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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1961

The news that the Ministry of Education has set up two Working Parties in connection with the proposed new Public Libraries Bill is welcome and gives further hope that…

Abstract

The news that the Ministry of Education has set up two Working Parties in connection with the proposed new Public Libraries Bill is welcome and gives further hope that such a Bill will appear in the not too distant future. From the constitutions of these Working Parties, which seem to us to be fairly representative of all interests, it would appear that the first is going to concern itself with the main aspects of the Roberts Report recommendations, while the second will be given the task of studying the problems of library co‐operation. On the first party, county libraries are represented by Miss Paulin and Mr. Budge, while Wales is represented by Mr. A. Edwards, librarian of the Cardiganshire and Aberystwyth Joint Library. Mr. D. I. Colley, the city librarian of Manchester, will be keeping a watching brief on behalf of the large libraries, but it should not be forgotten that he is also a member of the Libraries Committee of the Association of Municipal Corporations. Mr. Gardner is rightly there, perhaps not only as librarian of Luton but also as chairman of the Library Association's Executive Committee. The Smaller Libraries Group can surely have no complaints, for out of the ten members of Working Party No. I there are three librarians from smaller libraries, these being Mr. Helliwell of Winchester, Mr. Christopher of Penge and Mr. Parker of Ilkley. This Working Party is completed by two legal representatives in Mr. W. B. Murgatroyd, who is Town Clerk of Hornsey, and Mr. J. H. Oldham, who is Assistant County Solicitor for Kent.

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New Library World, vol. 62 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1956

SUN and moon and the substantial natural beauty of Folkestone combined to give the Library Association Conference this year an almost ideal setting. Moreover, it was a…

Abstract

SUN and moon and the substantial natural beauty of Folkestone combined to give the Library Association Conference this year an almost ideal setting. Moreover, it was a Conference equable in speech and with an atmosphere of good will and good sense not always present in such variegated company. This postlude to an abominable summer will be remembered with pleasure. One can say that the choice of President was entirely justified. Mr. Sydney, who spoke often with modest, often almost depreciatory tones, proved to be master of the art of handling an audience, deft in phrase, genial in his introductions and words of thanks, and as skilful at the Annual General Meeting in guiding the choppy waves of debate as we could desire him to have been. Further, the Presidential Address was a reflection of many of these qualities and in substance a candid review of the pleasures, opportunities, high aspirations which were those of many librarians but which were so often frustrated by the limitations of local thinking and, often, pinchbeck “economy”. At the same time, he emphasised the great developments that were taking place and the fail that libraries today were becoming more nationally and internationally pervasive and related. It seemed to be a most memorable address.

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New Library World, vol. 58 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1960

ONLY one or two topics of the Scarborough Conference will remain firmly in the minds of most of us. Most firmly, and more clearly than before, will be that of the National…

Abstract

ONLY one or two topics of the Scarborough Conference will remain firmly in the minds of most of us. Most firmly, and more clearly than before, will be that of the National Lending Library and Dr. Urquhart's exposition of it or what it is intended to be. It may give no comfort, so far as librarianship is concerned, to existing librarians, but there is little that the public librarian has to fear from it. The second impression that remains is the acute awareness now prevalent of the need for science and technical training in school and college for many more men and women and our relation to that fact. The third was the so often expressed nervousness about the status of the librarian. Fourthly, was the local collection in the light of the ever‐changing character and habits of the people. The President's address was a dignified and grave statement of ideals, in the definition of libraries and librarianship, in book acquirement, reader‐service and in appreciation of the personalities who have made librarianship. It did not produce the press so fine an utterance demanded. What are we to say of the heading a great London paper gave to its two‐inch paragraph devoted to the first day of our Conference: “Librarians are told to be courteous”? To our regret we were unable to hear Mr. O'Leary's paper; judging from the summary in the Programme it was a fine exercise in robust commonsense. We content ourselves in this Editorial with further remarks on one or two of the matters we have mentioned above.

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New Library World, vol. 62 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1955

L.L. ARDERN

In Manchester, in June, 1824, one Hugh Pritchard publicly sold his wife, aged 26, for 3s. Earlier in the year there had been labour riots because the employers insisted on…

Abstract

In Manchester, in June, 1824, one Hugh Pritchard publicly sold his wife, aged 26, for 3s. Earlier in the year there had been labour riots because the employers insisted on increasing hours of work from eleven to twelve a day. Earlier still, in February, the treadmill was introduced into the New Bailey Prison.

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1934

OUR pages continue the discussion on book‐display, about which all has not been said by any means. The ingenious librarian will always sharpen his wits upon the attracting…

Abstract

OUR pages continue the discussion on book‐display, about which all has not been said by any means. The ingenious librarian will always sharpen his wits upon the attracting of readers, and the main problem in the matter is merely: what sort of reader is it most desirable to attract? We do not apologise for this reiteration, because it is the fundamental subject now facing librarians. We are not in the least moved by a comment in a contemporary that we are decrying libraries when we assert, and in spite of him we do assert, that fiction issues nearly all over London show a decline. That decline, we repeat, is due to the slight increase in the employment of readers, and to cheap fiction libraries. What the public librarian has to decide is if he shall compete with such libraries or more definitely diverge from them. If a middle course is preferred—as it usually is by Britons—what is that course? Ultimately, is the educated reader to be the standard for whom the library works, or the uneducated? Or, to put it another way, is the librarian in any way responsible for the quality of the books his community reads? Our readers, young and not so young, are invited to help us to answers to these live questions.

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New Library World, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1966

LOUGHBOROUGH was the first of the post‐war schools to be established in 1946. This resulted from negotiations of representatives of the Library Association Council with…

Abstract

LOUGHBOROUGH was the first of the post‐war schools to be established in 1946. This resulted from negotiations of representatives of the Library Association Council with technical and other colleges which followed their failure to secure facilities within the universities on the terms of the L.A. remaining the sole certificating body. The late Dr. Herbert Schofield accepted their terms and added a library school to already varied fields of training within his college.

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New Library World, vol. 67 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1950

The papers in this issue were given at the 25th Annual Conference, held at Bristol University from 22nd to 25th September, 1950. Some 230 delegates from the British Isles…

Abstract

The papers in this issue were given at the 25th Annual Conference, held at Bristol University from 22nd to 25th September, 1950. Some 230 delegates from the British Isles, the Commonwealth and Europe were welcomed to dinner on Friday evening by Sir Philip Morris, C.B.E., M.A., Vice‐Chancellor of the University, and Lady Morris. No papers were given on Friday evening, Mr. J. E. Wright arranging an informal dance after dinner.

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1951

E.M.R. DITMAS

FROM 5th to 8th October, 1951, Aslib was fortunate in holding its Annual Conference again at Ashorne Hill, near Leamington Spa, and our thanks are due for the third time…

Abstract

FROM 5th to 8th October, 1951, Aslib was fortunate in holding its Annual Conference again at Ashorne Hill, near Leamington Spa, and our thanks are due for the third time to Colonel and Mrs. J. H. Alexander and their staff for the excellence of the catering and domestic arrangements. The weather also co‐operated and sunshine displayed all the autumn beauties of the garden and countryside.

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1966

THE changes in London local government which came into operation on 1st April, 1965, cut across the existing regional library bureaux organisation.

Abstract

THE changes in London local government which came into operation on 1st April, 1965, cut across the existing regional library bureaux organisation.

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New Library World, vol. 68 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1967

I HAVE sometimes been asked whether I am conscious, as the present editor of THE LIBRARY WORLD, of the spirit and influence of its founder, James Duff Brown, and of his…

Abstract

I HAVE sometimes been asked whether I am conscious, as the present editor of THE LIBRARY WORLD, of the spirit and influence of its founder, James Duff Brown, and of his editorial successors, who included J. D. Stewart and W. C. Berwick Sayers. The answer is that of course I am—how could it be otherwise?

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New Library World, vol. 68 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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