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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2022

Hsuan-Hsuan Ku and Pei-Ting Chen

To heighten shopper interest, fast moving consumer goods marketers often attach supplementary labels to the package front to promote product benefits. This study aims to…

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Abstract

Purpose

To heighten shopper interest, fast moving consumer goods marketers often attach supplementary labels to the package front to promote product benefits. This study aims to use claim credibility as the foundation for investigating how an extra affixed label that addresses product benefits impacts consumer evaluation, as well as identifying important factors that might moderate the resulting responses.

Design/methodology/approach

Three between-subjects experiments examine how claim credibility mediates the influence of extra affixed labels on product evaluation (Study 1). They also test whether the impact on consumer responses of extra affixed labels, with emphasis on the same vs different benefits as those printed on the front of a package (Study 2.1) or with a high or low relevance between their claimed benefits and the front-of-package stated ingredients (Study 2.2), is dependent upon individuals’ need for cognition.

Findings

Results show the power of extra affixed labels in improving product evaluation. Claim credibility mediated the observed effects of extra affixed labeling. Yet, the favorable effects of extra affixed labels for individuals high in need for cognition is diminished when expressed in a different (vs same) claim from those printed on the package front or the claim about product benefits is low (vs high) relevance to the declared ingredients. The reverse holds true for those low in need for cognition.

Originality/value

This study advances knowledge on the effects of extra affixed label claims on product evaluation.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 November 2022

Rojan Baniya, Yuting An and Brijesh Thapa

Sustainable consumption is a crucial route to sustainable tourism. Hence, the purpose of this study is to investigate the individual and combined effect of social learning…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainable consumption is a crucial route to sustainable tourism. Hence, the purpose of this study is to investigate the individual and combined effect of social learning and eco-labels on the green hotel selection.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a between-subject online experimental method with 199 respondents, which is used only in around 15% of published tourism articles. Additionally, this method provided reliability and control features.

Findings

Social learning and eco-labels individually could not influence tourists to select green hotels. However, the interaction of positive performance social learning with eco-labels could potentially influence tourists' green hotel selection. Therefore, internalizing green hotel performance from trusted sources and external validation bring behavioral changes among tourists to select green hotels. This study offers a new social learning-based model for understanding sustainable consumption.

Research limitations/implications

This study can use various other types of social influences and can be expanded to other green settings.

Practical implications

This study provides policy and promotion formulation insights to hotel managers and sustainable tourism promoters to market green hotels.

Originality/value

Away from the traditional theory, this study bridges the gap between social learning of performance from relatable sources, assurance from governing entities and sustainable consumption. The interaction effect of social influence and eco-label on green hotel selection is a novel finding. Also, this study introduces various levels of social learning to the discussion of sustainable consumption.

绿色酒店选择:社会学习和生态标签的影响

摘要

设计/方法/途径(限 100 字)

该研究对 199 名受访者使用了主题间在线实验方法, 仅在大约 15% 的已发表旅游文章中使用。此外, 这种方法提供了可靠性和控制功能。

目的(限100字)

可持续消费是可持续旅游的重要途径。因此, 本研究调查了社会学习和生态标签对绿色酒店选择的个体和综合影响。

调查结果(限 100 字)

单独的社会学习和生态标签不能影响游客选择绿色酒店。然而, 积极绩效社会学习与生态标签的相互作用可能会影响游客对绿色酒店的选择。因此, 从可信赖的来源和外部验证中内化绿色酒店绩效, 会带来游客选择绿色酒店的行为变化。该研究为理解可持续消费提供了一种新的基于社会学习的模型。

研究限制/影响(限制 100 字)

该研究可以使用各种其他类型的社会影响, 并可以扩展到其他绿色环境。

实际意义(限 100 字)

它为酒店经理和可持续旅游推广者提供了政策和促销制定的见解, 以推销绿色酒店。

原创性/价值(限100字)

与传统理论不同, 本文填补了相关来源的绩效社会学习、管理实体的保证和可持续消费之间的研究空白。社会影响和生态标签对绿色酒店选择的交互作用是一个新的发现。此外, 它还将不同层次的社会学习引入到可持续消费的讨论中。

Selección de hoteles ecológicos: Los efectos del aprendizaje social y las ecoetiquetas

Resumen

Diseño/metodología/enfoque (límite 100 palabras)

El estudio utilizó un método experimental online entre sujetos con 199 encuestados, utilizado sólo en alrededor del 15% de los artículos de turismo publicados. Además, este método ofrecía características de fiabilidad y control.

Objetivo (límite 100 palabras)

El consumo sostenible es una vía crucial para el turismo sostenible. Por ello, este estudio investiga el efecto individual y combinado del aprendizaje social y las etiquetas ecológicas en la selección de hoteles ecológicos.

Conclusiones (límite 100 palabras)

El aprendizaje social y las ecoetiquetas por separado no pudieron influir en los turistas para que seleccionaran hoteles ecológicos. Sin embargo, la interacción del aprendizaje social del rendimiento positivo con las ecoetiquetas podría influir potencialmente en la selección de hoteles ecológicos por parte de los turistas. Por lo tanto, la interiorización del rendimiento de los hoteles ecológicos a partir de fuentes de confianza y la validación externa provocan cambios de comportamiento entre los turistas para seleccionar hoteles ecológicos. El estudio ofrece un nuevo modelo basado en el aprendizaje social para entender el consumo sostenible.

Limitaciones/implicaciones de la investigación (límite 100 palabras)

El estudio puede utilizar otros tipos de influencias sociales y puede ampliarse a otros entornos ecológicos.

Implicaciones prácticas (límite 100 palabras)

Proporciona ideas para la formulación de políticas y promociones a los directores de hoteles y a los promotores del turismo sostenible para comercializar hoteles ecológicos.

Originalidad/valor (límite 100 palabras)

Se aleja de la teoría tradicional y tiende un puente entre el aprendizaje social de los resultados a partir de fuentes relacionadas, la garantía de las entidades gobernantes y el consumo sostenible. El efecto de la interacción entre la influencia social y la etiqueta ecológica en la selección de hoteles ecológicos es un hallazgo novedoso. Además, introduce varios niveles de aprendizaje social en el debate sobre el consumo sostenible.

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2022

Haiyan Wang, Huijuan Li, Yinfei Zhao and Nannan Xi

Individuals, organizations, firms, and governments have been making strenuous effort to promote sustainable and green consumption. However, it is noticeable that a large…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals, organizations, firms, and governments have been making strenuous effort to promote sustainable and green consumption. However, it is noticeable that a large amount of unattractive produce is ruthlessly discarded and wasted around the globe, resulting in unsustainable consumption behavior, harming long-term business development, and breaking the harmonious relationship between humans and nature. Therefore, to increase consumer literacy toward unaesthetic produce, this research investigates the pivotal role of “natural” labeling in increasing purchase intention toward visually unattractive fruits and vegetables.

Design/methodology/approach

By recruiting participants from one of the largest online crowdsourcing platforms (the Credamo), this research conducts three online experimental studies (with two pilot studies) to test three hypotheses based on the cue utilization theory and the lay belief theory.

Findings

The results show that unattractive produce with the “natural” label could significantly increase consumers' purchase intention compared with those without specific labels. The results also reveal that consumers' lay beliefs that natural foods are perceived to be tastier and healthier mediate the positive effects of “natural” labeling (vs no specific labeling) on willingness to purchase.

Originality/value

This research explores competing lay beliefs about unattractive produce. It identifies the positive effects of lay beliefs “natural = tasty and healthy” through “natural” labeling appeal, thus attenuating the misapplication of lay beliefs “unattractive = tasteless and unhealthy” and broadening the application scope of consumer lay belief theory. The findings also contribute to the cue literature by manifesting the positive consequences of the “natural” label playing as a cognitive cue in priming lay beliefs about naturalness. In addition, it also paves a positive way for business practitioners and marketers to develop the produce industry sustainably.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Petra Tenbült, Nanne De Vries, Ellen Dreezens and Carolien Martijn

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into whether GM‐labelling leads to different processing behaviour of food stimuli compared to when products are not labelled.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into whether GM‐labelling leads to different processing behaviour of food stimuli compared to when products are not labelled.

Design/methodology/approach

A task was designed to investigate people's categorization behaviour as a function of information provided. In two studies each participant was randomly allocated to either the experimental “GM‐labelled condition”, or the control “non‐labelled condition”.

Findings

Different processing strategies and different characteristics are used to judge products that are labelled as genetically modified or not. GM labelling of foods is interpreted to induce analytical processing of information and therefore the products are classified relatively more often on the basis of verifiable categorization criteria compared to when they were not labelled as GM. When products are not labelled as GM, information is more likely to be automatically processed and non‐verifiable categorization criteria are used.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the processes that labelling as GM brings about.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Diane Halstead and Cheryl B. Ward

Private label brands may be in danger as a result of recent changesin the marketing strategies used by private label firms. The primarycompetitive advantage of private…

5569

Abstract

Private label brands may be in danger as a result of recent changes in the marketing strategies used by private label firms. The primary competitive advantage of private label brands, good quality at low prices, may be lost if private label firms continue to modify and expand how their brands are marketed. Specifically, changes in private label brands′ advertising, packaging, sales promotion, and product improvement strategies indicate that private label brands are moving closer than ever to manufacturer brand status. To the extent that these changes result in higher average retail prices and/or lower gross margins for retailers, the advantages of private brands to both consumers and distributors will diminish, illustrating that the historical “wheel of retailing” hypothesis may be applicable to private label brands. Investigates the aforementioned trends and provides suggestions for manufacturers and retailers for future brand management strategies.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Jasmina Ranilović and Irena Colić Barić

The purpose of this paper is to identify the socio‐demographic and health variables of a representative sample of Croatian subjects over 15 years of age associated with…

2101

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the socio‐demographic and health variables of a representative sample of Croatian subjects over 15 years of age associated with reading nutrition labels and, in particular, to examine the association of age characteristics of “label users” with nutrition reading habits.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 1,011 randomly selected subjects over 15 years of age were interviewed by telephone. Moreover, 638 “label users” were recruited for assessing nutrition label habits.

Findings

Of the subjects, 36 per cent claimed that they had never, 25 per cent rarely, 19 per cent always and 15 per cent sometimes read nutrition labels. Females, participants with the highest levels of education, still undergoing education, physically active and on special diets claimed that they were more likely to read nutrition labels. Among “label users”, younger participants mentioned “curiosity” as the most important reason for reading nutrition labels, while older participants more often pointed out “wish for healthy eating habits”. “Interpretational aids” were often mentioned among younger participants for easier understanding of nutritional information, while older participants requested “bigger letter size”.

Research limitations/implications

The present study provides a starting point for establishing nutrition education targeted at specific groups of consumers. Research is limited to the subject's self‐reported nutrition label reading. Future research is needed to explore the differences between “label users” and “’non‐users”.

Originality/value

As the study showed, a notable difference exists between younger and older subjects regarding nutrition habits that could help experts toward effective communication. Nevertheless, the study could fill the research gaps in nutrition reading habits of specific groups of consumers in European countries, other than northern Europe.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2007

Susan M. Harris

The purpose of this paper is to describe a sustainability certification system and label based on an independent, full life cycle assessment of conventionally produced…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a sustainability certification system and label based on an independent, full life cycle assessment of conventionally produced goods from “cradle to grave”.

Design/methodology/approach

The design approach used comprised five phases: review of presently available third party environmental certification systems regarding their suitability for use as a sustainability certification tool for conventionally produced goods; identification of desirable scientific and consumer design criteria for a sustainability certification system and label; identification of key performance indicators for sustainability; description of an independent sustainability certification system based on the desirable design criteria, in particular an independent full life cycle assessment; and market trials of the sustainability label to test consumer reactions and commercial benefits of independent sustainability certification using two commercial case studies in Australia and New Zealand.

Findings

None of the third party environmental certification systems reviewed was suitable for use as a sustainability certification tool. Desirable design criteria for a sustainability certification system centred on an independent, full life cycle assessment of operations from “cradle to grave”. A total of eight safety and 12 sustainability key performance indicators were proposed to specifically assess sustainability performance. An instantly recognizable logo comprising a “Green Tick” inside a circle, reminiscent of a government “stamp of approval”, was used as a sustainability label. Market trials of certified household products and lamb meat in Australasia confirmed positive consumer reactions to the “Green Tick” label, and considerable commercial benefits for the companies that used it on their products.

Practical implications

The “Green Tick” sustainability certification system and label addresses an identified gap in the market by providing an easily recognizable, independent, life cycle based sustainability certification of consumer products. Market trials indicated that there was measurable consumer support for independent sustainability labelling, and significant commercial benefits for companies whose products qualified for sustainability labelling.

Originality/value

The paper describes the world's first‐ever independent sustainability certification system and label. It is based on third party, full life cycle assessment of products, in accordance with the European Commission's view that sustainability labelling should be based on independent, full life cycle assessments of products. Market trials of the label in the Australasian FMCG sector indicated that consumers responded positively to an easily recognizable, independent sustainability label, and that independent sustainability certification and labelling have significant commercial potential for manufacturers of genuinely sustainable products.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Michele Sadler

European regulations for labelling the genetically modified commodity crops Round‐up Ready Soya and Bt Maize have been agreed and came into force on 1 September 1998. The…

548

Abstract

European regulations for labelling the genetically modified commodity crops Round‐up Ready Soya and Bt Maize have been agreed and came into force on 1 September 1998. The regulation requires labelling of ingredients that contain genetically modified DNA or modified protein. Labelling is not required where processing has resulted in modified DNA or protein being destroyed. With the aim of providing consumer information and ensuring consumer choice, UK industry had phased in labelling of genetically modified soya and maize protein since January 1998, ahead of the EU regulation being agreed. This voluntary labelling was on the basis of guidelines drawn up by an IGD Working Group. The voluntary guidelines are very similar to the EU labelling regulation. Under the terms of the labelling regulation, further discussions are necessary in Europe to agree a list of ingredients that will not require labelling on the basis that no modified DNA or protein is present, with the aim that these ingredients do not need to be tested each time they are used. Where efforts have been taken to source the non‐genetically modified varieties, the concept of a threshold has been put forward to allow for adventitious mixing with the genetically modified crop. Further discussions are necessary to agree where the threshold should be set. It is expected that the regulation will be the basis for labelling future genetically modified products.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Ogenyi Ejye Omar

Kwik‐Save′s decision to make its first ever own‐label food products (NoFrills) is a clear evidence that own‐label products are more popularthan at any time. Investigates…

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Abstract

Kwik‐Save′s decision to make its first ever own‐label food products (No Frills) is a clear evidence that own‐label products are more popular than at any time. Investigates consumer perceptions of national and own‐label grocery products. Reveals that consumers perceive many differences among the two brand types tested. To find the factors accounting for the perceived quality of food, typical consumer explanation for both quality and value for money is about the price and physical attributes of the food brands. Other factors such as store image and food ingredients are equally important. The appeal for own‐label groceries is based on price and consumer scepticism. Product quality is usually the major purchasing factor and the measure of value. The assessment of consumer thinking comes from the marketplace. Cola, lemonade, and orange juice were three product lines put to taste‐on‐test in an effort to assess consumer preferences. Concludes that differences exist in the shoppers′ price and quality perceptions, and brand preference across the product lines tested. Own‐label preference is based on price and value for money rather than quality.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Ashley Mannell, Patricia Brevard, Rodolfo Nayga, Pierre Combris, Robert Lee and Janet Gloeckner

To survey consumers living in Paris, France, to determine the extent to which they use nutrition labels, and to determine the percentage of French consumers who use…

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Abstract

Purpose

To survey consumers living in Paris, France, to determine the extent to which they use nutrition labels, and to determine the percentage of French consumers who use nutrition labels, how often they use nutrition labels, and how they would like to see current nutrition labels improved. The researchers also wanted to determine the reasons why consumers do not use nutrition labels, and to try and assess users' and non‐users' perceptions about mandatory nutrition labelling.

Design/methodology/approach

French consumers (n  =  355) were surveyed in supermarkets in Paris and its suburbs, using a 21‐item questionnaire in May 2004. Interviewers used questionnaires to assess the frequency of respondents' nutrition label use, to investigate the specific nutrient information most commonly consulted on nutrition labels, the types of products on which consumers most often tend to consult nutrition labels, and to collect demographic information.

Findings

Only 45.1 per cent of the sample reported reading nutrition labels, with the majority of consumers reading labels only occasionally. Non‐label readers cited lack of interest as the primary reason why they do not read labels, but 95 per cent of the sample, when asked about mandatory nutrition labeling, felt that nutrition labeling should be required of food manufacturers. Research limitations/implications The sample size was small, participation was voluntary and was limited to the city of Paris and its suburbs, and therefore cannot be generalized to the French population.

Originality/value

This is the first study to collect data in a point‐of‐purchase setting in order to examine whether or not French consumers use nutrition labels.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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