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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2015

LaToya O’Neal Coleman, Timothy M. Hale, Shelia R. Cotten and Philip Gibson

Information and communication technology (ICT) usage is pervasive among present day youth, with about 95% of youth ages 12–17 years reporting use of the Internet. Due to…

Abstract

Purpose

Information and communication technology (ICT) usage is pervasive among present day youth, with about 95% of youth ages 12–17 years reporting use of the Internet. Due to the proliferation of ICT use among this generation, it is important to understand the impacts of ICT usage on well-being. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of ICT usage on psychological well-being among a sample of urban, predominately African American youth.

Methodology/approach

Paper and pencil surveys were administered to fourth and fifth grade students enrolled in 27 elementary schools in the southeastern United States. Relationships between hours using various types of ICTs and the frequency of Internet activities on depression, hopelessness, self-esteem, and belonging were examined using Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression.

Findings

Results indicate that ICT usage has both positive and negative implications for psychological well-being, depending upon the type of ICT use and outcome being examined.

Social Implications

The proliferation of ICT usage among present day youth may actually lessen its impact on psychological well-being. Since the amount of ICT usage does not seem to influence psychological well-being, future research should examine the impact of ICT content on psychological well-being.

Details

Technology and Youth: Growing Up in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-265-8

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2015

Abstract

Details

Technology and Youth: Growing Up in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-265-8

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2015

Abstract

Details

Technology and Youth: Growing Up in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-265-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2015

Abstract

Details

Technology and Youth: Growing Up in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-265-8

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Article
Publication date: 22 September 2021

Evthokia Stephanie Saclarides

Modeling is a potentially productive activity in which coaches can engage teachers to support teaching and learning (Gibbons and Cobb, 2017). Yet, there is a lack of…

Abstract

Purpose

Modeling is a potentially productive activity in which coaches can engage teachers to support teaching and learning (Gibbons and Cobb, 2017). Yet, there is a lack of empirical research that describes how coaches can productively implement this activity with teachers. The overarching purpose of this study was to explore the challenges and support coaches faced while modeling instruction for teachers.

Design/methodology/approach

Twenty-nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with five coaches and six elementary teachers in two different school districts in the United States. The data were qualitatively coded using a combination of literature-driven and emergent codes.

Findings

Participants identified 16 distinct challenges they faced during coaching cycles involving modeling, and 11 supports that could ultimately enhance the success of the modeled lesson for all involved parties. These challenges and support spanned the broad categories of contextual factors, management and logistics, pedagogical dilemmas and teacher learning.

Originality/value

Although modeling is a popular coaching activity, researchers have only an emerging understanding of the challenges associated with modeling instruction, as well as the support that can enhance the modeled lesson's success. By having a thorough understanding of such challenges and support, coaches can effectively leverage modeling to support teaching and learning at their schools. Hence, the findings from this study will importantly inform coaching practice, as well as future research directions.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2021

Kathryn Krase, Leina Luzuriaga, Donna Wang, Andrew Schoolnik, Chantee Parris-Strigle, Latoya Attis and Petra Brown

Repercussions to everyday life caused by the COVID-19 pandemic disproportionately impacted certain segments of the population, including older adults, communities of color…

Abstract

Purpose

Repercussions to everyday life caused by the COVID-19 pandemic disproportionately impacted certain segments of the population, including older adults, communities of color and women. The societal response to reduce the impact of the pandemic, including closing schools and working from home, has been experienced differentially by women. This study explored how individual challenges and coping mechanisms differed for women as compared to men.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used an anonymous, cross-sectional, online survey early in the COVID-19 pandemic. Convenience, snowball and purposive sampling methods were used. Data were collected in June 2020 targeting adults living in Canada and the USA, with a total of 1,405 people responding, of which, the respondents were primarily women, White and with high education levels.

Findings

The results of this study confirm previous research that women struggled more to adapt to the pandemic and felt less prepared than men during the COVID-19 pandemic. Further, this study found significant differences in the sources of information and support used by women as compared to men.

Originality/value

The findings of this study not only confirm past research but also highlight that practice and policy responses to this pandemic, and future research on national level crises need to be targeted by gender, so that different needs are effectively addressed. Additionally, this article also identifies sources or challenges, as well as support, in order to inform and strengthen such responses.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2008

John L. Cotton, Bonnie S. O'Neill and Andrea Griffin

The paper seeks to examine how the uniqueness and ethnicity of first names influence affective reactions to those names and their potential for hire.

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to examine how the uniqueness and ethnicity of first names influence affective reactions to those names and their potential for hire.

Design/methodology/approach

In study 1, respondents evaluated 48 names in terms of uniqueness and likeability, allowing us to select names viewed consistently as Common, Russian, African‐American, and Unusual. In Study 2 respondents assessed the uniqueness and likeability of the names, and whether they would hire someone with the name.

Findings

Results indicated that Common names were seen as least unique, best liked, and most likely to be hired. Unusual names were seen as most unique, least liked, and least likely to be hired. Russian and African‐American names were intermediate in terms of uniqueness, likeability and being hired, significantly different from Common and Unique names, but not significantly different from each other.

Research limitations/implications

The name an individual carries has a significant impact on how he or she is viewed, and conceivably, whether or not the individual is hired for a job.

Practical implications

Human resource professionals need to be aware that there seems to be a clear bias in how people perceive names. When resumés are screened for hiring, names should be left off. Our findings also suggest that when selecting, parents may want to reconsider choosing something distinctive.

Originality/value

This study offers original findings in regards to names, combining diverse research from social psychology and labor economics, and offering practical implications.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Trecia Latoya Pryce, Jollette Russell, Marsha Nicola Crawford, Joan Opal McDermott and Ariel Christina, Nordia Perkins

The purpose of this study is to detail the experiences, perspectives and emerging framework for the delivery of library services by member libraries of the College…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to detail the experiences, perspectives and emerging framework for the delivery of library services by member libraries of the College Libraries Information Network (COLINET) at the onset and during the COVID-19 pandemic in Jamaica.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory sequential mixed approach was used for this study. Qualitative data was collected initially using a semi-structured interview with a virtual focus group comprising seven librarians from the COLINET in Jamaica. Purposive sampling was used to select the participants for the focus group. The second phase of data collection used an online survey through Google Forms to the membership of COLINET; 19 of 31 libraries (61.2%) responded to the survey.

Findings

The findings reveal the current status of library operation and service delivery at the COLINET member libraries. The impact of COVID-19 on staffing arrangements, support and engagement, library resources and services are seen through the lens of the challenges and opportunities presented by the pandemic.

Research limitations/implications

In total, 19 of the 31 libraries in COLINET responded to the survey; therefore, the researchers were unable to get a comprehensive assessment of the impact of COVID-19 on COLINET libraries.

Practical implications

This study will assist libraries in their response to COVID-19 and other similar future national public health crises. The findings and recommendations can provide a blueprint for developing policies and procedures for libraries during a national health crisis. Additionally, it will add to the empirical literature on Caribbean libraries.

Originality/value

This study is essential for libraries responding to the coronavirus pandemic in Jamaica and the wider Caribbean region. This study examines the response of academic libraries from diverse tertiary institutions; exploring their challenges, solutions and emerging frameworks; making it representative and inclusive for academic libraries. This study advances the limited research that exists with regard to Caribbean libraries and the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Tyrone Morris Parchment, Jayson Jones, Zoila Del-Villar, Latoya Small and Mary McKay

High school completion is one of the strongest predictors of health and well-being. There is increased public attention on the challenges faced by young people of color…

Abstract

Purpose

High school completion is one of the strongest predictors of health and well-being. There is increased public attention on the challenges faced by young people of color and educational achievement. In particular, young men of color must navigate myriad stressors which often undermine their mental health, as well as their academic performance, including likelihood of graduation from high school that fare worse in academic outcomes than their female counterparts. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of Step-Up, a positive youth development and mental health promotion program, created in collaboration with young people of color on their high school achievement as measured by grade point average (GPA).

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory pre-post study employed multivariate analysis of data drawn from a sample of 212 youth of color to examine student’s GPA before their involvement in Step-Up and the number of Step-Up groups they attend in the first year could improve their high school achievement.

Findings

Results revealed an association between students participation in Step-Up, specifically having at least ten life skills group contacts, and significant increases in GPA.

Research limitations/implications

High school achievement is measured by GPA, which might not be a clear indication of achievement since grades are not truly comparable across schools. The exploratory pre-post research design of this study, and the lack of control group, limits any references to causality but the descriptive changes in GPA demonstrate a statistical significance of Step-Up group participation and improved high school achievement. A potential next step is to design an experimental study that includes psychosocial and developmental mechanisms while examining the treatment effect of Step-Up vs students receiving standard of care.

Practical implications

Programs that aid young people of color in increasing their GPA should acknowledge the multitude of stressors that youth in urban environments encounter by creating interventions targeting multiple ecological contexts. These preliminary analyses suggest how programmatic supports that are collaboratively designed with youth, such as Step-Up, may yield promising results in improving young people of color high school achievement.

Social implications

To better serve adolescents experiencing serious academic and behavioral health challenges, there needs to be programs that offer intensive, short-term mental health support in school settings. Given the widespread risk factors that adolescents and particularly young men of color are facing, Step-Up is informed by both the developmental assets framework and the social development model and aims to provide youth with opportunities for prosocial interactions and additional resources to combat multiple stressors. Since successful completion of high school is associated with better outcomes as young people transition to adulthood, programs that are developmentally timed to allow for an optimal protective factor during the high school years is necessary.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the knowledge base of the importance of providing mental health supports in school settings and may contribute to studies examining the academic achievement of young people of color in school settings.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Brandon Randolph-Seng, Claudia C. Cogliser, Angela F. Randolph, Terri A Scandura, Carliss D. Miller and Rachelle Smith-Genthôs

The workforce is becoming increasingly diverse and yet leadership research has lagged behind this trend. In particular, theory links leader-member exchange (LMX) to the…

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3310

Abstract

Purpose

The workforce is becoming increasingly diverse and yet leadership research has lagged behind this trend. In particular, theory links leader-member exchange (LMX) to the development of racially diverse leaders (e.g. Scandura and Lankau, 1996). Yet, there remains a need for empirical evaluation of this premise. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, results of two studies of the effects of leader-member diversity on the LMX dimensions of professional respect, affect, loyalty, and contributions were examined. In the first study, supervisor-subordinate dyads in an applied work setting were examined, while in the second study a laboratory study was used.

Findings

Results in Study 1 indicated that cross-race and minority dyads reported different LMX attributes of professional respect, affect, loyalty and contributions compared with dyads where both members were of the racial majority. In Study 2, racial compositions of dyads was not associated with reported differences in LMX relationships, but was associated with differences in task performance.

Originality/value

This research provides the first systematic examination of the influence of racial diversity on LMX in a leader-follower dyad. As such, this work provides an important reference point in which future research on LMX and diversity can build. Such efforts will help future organizational leaders better navigate the increasingly diverse workplace.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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