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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Ladislava Khailova

This paper aims to provide an overview of reference sources in the discipline of disability studies to aid academic and larger public libraries in their collection…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of reference sources in the discipline of disability studies to aid academic and larger public libraries in their collection building efforts. Each discussed source is annotated, offering information on the title’s model for viewing disability, scope, structure and audience.

Design/methodology/approach

Reference titles in disability studies were located through searches in WorldCat, then evaluated, selected and carefully annotated. Resources included in this annotated bibliography are those that move beyond the medical model of disability, exploring disability rather as a social construct. Also, works with interdisciplinary focus were preferred during selection.

Findings

There is a variety of recently published reference resources in disability studies, including companions, encyclopedias, handbooks and series, that would potentially represent good additions to collections in academic and public libraries. Seven of these are annotated in this study.

Originality/value

Post-medical disability studies target a broad range of audiences: sociologists, arts and humanities scholars, activists, people with disabilities, individuals without disabilities and medical practitioners and caretakers. Given this broad audience appeal, it can be argued that any academic library or large public library will benefit from setting up or updating its collections on this relatively new discipline of study. The resources annotated in this study assist interested libraries in this endeavor.

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Brittany Paloma Fiedler, Rosan Mitola and James Cheng

The purpose of this paper is to describe how an academic library at one of the most diverse universities in the country responded to the 2016 election through the newly…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how an academic library at one of the most diverse universities in the country responded to the 2016 election through the newly formed Inclusion and Equity Committee and through student outreach.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper details the context of the 2016 election and the role of social justice in librarianship. It offers ideas for how library diversity committees can address professional development, recruitment and retention efforts and cultural humility. It highlights student outreach efforts to support marginalized students, educate communities and promote student activism. Finally, it offers considerations and suggestions for librarians who want to engage in this work.

Findings

This paper shows that incorporating social justice, diversity, equity and inclusion requires individuals taking action. If institutions want to focus on any of these issues, they need to formally include them in their mission, vision and values as well as in department goals and individual job descriptions. The University of Nevada, Las Vegas University Libraries fully supports this work, but most of the labor is done by a small number of people. Unsustainable practices can cause employee burnout and turnover resulting in less internal and external efforts to support diversity.

Originality/value

Most of the previous literature focuses either on internal activities, such as professional development and committees, or on student-focused activities, such as outreach events, displays and instruction. This paper is one comprehensive review of both kinds of activities.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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