertising is positive, with a greater effect on high-export firms. Moreover, the experiment results show that the synergy of R&D and advertising goes beyond the formatted positive/negative frame and actually has a reinforcing effect.

Practical implications

This study not only conveys the significant nexus of R&D and advertising for firm performance but also provides industry managers' practical means to assess the joint effect of R&D and advertising on firm performance. The proposed analytic mechanism in particular provides pragmatic decision support to managers in harmonizing their R&D and advertising efforts for a foreseeable impact.

Originality/value

This paper presents an innovative analytic process using the MPNN to explore the synergy between R&D and advertising. In addition to offering new perspectives on R&D and advertising, this study presents pragmatic implications for managing those strategic resources to meet performance targets.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 November 2020

Laee Choi and Charles A. Lawry

Very few studies have considered how customer participation (CP) influences service employees' well-being. CP may lead employees to engage in emotional labor strategies…

Abstract

Purpose

Very few studies have considered how customer participation (CP) influences service employees' well-being. CP may lead employees to engage in emotional labor strategies (surface/deep acting), which can elevate their job stress. Whereas surface acting involves falsifying emotions, deep acting involves empathizing with others. Therefore, the current article examines how these emotional labor strategies arise from CP and create job stress.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 is an online survey of service employees' wellbeing during CP (n = 509). Study 2 compares service employees' responses within hedonic and utilitarian service settings through a scenario-based experiment (n = 440). PROCESS was used to analyze the data in both studies.

Findings

First, study 1 supports that perceived CP increases job stress. Secondly, surface acting mediates the link between CP and job stress, but deep acting does not. Thereafter, Study 2 shows that the link between CP and job stress decreases as employee-customer identification (ECI) increases only during surface acting. Additionally, the impact of surface acting on job stress during CP is greater for hedonic services than utilitarian services, but there is no significant difference for deep acting.

Originality/value

This article contributes an original perspective by comparing models of service employees' responses to CP and job stress in hedonic versus utilitarian settings. Moreover, the intervening effects of ECI and emotional labor strategies on job stress, as demonstrated through these employee-facing models, offer added value to the CRM and co-creation literature.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Laee Choi and Thomas Burnham

Prior research studying the mechanisms by which brand reputation influences consumer behaviors has largely relied on respondent measures of brand reputation, resulting in…

1265

Abstract

Purpose

Prior research studying the mechanisms by which brand reputation influences consumer behaviors has largely relied on respondent measures of brand reputation, resulting in an inability to ascertain the causal direction of relationships. Using third party measures, this paper aims to study the effects of brand reputation, via self-expressive brand perceptions, on both firm-directed and other customer-directed customer voluntary sharing behaviors (CVSB). It then assesses the moderating effect of consumer status-seeking on the relationships studied.

Design/methodology/approach

To prevent common method bias and substantiate causality claims, a third-party brand reputation measure is combined with a consumer survey. Process is used to test the hypotheses using 359 consumer responses collected via Amazon MTurk.

Findings

The results indicate that higher inner-self and social-self expressive perceptions derived from strong brand reputations increase consumer knowledge sharing and social influence behaviors. The effect of social-self expressive brand perceptions on CVSB is positively moderated by consumer status-seeking.

Practical implications

Firms should leverage existing brand reputation investments to strengthen customer perceptions of their brands as self-expressive and facilitate greater social and knowledge-sharing engagement by status-seeking consumers.

Originality/value

This study identifies a new mechanism linking brand reputation and CVSB: consumer perceptions of the self-expressiveness of brands. Moreover, it distinguishes the effects of two dimensions of brand self-expressiveness and substantiates the customer engagement behavior value of investing in brand reputation as measured by third parties.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Laee Choi and Jiyoung Hwang

This study aims to explore customer personality-related antecedents of customer citizenship behaviors (CCBs) that benefit service providers. It also investigates two-step…

1231

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore customer personality-related antecedents of customer citizenship behaviors (CCBs) that benefit service providers. It also investigates two-step consequences of CCBs: customer satisfaction and intention to continue the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

US consumers (n = 665) participated in online surveys regarding three types of service businesses with different levels of customization and customer contact. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results show a significant, positive impact of the two dimensions of prosocial personality (i.e. other-oriented empathy and helpfulness) and proactive personality on CCBs. Additionally, CCBs increase customer satisfaction and, in turn, intention to continue the relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests the importance of customer prosocial and proactive personality as antecedents of CCBs. Beyond intention to participate in CCBs, the present study shows that customers perceived satisfaction from CCBs, resulting in intention to continue the relationship with their service provider. Further research should investigate other types of customer personalities such as conscientiousness and agreeableness.

Practical implications

Service providers should understand customer personalities that lead to voluntary behaviors that benefit their organizations. This understanding allows the service providers to better communicate with their customers and to receive more assists from customers.

Originality/value

Previous research has shown that customers’ attitudinal perceptions impact CCBs. In contrast, this study highlights the strong and positive impact of customer personalities, prosocial and proactive personality, on CCBs. Another significant contribution of this study is that it incorporates the potential consequences of CCBs.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 February 2020

Thomas Burnham

Customer suggestions offer valuable insights to companies, and suggestion sharing is a form of engagement that strengthens customers’ relationships with firms. Yet…

Abstract

Purpose

Customer suggestions offer valuable insights to companies, and suggestion sharing is a form of engagement that strengthens customers’ relationships with firms. Yet research to date has neglected to explicitly study the antecedents of direct-to-firm consumer suggestion sharing or to adequately characterize the behavior. This paper aims to address this deficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws on two surveys using three different elicitation techniques – critical incident, direct reporting and scenario response. Inductive content analysis of consumer responses is used to derive exploratory insights regarding the range of factors that motivate and inhibit consumer suggestion sharing, with an emphasis on consumer service-related contexts.

Findings

Potential self, other and firm benefits motivate suggestion sharing, whereas a host of factors, including the effort involved, a lack of perceived firm efficacy and unpleasant sharing contexts inhibit it. The findings reveal a rich portrait of antecedents that illustrates how direct-to-firm suggestion-sharing behavior combines elements of customer citizenship behavior, customer complaint behavior and online community idea sharing.

Research limitations/implications

The research relies upon reporting by US students and consumers.

Practical implications

Service firms hoping to avail themselves of customers’ desire to contribute to their and their customers’ betterment must understand and manage the tripartite nature of consumer suggestion sharing evinced by the antecedents revealed.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this research offers the first description of the range of factors that motivate and inhibit direct-to-firm consumer suggestion sharing. As such, it provides a theoretical foundation upon which future consumer suggestion-sharing research can build.

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