Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Yuqian Zhang, Anura De Zoysa and Kalinga Jagoda

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the understandability of an accounting textbooks written in English and the language learning motivation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the understandability of an accounting textbooks written in English and the language learning motivation of international students. Previous research assumed that native speakers of a language and second-language speakers would understand a given accounting text similarly and little attempt has been made to ascertain any individual differences in users’ capacity to read and understand a foreign language.

Design/methodology/approach

The 107 participants in this study comprised of full-time English as a Second Language postgraduate commerce students studying at a major Australian university. The authors used two-part questionnaire to examine the motivation of participants and the understandability of an accounting textbook using the Cloze test.

Findings

The results suggest that most international students have difficulty in understanding the textbook narratives used in this study. Furthermore, the results show that students’ motivation to learn a foreign language impacts on the understandability of an accounting textbook.

Practical implications

This study will help the educators, textbook publishers and students to understand the needs of ESL students. It is expected to provide guidance for authors and instructors to enhance the effectiveness of the accounting courses.

Originality/value

The accounting literature shows that there have been efforts by accounting researchers to measure the understandability of accounting texts or narratives. This research provided valuable insights of the learning challenges of international students and valuable recommendations to educators and publishers to enhance the delivery.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Fahad Ahmed Otaif

With the growing use of technology in second language learning (L2), many techniques of incorporating digital video in L2 learning and platforms of task implementation…

Abstract

Purpose

With the growing use of technology in second language learning (L2), many techniques of incorporating digital video in L2 learning and platforms of task implementation appear in the field, however, with little, if any, research on how tasks can be designed and developed in these contexts. Based on Chapelle (2001, 2014) task design criteria, the current paper evaluates specifically the “interactivity” of task design interface and how it may contribute towards either dispersing or directing the learners' attention (Robinson, 2011) during the process of task completion in video-based L2 listening.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative approach – mainly focus groups and interviews – the current study evaluated a number of tasks that were used for computer-based L2 listening when digital video is the mode of presentation. The participants, i.e. English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers and learners, were presented with a number of task designs to try and evaluate.

Findings

The findings revealed that some task designs are perceived to be less interactive and can disperse the learner's attentional resources during the process of task completion. They also shed light on the importance of improving EFL teachers' current practices of task design in computer-based L2 listening.

Originality/value

This paper has contributed to our growing understanding of interactivity in relation to video-based learning and its task designs.

Details

Saudi Journal of Language Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-243X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Daniel Bailey, Ashleigh Southam and Jamie Costley

This study aims to increase language learning (L2) output by incorporating a digital storytelling chatbot system (known as a “storybot”) that focused interactions on a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to increase language learning (L2) output by incorporating a digital storytelling chatbot system (known as a “storybot”) that focused interactions on a narrative. This study also sought to investigate student perceptions of these storybot interactions and improve on poor perception rates from previous studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This one-sample exploratory study was of student-storybot participation rates and student perceptions towards a storybot activity designed to increase L2 output. A combination of storybot participation analytics and survey analysis of student perception was carried out.

Findings

The use of storybots in the L2 class resulted in mixed participation rates. Students read nine times more than they wrote, indicating a high degree of reading comprehension necessary for storybot interaction. Survey results revealed that students believed storybots helped them meet their L2 goals, were relevant to their L2 and were easy to navigate.

Research limitations/implications

Interactions were through text messaging so no impact on speech or pronunciation could be observed. Further, the context was within a single university class in South Korea, restricting the generalization of findings to outside regions or with younger learners. Finally, while storybots proved to be valuable reading comprehension activities, the next step in this line of chatbot research should incorporate more writing prompts.

Practical implications

Storybots revealed explicit benefits to reading comprehension, as measured by cohesion between storybot delivered comprehension questions and student responses. Moreover, storybots can be used as examples for students in their own story creation, classroom forms to collect relevant student information regarding learning objectives and platforms for class quizzes.

Social implications

Storybots scaffold students through conversations, which abide by socio-pragmatic norms, providing models for L2 learners to incorporate in real-world text-based communication. Additionally, a wide range of idiomatic expressions is contextualized in comprehensible interactions that students can learn from the storybot then practice with friends.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing research on the use of chatbots for second L2 and offers specific insight into the use of narrative storybots as a means to increase L2 output and potentially benefit L2 reading comprehension.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Lee Jin Choi

With an increasing emphasis on the reading development of L2 learners of English and a growing body of literature on L2 reading, it is now time to examine what the current…

Abstract

Purpose

With an increasing emphasis on the reading development of L2 learners of English and a growing body of literature on L2 reading, it is now time to examine what the current research on L2 reading says about L2 learners’ reading development and to discuss what would be a desirable future for L2 reading studies. Focusing on the L2 reading of upper elementary, middle and high school students in L1 settings, this study aims to carefully, but critically, explore the major research studies published in the past three decades. In particular, it uses sociocultural and critical frameworks that view language as a social phenomenon and literacy as a constellation of socially contextualized practices to explore the issue of L2 reading.

Design/methodology/approach

To identify key findings about L2 reading, a systematic literature review of studies examining L2 reading in L1 settings was conducted. A critical examination and analysis of 91 studies on L2 reading for upper elementary students (Grades 4-12) are presented here. Based on the literature review, the major issues addressed in the previous section are revisited, and the requirements of future research on L2 reading are discussed.

Findings

Three major changes have taken place in L2 reading studies: from monolingual/L1-based research to multilingual/L2-based research; developing the socially situated model of literacy (literacies); and adopting a sociocultural and critical lens: L2 reading and L2 reading assessment. Based on the critical review of the major research studies published in the past three decades, this paper identifies the research and approach required to advance the field of L2 reading: the continua of L1 and L2 reading, macro–micro analysis of L2 reading context and diversification of L2 reading research.

Originality/value

Based on a systematic literature review, it demonstrates the current trends in L2 reading research, to examine the key findings and implications, and to identify what additional research or paradigms are required to advance the field. The literature review presented in this paper helps language educators, policy-makers and school administers at all levels in both first-and second-language contexts to better understand the rapidly increasing number of L2 English learners in L1 classroom settings.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2014

Lucía I. Méndez

This chapter examines factors impacting vocabulary development in preschool dual language learners, providing a cultural and linguistic perspective on vocabulary…

Abstract

This chapter examines factors impacting vocabulary development in preschool dual language learners, providing a cultural and linguistic perspective on vocabulary instruction in this population. Through a multidisciplinary review of the research literature, instructional strategies that can support vocabulary development in this population are identified. The chapter concludes with a detailed illustration of how these strategies can be incorporated into a culturally linguistically responsive vocabulary approach for Latino preschoolers.

Details

Early Childhood and Special Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-459-6

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Structural Models of Wage and Employment Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44452-089-0

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 November 2021

Shin'ichiro Ishikawa

Using a newly compiled corpus module consisting of utterances from Asian learners during L2 English interviews, this study examined how Asian EFL learners' L1s (Chinese…

Abstract

Purpose

Using a newly compiled corpus module consisting of utterances from Asian learners during L2 English interviews, this study examined how Asian EFL learners' L1s (Chinese, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese and Thai), their L2 proficiency levels (A2, B1 low, B1 upper and B2+) and speech task types (picture descriptions, roleplays and QA-based conversations) affected four aspects of vocabulary usage (number of tokens, standardized type/token ratio, mean word length and mean sentence length).

Design/methodology/approach

Four aspects concern speech fluency, lexical richness, lexical complexity and structural complexity, respectively.

Findings

Subsequent corpus-based quantitative data analyses revealed that (1) learner/native speaker differences existed during the conversation and roleplay tasks in terms of the number of tokens, type/token ratio and sentence length; (2) an L1 group effect existed in all three task types in terms of the number of tokens and sentence length; (3) an L2 proficiency effect existed in all three task types in terms of the number of tokens, type-token ratio and sentence length; and (4) the usage of high-frequency vocabulary was influenced more strongly by the task type and it was classified into four types: Type A vocabulary for grammar control, Type B vocabulary for speech maintenance, Type C vocabulary for negotiation and persuasion and Type D vocabulary for novice learners.

Originality/value

These findings provide clues for better understanding L2 English vocabulary usage among Asian learners during speech.

Details

PSU Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Chiann‐Ru Song

The importance of critical thinking disposition (CTD) in second language (L2) university students' writing is a topic rarely discussed. The purpose of this research paper…

1459

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of critical thinking disposition (CTD) in second language (L2) university students' writing is a topic rarely discussed. The purpose of this research paper is to examine L2 university students' CTD during the writing process. Research questions discussed in this paper encompass the CT dispositions and characteristics of L2 university students in online writing environments. Measuring CTD and CTD training via online collaborative peer review were the two grounding themes of this study.

Design/methodology/approach

A five‐point Likert scale online questionnaire which included two open‐ended questions was developed to assess CTD. A factor analysis and a cluster analysis were preformed on the data. A discriminate analysis determined the number of viable clusters and a one‐way ANOVA was performed to compare differences, with qualitative interview data to supplement. The data set for CTD measurement was a matrix consisting of 27 participants and P variables.

Findings

The findings reveal that the CTD characteristics of L2s include open‐mindedness, systematicity and inquisitiveness, and low interaction/motivation.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include a small sample size that mimics the researcher's anticipations, but the findings would be strengthened by a larger sample. A lack of sensitivity and generalisability could be corrected in the future by using broader subject matter within an online educational web site.

Originality/value

Knowledge of the CTD characteristics of L2s would allow interface designers to take into account different CTDs in developing L2 online collaborative educational web sites. This study outlines the first step in developing online collaborative educational games that allow L2 university students to improve their writing abilities by considering various CTDs.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Kevin Curran, Michelle Murray and Martin Christian

Libraries as they are known today can be defined by the term Library 1.0. This defines the way resources are kept on shelves or at a computer behind a login. These…

5799

Abstract

Purpose

Libraries as they are known today can be defined by the term Library 1.0. This defines the way resources are kept on shelves or at a computer behind a login. These resources can be taken from a shelf, checked out to the librarian, taken home for a certain length of time and absorbed, and then taken back to the library for someone else to use. Library 1.0 is a one‐directional service that takes people to the information that they require. Library 2.0 – or L2 as it is now more commonly addressed as – aims to take the information to the people by bringing the library service to the internet and getting the users more involved by encouraging feedback participation. This paper seeks to present an overview of Library 2.0.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents an overview of Web 2.0 including definitions, technologies involved and sites currently advocated as examples of Web 2.0.

Findings

The major difference between Library 1.0 and L2 is that Library 1.0 only allows for a one‐way flow of information while L2 is a read‐write library that gives library users the power to decide the service that they get. L2 reinforces the role libraries play in the community by building on today's best and continually improving the service. L2 can be summarized as being user‐driven and aiming to save each library user time in retrieving information.

Originality/value

Libraries have been around for centuries and are considered places in which books, journals, CDs, etc. are kept for reference or for borrowing by the public. The term L2 was believed to have been first made by Michael Casey in his blog LibraryCrunch. Chad and Paul Miller describe Library 2.0 (L2) as a concept, very different from the service one knows today, that operates according to the expectations of today's users. They state that with this concept the library will make information available wherever and whenever the user requires it. One point to note here is that this concept is not about replacing the 1.0 technology already being used but rather about adding additional functionality.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

K. Sivakumar

This article aims to extend the price‐quality trade‐off framework to derive new results for differential pricing strategies for brands in different brand tiers. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to extend the price‐quality trade‐off framework to derive new results for differential pricing strategies for brands in different brand tiers. The results are demonstrated for different market configurations.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework based on the quality‐price trade‐off from existing literature is used to analytically derive research hypotheses regarding pricing strategies. The results are demonstrated empirically by extending previously published results.

Findings

The study reveals that optimal pricing strategies are dependent on the tier to which the brands belong. Promotional pricing is better for high‐tier brands, while everyday low price is better for low‐tier brands. Similarly, deep and infrequent price promotions are better for high‐tier brands, while shallow and frequent promotions are better for low‐tier brands.

Practical implications

The findings offer some important implications of the brand‐tier competition framework for determining optimal pricing strategies and can inform pricing strategies for brands in different tiers.

Originality/value

Asymmetric inter‐tier competition is demonstrated for different market configurations, and the framework is used to derive optimal pricing strategy implications for brands in different tiers.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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