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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2007

Toni Weller and Jutta Haider

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the current situation of academic LIS research, specifically in the UK and to provide some thoughts considering the future of the…

933

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the current situation of academic LIS research, specifically in the UK and to provide some thoughts considering the future of the discipline. According to the opinion of the authors, this situation is characterised by a lack of cohesion, the need for justification of academic research in terms of its immediate applicability to the professional education of practitioners, and a disjuncture between the information profession and information research. The paper attempts to offer introductory thoughts regarding these circumstances.

Design/methodology/approach

The current situation is briefly reviewed and commented on from the authors’ viewpoint. Aspects of Pierre Bourdieu's study of the university as a hierarchically structured field of forces are considered. Some reference is made to previous literature.

Findings

The paper advances the view that the role of academic LIS research, debate and theory formation needs to be strengthened and that this needs to be reflected in the curriculum more strongly.

Originality/value

The paper attempts to highlight consistently overlooked contributing factors, and thus aims to shift the perspective towards role and position of LIS research within academia, rather than vis‐à‐vis the professional education it is connected to. It aims to stimulate discussion of the current situation, of how it can be perceived, and of ways to address it.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 59 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Roknuzzaman and Katsuhiro Umemoto

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how and why library and information science (LIS) academics have responded to the advent of knowledge management (KM).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how and why library and information science (LIS) academics have responded to the advent of knowledge management (KM).

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs an “experience survey” as a research strategy. Besides a review of scientific literature, this study conducts an e‐mail survey of 106 LIS academics of the world who have adopted KM education in their schools. A structured questionnaire comprising of both closed and open questions is used as the data collection instrument. The study analyses 57 filled‐in valid questionnaires following a mixed‐method approach of research.

Findings

The ways of knowing and degrees of understanding of KM concepts among the LIS academics are varied. Although KM is distinct from LIS, there exists a strong link between the two knowledge domains. LIS academics have positively responded to KM and considering its long root in LIS, they have argued for a serious consideration of the adoption of KM in LIS. The significant reasons for why the academics have responded to KM are the role of global knowledge economy, the natural evolution of the information field, interdisciplinarity, domain expansion, survival issues, and trends in technological innovations, etc.

Research limitations/implications

Many LIS schools do not come under investigation due to lack of their web accessibility.

Practical implications

It is suggested that LIS academics apply a holistic approach of KM and expand the knowledge domain of LIS by providing a sound understanding of the underlying concepts, theories, principles, techniques, and technologies of KM.

Originality/value

The empirical findings of the study are the original views and responses of LIS academics who are experienced in KM.

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Christian Schlögl and Wolfgang G. Stock

The aim of this paper is to explore the relationship between practitioners and academics in scholarly communication in library and information science (LIS) journals.

1270

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore the relationship between practitioners and academics in scholarly communication in library and information science (LIS) journals.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a reader survey, a citation analysis and an editor survey. The reader survey identifies both differences in journal rankings between practitioners and academics and the contribution of practitioners to LIS journals. The editor survey provides the proportions of practitioners and academics for the journals. The citation analysis shows the disparities in information exchange between the journals mainly preferred by practitioners and those more favoured by academics. Furthermore, it is possible to explore if practitioner journals differ from academic journals in the citation indicators and in other data collected in the editor survey.

Findings

It is found that: practitioners play an active role both as readers and as authors of articles in LIS journals; there is only a low level of information exchange between practitioner and academic journals; the placement of advertisements, the size of the editorial board, requirements concerning an extensive bibliography, the number and the half‐life of the references show a clear distinction between practitioner and academic journals. Interestingly, the impact factor did not turn out to be a good indicator to differentiate a practitioner from an academic journal.

Research limitations/implications

This research is only exploratory because it is based on separate studies previously conducted. Further research is also needed to explore the relationship between practitioners and academics more deeply.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in bringing together the findings from complementary studies (reader survey, editor survey and citation analysis) and identifying hypotheses for future research, especially with regards to the roles of and interactions between LIS practitioners and academics in scholarly communication.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 64 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 January 2012

Concepción S. Wilson, Mary Anne Kennan, Sebastian K. Boell and Patricia Willard

The central place that education has in the strength and well-being of any profession is widely accepted. Australia presents an interesting case study of a country where…

Abstract

The central place that education has in the strength and well-being of any profession is widely accepted. Australia presents an interesting case study of a country where Library and Information Studies (LIS) education moved from being conducted by practitioners under the guidance of the professional association to being provided in institutions of higher education in 1959. The 50 years (1959–2008) saw substantial changes in Australian LIS education with a rapid proliferation of schools which was later followed by closures, mergers and changes of focus. This chapter charts LIS education during this period focusing on organizational and structural aspects of the placement of LIS education in tertiary institutions, on the academization of LIS educators who had in the early days mainly been drawn from practice, and on the development of LIS educators as academic researchers and authors as represented by their productivity and visibility in national and international databases. In addition to giving an account of these areas of LIS education over the 50 years, the chapter seeks to offer explanations for what has occurred and some views of strategies which may assist the development of LIS education in Australia and in other countries which possess similar characteristics.

Details

Library and Information Science Trends and Research: Asia-Oceania
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-470-2

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Imas Maesaroh and Paul Genoni

This paper aims to provide 13 recommendations relating to the future of Indonesian library education based on the results of an extensive research study. The objective of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide 13 recommendations relating to the future of Indonesian library education based on the results of an extensive research study. The objective of the research was to investigate the desired level of educational qualifications and continued professional development of Indonesian academic librarians.

Design/methodology/approach

The research included surveys of Indonesian academic librarians and their managers, plus extensive interviewing of stakeholders. The recommendations have been developed on the basis of data gathered in this research.

Findings

There is an immediate need to raise the standards of Indonesian library education in order to enhance skills required of the contemporary library workforce. The Indonesian Librarian Association has an important role to play in raising the quality of library education and the status of librarians.

Practical implications

The recommendations have far‐reaching implications for Indonesian library education. There are also implications for the wider Indonesia library profession, and for the professional associations, in particular the Indonesian Librarian Association.

Originality/value

The recommendations are based on the first comprehensive analysis of the educational and continuing professional development needs of Indonesian academic librarians.

Details

New Library World, vol. 114 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Lynsey Taylor and Peter Willett

The purpose of this paper is to investigate UK academics’ views of the importance and prestige of journals relevant to library and information science (LIS) teaching and research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate UK academics’ views of the importance and prestige of journals relevant to library and information science (LIS) teaching and research.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire, based on one used previously in the USA, was sent to UK academics involved in LIS teaching and research. The questionnaire asked respondents to rate the importance of 87 LIS journals, to suggest others that were of importance to them but that were not amongst the 87, and to identify the five most prestigious journals for promotion purposes. In addition, those journals were identified that had figured in institutional submissions to the LIS Unit of Assessment in Research Excellence Framework (REF).

Findings

While there was a fair measure of overall agreement between US and UK rankings of the 87 journals, with both highlighting the standing of the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology and of the Journal of Documentation, some substantial differences were also noted. Evidence is presented for a strong locational component to academics’ assessments of journal prestige, and analysis of the REF2014 submissions demonstrates the highly inter-disciplinary nature of LIS research in the UK.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is small, comprising 30 completed responses.

Originality/value

This is the first study to report UK academics’ rankings of LIS journals, and to compare those with comparable data for US academics.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 June 2013

David A. Jank, Heting Chu and Michael E.D. Koenig

This chapter updates earlier research that analyzed mergers, collaborations, and similar trends in LIS education, and provides a more comprehensive current summary of…

Abstract

This chapter updates earlier research that analyzed mergers, collaborations, and similar trends in LIS education, and provides a more comprehensive current summary of those trends. Three distinct patterns are beginning to emerge in both organizational structure and collaboration: changes in the nature of LIS program partnerships within parent educational institutions; the impact on LIS education by prominent academic associations that are not reliant on ALA accreditation recognition; and the growth in the number and type of academic offerings in LIS schools themselves. Among some notable changes are the establishment of the Consortium of iSchools Asia Pacific (CiSAP), continued growth in the iSchool caucus and its increasing international membership. Additionally the number of dual degree master’s programs in which LIS departments partner is on the rise, as is the number of degrees now being offered at LIS schools (both at the undergraduate and graduate levels) that are not “traditional” MLS degrees. Inter-institutional collaborative MLIS programs are also emergent, evident in such programs as the Web-based Information Science Education (WISE) consortium. The data presented here seem to suggest that the face of LIS education continues to change as the 21st century gets underway.

Details

Mergers and Alliances: The Wider View
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-479-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Amanda Richardson

This paper aims to review the practitioner‐based teaching model for the MSc in Information and Library Management (ILM) at the University of the West of England (UWE)…

413

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the practitioner‐based teaching model for the MSc in Information and Library Management (ILM) at the University of the West of England (UWE). With input from students, practitioners and academics it considers the advantages and disadvantages of this approach and questions whether this is indeed the way forward for LIS education.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is used with views gained from students, practitioners and academic staff involved in the course. These views were gained from a combination of informal focus groups, informal interviews and a short e‐mail questionnaire asking current students their views on practitioner involvement in the course.

Findings

Findings reveal a model of practitioner‐based learning on the MSc ILM at UWE, which is meeting student and employer needs in terms of the skills they require in their future roles. Findings also raise questions as to how one can best ensure the involvement of practitioners in the future of the course; whether practitioner input is needed from a broader range of roles outside the library and information service; and how one can best maintain a balance of academic and practical skills.

Practical implications

The study suggests that more thought may be needed on securing practitioner involvement in the development and delivery of LIS education and further consideration on whether some of that involvement should be from a wider range of roles.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the need to consider how to best ensure the ongoing involvement of practitioners in LIS education, particularly those outside academic libraries, whilst maintaining the balance of academic rigour. It is valuable to those involved in designing and delivering course content and to those thinking about getting involved.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 62 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Leif Kajberg

Major collaborative schemes and initiatives in library and information science (LIS) education are outlined. It is observed that networking and mobility efforts in…

820

Abstract

Major collaborative schemes and initiatives in library and information science (LIS) education are outlined. It is observed that networking and mobility efforts in European LIS education have not yet produced spectacular or convincing results. On the whole, progress measured in synergy, co‐ordinated curricular structures, “joint ventures”, joint degrees, equivalence of qualifications, etc., is meagre. Some progress can be noted, but visible effects of intensified links between LIS schools in Europe are not conspicuous. Overall, transparency in the European LIS education seems to suffer. The Bologna Declaration (June, 1999) speaks of the “establishment of a European area of higher education” and outlines a number of objectives relevant to the pursuit of that purpose. In addressing the challenges of the Bologna Agreement for LIS education, discussions at an international meeting on globalisation and LIS at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, April 2002, are considered. The paper concludes by pointing to a number of steps that should be taken in working towards the objectives of the Bologna Agreement.

Details

New Library World, vol. 104 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Mohammad Nazim and Bhaskar Mukherjee

The purpose of this paper is to identify and validate the competencies perceived to be essential for library and information science (LIS) professionals keeping in view…

1823

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and validate the competencies perceived to be essential for library and information science (LIS) professionals keeping in view the needs of knowledge management (KM) applications in Indian academic libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

After reviewing relevant literature on the topic, a list of 25 competencies was prepared and organized in five categories. A link for attending the survey (list of KM competency statements) for the validation of competencies was sent via electronic mail to the teachers (95 in numbers) of 65 LIS schools where post‐graduate courses in LIS were offered. Respondents were asked to nominate the level of importance for validation of each proposed KM competency.

Findings

Findings of the study show a minor difference in the mean scores of five categories of competencies, but all the competencies were validated as needed. However, respondents were of the opinion that development of competencies in the field of management by LIS professionals is the most essential requirement for effective application of KM in Indian academic libraries.

Practical implications

Competencies validated by the respondents may be used as the groundwork for evaluation of current LIS educational programmes and revision of LIS curricula to impart a wide range of competencies to LIS students for working in KM environment.

Originality/value

Since no empirical study on required competencies for KM in India has been carried out before, this study closes this gap and provides guidelines to modify existing LIS curricula or LIS educational programmes to impart skills and competencies as validated by the academic community.

1 – 10 of over 3000