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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1984

William Sessions Ltd, of York (Tel: 0904 59224), suppliers of labelling systems, overprinters and self‐adhesive labels, has launched a new high‐speed fully‐automatic self…

Abstract

William Sessions Ltd, of York (Tel: 0904 59224), suppliers of labelling systems, overprinters and self‐adhesive labels, has launched a new high‐speed fully‐automatic self‐adhesive labelling machine incorporating the latest developments in microprocessor technology. It is claimed that the machine, the ‘Collamat 8500’, brings a totally new degree of high‐performance to self‐adhesive labelling on paint containers. This is due to the machine's ability to label consistently despite any fluctuation in the speed of product flow.

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Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 13 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Abstract

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Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 56 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

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Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 56 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Claudine Soosay, Breno Nunes, David John Bennett, Amrik Sohal, Juhaini Jabar and Mats Winroth

The purpose of this paper is to report an investigation of local sustainable production in Australia and Sweden aimed at exploring the factors contributing to survival and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report an investigation of local sustainable production in Australia and Sweden aimed at exploring the factors contributing to survival and competitiveness of manufacturing companies.

Design/methodology/approach

In Australia, six companies were studied in 2010, with comparisons being made with three of them from earlier projects. In Sweden, eight manufacturing companies were studied on two occasions 30 years apart, in 1980 and 2010. To provide a valid comparative perspective a common format for data collection and analysis was used.

Findings

There has been a shift in the nature of competition in both Sweden and Australia due to an increasing complexity of the global business environment as well as changes in technology and customer expectations. Despite the differences in country context, the findings suggest that all the manufacturing companies have a good awareness of the elements of the market environment and the relationships with their competitive strategy. However, in general, the Swedish companies have more experience of managing the risks and benefits from operating in the international environment.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the research are based on a relatively small sample of case companies in a limited number of industrial sectors. There are methodology implications for future research in the area.

Practical implications

The research results have practical implications for the manufacturing industry, especially for companies operating in a competitive international environment.

Originality/value

The paper is based on original case research and comparative analysis of data from different geographical contexts. It contributes to both theory and management practice about the strategic resources, decision choices, competitive environments and firm values needed to address external market demands as well as in building internal capabilities.

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Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Self‐adhesive labels are gaining a steadily growing share of the European labels market, which is estimated to have a volume of around DM 5.8 billion. Sales of self…

Abstract

Self‐adhesive labels are gaining a steadily growing share of the European labels market, which is estimated to have a volume of around DM 5.8 billion. Sales of self‐adhesive labels in 1992 came to some DM 3.0 billion, giving them a clear lead over gummed labels. Self‐adhesive labels are estimated to be growing at an annual rate of 8 to 10%.

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Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Based on many years experience of filling technology, OBS Machines Ltd offer a complete product range of large volume drum and container fillers. The De Vree drum filler…

Abstract

Based on many years experience of filling technology, OBS Machines Ltd offer a complete product range of large volume drum and container fillers. The De Vree drum filler range includes: semi‐automatic single drum/container filling units, semi‐automatic on‐pallet fillers, fully automated drum and container filling machines, conveying systems for drum and pallets, accumulation systems, depalletisers etc, together with total turn‐key plants for drum filling operations.

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Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1977

The connotations, associations, custom and usages of a name often give to it an importance that far outweighs its etymological significance. Even with personal surnames or…

Abstract

The connotations, associations, custom and usages of a name often give to it an importance that far outweighs its etymological significance. Even with personal surnames or the name of a business. A man may use his own name but not if by so doing it inflicts injury on the interests and business of another person of the same name. After a long period of indecision, it is now generally accepted that in “passing off”, there is no difference between the use of a man's own name and any other descriptive word. The Courts will only intervene, however, when a personal name has become so much identified with a well‐known business as to be necessarily deceptive when used without qualification by anyone else in the same trade; i.e., only in rare cases. In the early years, the genesis of goods and trade protection, fraud was a necessary ingredient of “passing off”, an intent to deceive, but with the merging off Equity with the Common Law, the equitable rule that interference with “property” did not require fraudulent intent was practised in the Courts. First applying to trade marks, it was extended to trade names, business signs and symbols and business generally. Now it is unnecessary to prove any intent to deceive, merely that deception was probable, or that the plaintiff had suffered actual damage. The equitable principle was not established without a struggle, however, and the case of “Singer” Sewing Machines (1877) unified the two streams of law but not before it reached the House of Lords. On the way up, judical opinions differed; in the Court of Appeal, fraud was considered necessary—the defendant had removed any conception of fraud by expressingly declaring in advertisements that his “Singer” machines were manufactured by himself—so the Court found for him, but the House of Lords considered the name “Singer” was in itself a trade mark and there was no more need to prove fraud in the case of a trade name than a trade mark; Hence, the birth of the doctrine that fraud need not be proved, but their Lordships showed some hesitation in accepting property rights for trade names. If the name used is merely descriptive of goods, there can be no cause for action, but if it connotes goods manufactured by one firm or prepared from a formula or compsitional requirements prescribed by and invented by a firm or is the produce of a region, then others have no right to use it. It is a question of fact whether the name is the one or other. The burden of proof that a name or term in common use has become associated with an individual product is a heavy one; much heavier in proving an infringement of a trade mark.

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British Food Journal, vol. 79 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1972

The New Year will see Britain a member of the largest multi‐national free trade area in the world and there must be few who see it as anything less than the beginning of a…

Abstract

The New Year will see Britain a member of the largest multi‐national free trade area in the world and there must be few who see it as anything less than the beginning of a new era, in trade, its trends, customs and usages and especially in the field of labour, relations, mobility, practices. Much can be foreseen but to some extent it is all very unpredictable. Optimists see it as a vast market of 250 millions, with a lot of money in their pockets, waiting for British exports; others, not quite so sure, fear the movement of trade may well be in reverse and if the increasing number of great articulated motor trucks, heavily laden with food and other goods, now spilling from the Channel ports into the roads of Kent are an indication, the last could well be true. They come from faraway places, not all in the European Economic Community; from Yugoslavia and Budapest, cities of the Rhineland, from Amsterdam, Stuttgart, Mulhouse and Milano. Kent has had its invasions before, with the Legions of Claudius and in 1940 when the battle roared through the Kentish skies. Hitherto quiet villagers are now in revolt against the pre‐juggernaut invasion; they, too, fear more will come with the enlarged EEC, thundering through their one‐street communities.

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British Food Journal, vol. 74 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1966

AT an international exhibition in Moscow during September a pavilion covering 6,500 sq. ft. displayed equipment designed to improve the organization of work. The unusual…

Abstract

AT an international exhibition in Moscow during September a pavilion covering 6,500 sq. ft. displayed equipment designed to improve the organization of work. The unusual thing is that the equipment was office machinery and systems exhibited by the Business Equipment Trade Association of this country and five of its member firms. Until now the U.S.S.R. has been a negligible market for such goods, but the Soviet Union has now declared its intention to increase the automation of clerical work through installing modern equipment of the sort favoured by western countries. The report of a delegation of the Association's members put this point so strongly that, as a ‘joint under‐taking’ with the British Board of Trade, it was thought justifiable to attack this burgeoning market.

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Work Study, vol. 15 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

J. Liu

The purpose of the work is to investigate the feasibility of using anisotropically conductive adhesives to join surface‐mount devices as solder replacement. The results…

Abstract

The purpose of the work is to investigate the feasibility of using anisotropically conductive adhesives to join surface‐mount devices as solder replacement. The results from a literature and market survey are reported. Based on industrial demands, two anisotropically conductive adhesives were chosen for the experimental work. During the experimental work, the conductive adhesive joints were produced at various curing conditions. The joints were characterised by shear testing and electrical resistance measurement after ageing at 20, 70 and 120°C to 1000 hours. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterise the adhesive joints. In addition to this, temperature cycling tests, humidity test and pull tensile tests were used to qualify the adhesive joint reliability and quality. From the results of the present work, it can be concluded that the anisotropically conductive adhesive A joints are stable in the 85°C/85% RH environment and therefore have better corrosion resistance than adhesive B joints. Neither of the adhesives can pass temperature cycling from −55 to 125°C for 1000 cycles according to military standard 883C.

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Circuit World, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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