Search results

1 – 10 of over 47000
Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 13 December 2013

Eugene Choo and Shannon Seitz

We develop and estimate an empirical collective model with endogenous marriage formation, participation, and family labor supply. Intra-household transfers arise…

Abstract

We develop and estimate an empirical collective model with endogenous marriage formation, participation, and family labor supply. Intra-household transfers arise endogenously as the transfers that clear the marriage market. The intra-household allocation can be recovered from observations on marriage decisions. Introducing the marriage market in the collective model allows us to independently estimate transfers from labor supplies and from marriage decisions. We estimate a semiparametric version of our model using 1980, 1990, and 2000 US Census data. Estimates of the model using marriage data are much more consistent with the theoretical predictions than estimates derived from labor supply.

Details

Structural Econometric Models
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-052-9

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Silke Uebelmesser

Abstract

Details

Unfunded Pension Systems: Ageing and Variance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44451-732-6

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

Maryke Dessing

The purpose of this paper is to critically review the literature to assess the relevance of the S‐shaped model of family labor supply for industrialized countries.

Downloads
1416

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically review the literature to assess the relevance of the S‐shaped model of family labor supply for industrialized countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Studies use a wide variety of methodologies and therefore are not readily comparable, but instead they cover a wide range of relevant factors such as historical trends, fringe benefits and home mortgages, ethnic differences, farm labor, low‐income households, child care, the impact of welfare benefits, and the problem of the measurement of work hours.

Findings

In spite of welfare systems that blur somewhat the predicted income effect at lower wage levels (forward falling segment primarily for women), this model appears to still bear some relevance for these countries, in particular in the face of declining real wages. Families have generally moved up higher along that curve, with less differentiated gender roles, women's stronger labor force attachment, and assortative mating of educated women.

Originality/value

The model is mostly relevant for LDCs and has far‐reaching practical consequences, while the review highlights the complexity of labor supply in industrialized countries.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2019

Nga Le, Wim Groot, Sonila M. Tomini and Florian Tomini

The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of empirical evidence on the labour market effects of health insurance from the supply side.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of empirical evidence on the labour market effects of health insurance from the supply side.

Design/methodology/approach

The study covers the largest peer-reviewed and working paper databases for labour economics and health studies. These include Web of Science, Google Scholar, Pubmed and the most popular economics working paper sources such as NBER, ECONSTOR, IDEAS, IZA, SSRN, World Bank Working Paper Series. The authors follow the PRISMA 2009 protocol for systematic reviews.

Findings

The collection includes 63 studies. The outcomes of interest are the number of hours worked, the probability of employment, self-employment and the level of economic formalisation. The authors find that the current literature is vastly concentrated on the USA. Spousal coverage in the USA is associated with reduced labour supply of secondary earners. The effect of Medicaid in the USA on the labour supply of its recipients is ambiguous. The employment-coverage link is an important determinant of the labour supply of people with health problems and self-employment decisions. Universal coverage may create either an incentive or a disincentive to work depending on the design of the system. Finally, evidence on the relationship between health insurance and the level of economic formalisation in developing countries is fragmented and limited.

Practical implications

This study reviews the existing literature on the labour market effects of health insurance from the supply side. The authors find a large knowledge gap in emerging economies where health coverage is expanding. The authors also highlight important literature gaps that need to be filled in different themes of the topic.

Originality/value

This is the first systematic review on the topic which is becoming increasingly relevant for policy makers in developing countries where health coverage is expanding.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Tekalign Gutu Sakketa and Nicolas Gerber

Within the framework of potential efforts and strategies to employment generation for young people in Africa in general and Ethiopia in particular, the agricultural sector…

Abstract

Within the framework of potential efforts and strategies to employment generation for young people in Africa in general and Ethiopia in particular, the agricultural sector is increasingly considered as an important sector and a valuable means for poverty reduction, the promotion of economic development, and youth's economic independence. Renewed hope is placed on the sector to offer sustainable livelihood prospects for the rural youth. Yet, the success and sustainability of the sector require a proper understanding of how households allocate youth labor time in the sector and whether agricultural labor supply is responsive to economic incentives such as shadow wages. Using gender- and age-specific plot-level panel data, we systematically analyze the impacts of shadow wages of each household member on youth agricultural labor supply across types of farms. The results indicate that agricultural shadow wages matter for the youth's labor supply in the sector, but the impact differs for male and female youth. We also show that trends and patterns of youth labor supply vary across gender and whether they work on their own farm, and so do their labor returns. The results are consistent after controlling for individual heterogeneity and instrumenting for possible endogeneity. Taking into account the intensity of youth's actual involvement in the family farm, own farm or off-farm work instead of their stated intentions, the results challenge the presumption that youth are abandoning agriculture, at least in agricultural potential areas of Ethiopia. Instead, the frequent narrative of youth disengaging from agriculture may be a result of methodological flaws or data limitations. The findings suggest that it is necessary to invest in agricultural development to enhance labor productivity and employability of young people in agriculture.

Details

Change at Home, in the Labor Market, and On the Job
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-933-5

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2015

Shoshana Grossbard and Victoria Vernon

Using micro data from CPS for the period 1995–2011 we investigate effects of Common Law Marriage (CLM) on labor outcomes and using the ATUS for the period 2003–2011 we…

Abstract

Using micro data from CPS for the period 1995–2011 we investigate effects of Common Law Marriage (CLM) on labor outcomes and using the ATUS for the period 2003–2011 we study its effects on household production and leisure. Identification of CLM effects arises through cross-state variation and variation over time, as three states abolished CLM over the period examined in the CPS data. Labor supply effects of CLM availability are negative for married women: for instance, weekly hours of work are reduced by 1–2 hours. In addition, some CLM effects on married men’s labor supply are positive. Consequently, the abolition of CLM in some states helps explain the convergence of men and women’s labor supply. Negative CLM effects on married women’s labor supply are limited to white, Hispanic, college-educated women, and women with children. There is little evidence of effects of CLM on leisure and household production. A conceptual framework based on the concept of Work-In-Household, marriage market analysis, and the assumption of traditional gender roles helps explain gender differentials in the effects of CLM on labor supply and why these effects are larger for white and college-educated women.

Details

Gender Convergence in the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-456-6

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 10 December 1998

D.A.G. Draper

Abstract

Details

Explaining Unemployment: Econometric Models for the Netherlands
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-847-6

Abstract

“Economics is a Serious Subject.” Edwin Cannan.

Details

Wisconsin, Labor, Income, and Institutions: Contributions from Commons and Bronfenbrenner
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-010-0

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Rolf Aaberge and Ugo Colombino

Abstract

Details

Handbook of Microsimulation Modelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-570-8

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1981

Z.A. Spindler

This paper analyses the general equilibrium and disequilibrium effects of fiscal policy when fiscal instruments have direct impacts on both aggregate supply and demand. A…

Abstract

This paper analyses the general equilibrium and disequilibrium effects of fiscal policy when fiscal instruments have direct impacts on both aggregate supply and demand. A model is specified which incorporates the direct impacts of expenditure and tax instruments on the behavioural function for individuals and firms and which explicitly recognises the role of public production and supply. In contrast to simple Keynesian and neoclassical models, this model involves direct supply‐side crowding out and budget composition effects that operate on both aggregate demand and supply. It also reveals the relative efficiency of various “balanced instruments” under Keynesian and neoclassical conditions.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

1 – 10 of over 47000