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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Shiful Islam, Susumu Kunifuji, Tessai Hayama and Motoki Miura

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the significant factors which encourage and motivate the library and information science (LIS) academics to respond to and embrace…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the significant factors which encourage and motivate the library and information science (LIS) academics to respond to and embrace e‐learning (EL), to explore how EL tools and technologies support the LIS education process, and to measure weights of factors constraining the use of EL in LIS education. It also reports perceptions of how LIS academics manage EL‐knowledge resources, the problems they face in managing those resources, the ways to solve those problems, and their predictions about future usage of EL in LIS education.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology includes a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods. The authors used an exploratory online e‐mail interview method to gather experiences and data from LIS academics worldwide. The authors also used (www.docs.google.com) to prepare a questionnaire, and sent a link to the questionnaire to 85 LIS academics globally to gather their perceptions regarding EL in LIS schools.

Findings

The findings confirmed that EL overcomes location and time constraints, provides opportunities for employed and/or busy people, etc. is a driving force in education, which encourages and motivates LIS academics to respond to and embrace EL in LIS education, and EL accelerates accessibility of a wide range of knowledge, supports the process of exchanging knowledge, and increases knowledge storage capacity to enhance the LIS education process. This paper concludes that the respondents hold highly positive perceptions regarding the future of EL in LIS schools.

Originality/value

The paper explores the original perceptions of LIS academics, and their predictions regarding future usage of EL in LIS schools.

Details

Library Review, vol. 60 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Roknuzzaman and Katsuhiro Umemoto

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how and why library and information science (LIS) academics have responded to the advent of knowledge management (KM).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how and why library and information science (LIS) academics have responded to the advent of knowledge management (KM).

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs an “experience survey” as a research strategy. Besides a review of scientific literature, this study conducts an e‐mail survey of 106 LIS academics of the world who have adopted KM education in their schools. A structured questionnaire comprising of both closed and open questions is used as the data collection instrument. The study analyses 57 filled‐in valid questionnaires following a mixed‐method approach of research.

Findings

The ways of knowing and degrees of understanding of KM concepts among the LIS academics are varied. Although KM is distinct from LIS, there exists a strong link between the two knowledge domains. LIS academics have positively responded to KM and considering its long root in LIS, they have argued for a serious consideration of the adoption of KM in LIS. The significant reasons for why the academics have responded to KM are the role of global knowledge economy, the natural evolution of the information field, interdisciplinarity, domain expansion, survival issues, and trends in technological innovations, etc.

Research limitations/implications

Many LIS schools do not come under investigation due to lack of their web accessibility.

Practical implications

It is suggested that LIS academics apply a holistic approach of KM and expand the knowledge domain of LIS by providing a sound understanding of the underlying concepts, theories, principles, techniques, and technologies of KM.

Originality/value

The empirical findings of the study are the original views and responses of LIS academics who are experienced in KM.

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Essam Mansour

The key purpose of this study is to gain an insight into the quality of the scholarly publishing and refereeing system used by Emerald’s Library and Information Science (

Abstract

Purpose

The key purpose of this study is to gain an insight into the quality of the scholarly publishing and refereeing system used by Emerald’s Library and Information Science (LIS) journals from the perspectives of the Arab authors who are publishing in this wide-ranging database. It also tries to provide helpful guidance for authors to fit their authorship for publication.

Design/methodology/approach

Of the total 3,846 papers published in Emerald’s LIS journals in the past five years (the beginning of 2011 to the end of 2015), there were only 81 papers (research/technical/conceptual papers and case studies only) authored by Arabs, representing 2.11 per cent of the whole productivity in the discipline of the LIS in Emerald in this period. Corresponding authors (mostly first authors) (n = 73) were contacted to answer the questionnaire of the study. Five of those 73 authors could not be reached because of the lack of validity of their e-mails. Out of the remaining authors (n = 68), 47 returned their valid questionnaires, representing 69.1 per cent of the total number of the Arab authors.

Findings

This study revealed that the Arab male authors dominated (78.7 per cent) the publishing in Emerald’s LIS journals in the past five years. Two-thirds of the Arab authors are aged between 36 to 45 years (mostly males with doctoral degrees), followed by those authors (17 per cent) who are aged between 46 to 50 years (mostly males with doctoral degrees) and by those authors (12.8 per cent) aged between 31 to 35 years (all are males and half of them hold a doctorate). The study also found that there was a direct proportionality between the Arab authors’ research experience with the history of publishing in Emerald’s LIS journals because the more research experience they have, the greater the number of their research history of publishing in Emerald. Assistant Professors (44.7 per cent) were found to be the group most frequently publishing in Emeralds’ LIS journals with research experience ranging between 11 and 20 years (mainly with a publishing history of five years), followed by lectures with research experience ranging between 1 and 20 years (mostly with a publishing history of five years) and then associate professors with research experience ranging between 11 and 20 years (mostly with a publishing history of ten years). The findings also found that most Arab authors (80.9 per cent) publishing in Emerald’s LIS journals preferred the sole or single authorship. The co-authorship or co-authored works were not much preferred by many of them. A large number (87.2 per cent) of the Arab authors, who are mainly described as experts and advanced authors in using the Emerald refereeing system, see this system, at least, as good. Regarding the reasons/factors to submit articles to Emerald’s LIS journals, this study revealed that the availability of papers in electronic formats, the journal’s impact factor, the association with the research area, the academic coverage of the journal, abstracting and indexing services, the availability in hard copy, the speed of reviewing, the size of readership, the ease of acceptance and the standing of the editorial board were the most significant reasons and factors to submit articles papers for publication in Emerald. The Arab authors in this study have shown considerable positive attitude and perceptions towards the publishing in Emerald’s LIS journals because all of them, at least, agree that publishing in Emerald can increase the speed of finding information and reduce the use of papers. A very large number of them also showed that such publishing may also help create a wider spread, build confidence, be convenient, secure credibility and be objective. Compared to their positive attitude and perceptions towards the publishing in Emerald’s LIS journals, Arab authors had little negative feelings about the publishing in these journals. A few of them (8.5 per cent) have shown a considerable concern about the time it takes in reviewing their articles because they reported that such publishing requires a long time for the peer review process, and it also needs long communications with the editorial staff; this may affect negatively on the time of the research topic. Not being their first language, a few Arab authors (8.5 per cent) have also shown a considerable concern about the use of English being the publishing language in Emerald, as it requires certain skills needed not only to publish their articles but also to deal with the Emerald system and communicate with editorial staff. Overall, this small percentage did not affect the rest of the authors who described their concerns about this obstacle as modest to some extent. Although there is a lot of enthusiasm for publication in Emerald showed by the Arab authors, there have been also some concerns expressed by them towards that goal. A modest number of the Arab authors suggested that the lack of language skills needed for publishing in Emerald, followed by the lack of patience needed to wait for issuing papers, the technical problems related to the system and its interface and the lack of technical skills needed for publishing, as well as the time needed to be online, were significant to them when looking to publish in Emerald.

Research limitations/implications

The paper investigates the quality of the scholarly publishing and refereeing system used in Emerald’s LIS journals from the perspectives of Arab authors who are publishing in this wide-ranging database. Such topic, to date, has limited previous research, as well as the limited size of the representation of the Arab authors in Emerald’s LIS journals in the past five years, which is due logically to the lack of their research and scientific contributions in this database during this period. Future research could focus on varied contexts or samples, such as other different disciplines and nationalities.

Practical implications

The paper provides valuable insight into the perception about the Emerald’s peer review quality by a very significant client group – academic researchers representing 22 Arab countries.

Originality/value

This study is to be the first one of its kind conducted by one of the Arab authors who has published in Emerald’s LIS journals. Being one of the few studies about the scholarly communication/productivity/collaboration of Arab authors in these journals, this study considers a pioneer one among many studies conducted in scholarly communication, especially with Arab authors.

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Tessa Withorn, Jillian Eslami, Hannah Lee, Maggie Clarke, Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Anthony Andora, Amalia Castañeda, Alexandra Mitchell, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Wendolyn Vermeer and Aric Haas

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2020.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 440 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested in a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Younis Al-Shwabkah, Faten Hamad, Nashrawan Taha and Maha Al-Fadel

This study aims to explore undergraduate students’ perceptions of teaching information and communication technology (ICT) courses in the library and information science …

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore undergraduate students’ perceptions of teaching information and communication technology (ICT) courses in the library and information science (LIS) program in Jordanian universities. It also aims at investigating the correlation between the impact of some variables, namely, gender, the type of university, academic year and student GPA on and their students’ views.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative methods were adopted. A questionnaire with 40 items was distributed on a stratified random sample of 220 students from four LIS departments in Jordan and, of whom, 203 responded with a response rate of 92.3 per cent.

Findings

Research findings indicated that teaching ICT courses was considered highly important. Students stressed on the importance of incorporating ICT courses in LIS programs. They also pointed out the competence of the teaching staff and the efficacy of their teaching methods. On the other hand, student assessments of the curriculum content, the teaching pedagogy and methods of assessment were on an average level. In addition, the findings indicated that resources and facilities necessary to teach ICT courses were available and adequate. It was noted that the “university” was the only factor that affected results; the University of Jordan students showed a higher satisfaction. The other factors (gender, academic year and GPA) did not appear to affect student perceptions.

Originality/value

Previous studies investigated the importance of teaching ICT courses in general but did not consider students’ perceptions. Only a few studies discussed students’ perceptions of studying ICT courses but in a different context, i.e. Kuwait. This research focused on students’ perceptions of studying ICT in Jordan as a new geographic region. This would be beneficial for other developing countries to learn from this experience and refine their ICT curricula and LIS programs accordingly.

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2017

Madhura Deodhar and Sushama Powdwal

The purpose of this paper is to report the research findings of an evaluation of the impact of continuing education programs (CEPs) on library information science (LIS

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the research findings of an evaluation of the impact of continuing education programs (CEPs) on library information science (LIS) professionals of academic libraries in Mumbai, India. The paper also introduces Donald Kirkpatrick model of training evaluation for Library Science research in the area of program evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

The impact of CEPs was evaluated using Donald Kirkpatrick model of training evaluation using survey method. The impact was evaluated at four levels; reaction, learning, behavior and results. The population of the present study included 344 LIS professionals working at colleges libraries affiliated to University of Mumbai and Shreemati Nathibai Damodar Thackersey (SNDT) Women’s University in Mumbai, India. The data collected through questionnaire were supplemented by five specimen interviews of heads of institutions of the academic librarians who had attended more than five CEPs in five years, 2009-2013.

Findings

The findings of the study revealed that professionals were satisfied with CEP attendance; keen on gaining more knowledge and transferring the acquired knowledge and skills at their workplaces and interested in implementing the learning to achieve results. The reasons given by academic librarians on not implementing the learning in the library indicated that there were hindrances like lack of management support, lack of technical expertise, inadequate staff in the library, poor IT Infrastructure, etc. in transferring the learning at work.

Research limitations/implications

The study was based on self-perceptions of respondents. The limitation of self-perception was eliminated to some extent by supplementing qualitative data wherever required. CEPs included conferences, seminars, workshops, refresher courses, orientation programs and online courses. Pre-test and post-test recommended by the Kirkpatrick model could not be conducted as the researcher has not adopted experimental design. The data of feedback from the organizers and content of the CEPs attended by respondents were not analyzed in the study.

Practical implications

The paper describes the implementation of Kirkpatrick model to evaluate the CEPs, which can be used by the organizers or institutions to evaluate the impact of CEPs in future. This will help them to improve upon the contents of CEPs making them more relevant and effective.

Social implications

Evaluation of CEPs will be useful to ensure the effectiveness of CEPs and performance of LIS professionals.

Originality/value

This paper reports an original research initiative undertaken to evaluate the impact of CEPs attended by LIS professionals of Indian academic libraries in Mumbai, India. It fills the gap in LIS research. The application of Donald Kirkpatrick model of Training evaluation is also valuable for LIS research.

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Keren Dali and Nadia Caidi

This paper aims to explore the attractiveness of Library and Information Science (LIS) careers to students and alumni and examine their decision-making process and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the attractiveness of Library and Information Science (LIS) careers to students and alumni and examine their decision-making process and perceptions of the field with an eye on discerning the best ways to build and develop the recruitment narrative.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reached out to 57 LIS graduate programs in Canada and the USA accredited by the American Library Association through a Web-based survey; the questions presented a combination of multiple-choice, short-answer and open-ended questions and generated a wealth of quantitative and qualitative data.

Findings

The online survey has disclosed that students may not have an in-depth understanding of current trends, the diversity of LIS professions and the wider applications of their education. A significant disconnect exists in how the goals of LIS education are seen by certain groups of practitioners, students and faculty members.

Originality/value

Creating a program narrative for the purposes of recruitment and retention, departments should not only capitalize on the reach of the internet and the experiences of successful practitioners. They should also ensure that faculty know their students’ personal backgrounds, that students empathize with demands of contemporary academia and that a promotional message connects pragmatic educational goals to broader social applications. By exposing and embracing the complexity of LIS education and practice, the paper chooses a discursive path to start a conversation among major stakeholders.

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Lynsey Taylor and Peter Willett

The purpose of this paper is to investigate UK academics’ views of the importance and prestige of journals relevant to library and information science (LIS) teaching and research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate UK academics’ views of the importance and prestige of journals relevant to library and information science (LIS) teaching and research.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire, based on one used previously in the USA, was sent to UK academics involved in LIS teaching and research. The questionnaire asked respondents to rate the importance of 87 LIS journals, to suggest others that were of importance to them but that were not amongst the 87, and to identify the five most prestigious journals for promotion purposes. In addition, those journals were identified that had figured in institutional submissions to the LIS Unit of Assessment in Research Excellence Framework (REF).

Findings

While there was a fair measure of overall agreement between US and UK rankings of the 87 journals, with both highlighting the standing of the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology and of the Journal of Documentation, some substantial differences were also noted. Evidence is presented for a strong locational component to academics’ assessments of journal prestige, and analysis of the REF2014 submissions demonstrates the highly inter-disciplinary nature of LIS research in the UK.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is small, comprising 30 completed responses.

Originality/value

This is the first study to report UK academics’ rankings of LIS journals, and to compare those with comparable data for US academics.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2019

Amjid Khan and Shamshad Ahmed

This paper aims to examine the relationships between the perceptions of library and information science (LIS) professionals about organizational culture (OC) and lifelong…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationships between the perceptions of library and information science (LIS) professionals about organizational culture (OC) and lifelong learning (LLL) in the university libraries of Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a positivist paradigm and quantitative research method to examine the relationships between OC and the dimensions of LLL among the LIS professionals in the university libraries of Pakistan. Using a stratified sampling technique, data were collected, through a structured questionnaire, from a sample of 226 LIS professionals (out of N = 545) working in 97 university libraries of the country.

Findings

The results of the study found that the respondents’ perceptions about OC had positively correlated with their LLL in the study context. All the dimensions of OC predicted respondents’ LLL practices in the study context.

Practical implications

This study has practical implications for library leadership and LIS professionals to determine how the university libraries are likely to behave with LLL practices to accomplish the target goals.

Social implications

The results of this study can be used as supporting source and rationale for university libraries to develop strategic plans and policies for implementing LLL practices among LIS professionals of academic libraries.

Originality/value

The published literature shows the absence of any credible research carried out to know the influence of OC on LLL of LIS professionals.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 January 2012

Luki Wijayanti

This chapter reports results from a study into the current state of library and information science (LIS) research in Indonesia and the major actors in the Indonesian LIS

Abstract

This chapter reports results from a study into the current state of library and information science (LIS) research in Indonesia and the major actors in the Indonesian LIS research environment. The study used a qualitative case study method. The findings show (1) a low level of LIS research activities by Indonesian academicians, library practitioners and students and (2) an emphasis on applied research into collection processes and developments, user perception and satisfaction with library services, effectiveness of libraries and information centre management and information technology. Further problems for Indonesian LIS research include the poor understanding of the relevance of LIS research, the role of LIS researchers and the conflict of values and beliefs among the actors in the Indonesian LIS environment. However, the prospects for Indonesian LIS research are improving with a growing awareness of the importance of LIS research for Indonesia. LIS research quality in Indonesia is being enhanced through formal education, research competition and journal research reports since the 2000s. Indonesian LIS actors need to learn research methodologies and cooperate with each other more intensively to improve their research skills. Recommendations for improving Indonesian LIS research include, changing the mindset of researchers to create a research climate, building research networks, improving knowledge access, changing regulations (job description, performance evaluation of system, credit points), providing more funding for LIS research and improving LIS curriculums. All Indonesian LIS actors need to communicate with each other to create acceptable values, norms and beliefs to improve Indonesian LIS research.

Details

Library and Information Science Trends and Research: Asia-Oceania
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-470-2

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