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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2013

Yu Kyoum Kim, Galen T Trail and Marshall J Magnusen

In sports consumer behaviour literature only a small amount of variance in attendance is explained bymotives. One possible explanation for this is the existence of a third…

Abstract

In sports consumer behaviour literature only a small amount of variance in attendance is explained by motives. One possible explanation for this is the existence of a third factor which moderates this relationship between the motives and attendance. Individuals who strongly identify with a sports team demonstrate distinctly different behavioural patterns from weakly identified individuals. Identification may, therefore, serve as a moderator. Accordingly, two hypotheses are generated: (a) the relationship between motives and attendance intention ranges from weak to moderate; and (b) the overarching construct of Identification (Team Identification) moderates the influence of motives on attendance intention. Participants were 207 United States of America National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division IA student-subjects. Instrumentation includes measures of motivation, points of attachment and attendance intention. Through hierarchical Confirmatory Factor Analysis, regression analyses and latent variable scores approach, the results largely support both hypotheses.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1969

L.J. Salmon, L.J. Winn and L.J. Karminski

February 28, 1969 Damages — Special damage — Loss of earnings between accident and trial — “Compensationitis” — Plaintiff's minor physical injuries — Anxiety neurosis …

Abstract

February 28, 1969 Damages — Special damage — Loss of earnings between accident and trial — “Compensationitis” — Plaintiff's minor physical injuries — Anxiety neurosis — Functional pain for which no physical cause — Pain expected to vanish on determination of plaintiff's claim — Whether duty to prosecute action with due diligence — Plaintiff's dilatoriness in proceedings — Effect on special damage.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1967

L.J. Sellers, L.J. Davies and L.J. Russell

March 1, 1967 Negligence — Duty of care — Causation — Illiterate employee —Notice informing employees of availability of spats — Metal spinner's inability to read notice

Abstract

March 1, 1967 Negligence — Duty of care — Causation — Illiterate employee —Notice informing employees of availability of spats — Metal spinner's inability to read notice — Spinner splashed by molten metal — Spats not worn by majority of em‐ployees — Divergence of opinion among employees as to desirability of spats — Whether duty to provide spats fulfilled — Whether, if breach, a cause of accident.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 2 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1973

Edmund Davies, L.J. Megaw and L.J. James

February 27, 1973 Factory — Statutory duty — Fume — Inhalation of low concentrations of oxides of nitrogen over prolonged period — Chronic lung illness — Employers'…

Abstract

February 27, 1973 Factory — Statutory duty — Fume — Inhalation of low concentrations of oxides of nitrogen over prolonged period — Chronic lung illness — Employers' constructive knowledge of health hazard — Medical and other publications — Whether sufficiently indicating health hazard from 1965 onwards — Factories Act, 1961 (9 & 10 Eliz. II, c. 34), s. 63 (1).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

The Howard Shuttering Contractors case throws considerable light on the importance which the tribunals attach to warnings before dismissing an employee. In this case the…

Abstract

The Howard Shuttering Contractors case throws considerable light on the importance which the tribunals attach to warnings before dismissing an employee. In this case the tribunal took great pains to interpret the intention of the parties to the different site agreements, and it came to the conclusion that the agreed procedure was not followed. One other matter, which must be particularly noted by employers, is that where a final warning is required, this final warning must be “a warning”, and not the actual dismissal. So that where, for example, three warnings are to be given, the third must be a “warning”. It is after the employee has misconducted himself thereafter that the employer may dismiss.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Maureen Walsh Koricke and Teresa L. Scheid

Purpose – Patient safety and adverse events continue to present significant challenges to the US health care delivery system. Mandated reporting of adverse events can be a…

Abstract

Purpose – Patient safety and adverse events continue to present significant challenges to the US health care delivery system. Mandated reporting of adverse events can be a mechanism to “coerce” hospitals to identify, evaluate, and ultimately improve the quality and safety of patient care. The objective of this study is to determine if the coercion of mandated reporting impacts hospital patient safety scores.

Methods – We utilize the US News and World Report 2012–2013 Best Hospital Rankings which includes patient safety data from US teaching hospitals. The dependent variable is a composite measure of six indicators of patient safety during and after surgery. The independent variable is state mandated reporting of hospital adverse events. Three control variables are included: Magnet accreditation status, surgical volume, and the percentage of surgical admissions.

Findings – Using ordered logistic regression (n = 670 hospitals) we find a positive, but not significant, relationship between state mandated reporting and better patient safety scores.

Implications – This finding suggests that regulatory policy may not actually prompt performance improvement, and our data point to the need for further study of both formal and informal processes to manage patient safety within the hospital.

Originality – While increased reporting of adverse events has been linked to hospitals providing safer care, no research to date has examined whether or not state-level mandates actually lead to improvements in patient safety.

Details

Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Other Social Characteristics as Factors in Health and Health Care Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-798-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1974

Edmund Davies, L.J. Cairns and L.J. James

February 15, 1974 Master and servant — Wrongful dismissal — Gardener — Contract providing for six months' service and thereafter terminable annually — Obscene language on…

Abstract

February 15, 1974 Master and servant — Wrongful dismissal — Gardener — Contract providing for six months' service and thereafter terminable annually — Obscene language on one occasion by efficient gardener — Provocation by employer — Whether summary dismissal justified.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2020

Terry Eddy, Sarah Gee and Lamar Reams

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to gain insight into fans' perceptions, attitudes and behavioural responses toward their favourite college football team in the…

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to gain insight into fans' perceptions, attitudes and behavioural responses toward their favourite college football team in the context of a new beer sponsorship agreement. Specifically, the chapter examines differences in fans' attitudes and behaviours based on their gender, team identification and drinking habits.

Design/methodology/approach: A quantitative, cross-sectional survey design was employed. The sample was comprised of Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) workers who self-identified as college football fans. A hypothetical scenario was used as a manipulation, whereby participants were asked to imagine their favourite college football team had entered into a new alcohol sponsorship agreement while completing a questionnaire.

Findings: Highly identified fans exhibited more positive attitudes and behaviours after being presented with the hypothetical scenario than less identified fans. In terms of gender, female fans had increased attitudes toward sponsorship compared to males, and highly identified females had the most positive attitudes and behavioural intentions toward their favourite teams of any of the four subgroups in the study.

Research limitations/implications: The small sample sizes of some fan subgroups affected statistical power, which may have led to falsely insignificant findings. The range of favourite teams among the participants (50 universities) meant there was likely a high degree of variation between fans' previous experiences with beer/alcohol at college sport venues.

Originality/value: The study offers valuable insight into the intersection of sport fandom and gender in the context of alcohol sponsorship in US college sport, and is also among the first investigations of the effects of team identification on perceptions toward alcohol sponsorship.

Details

Sport, Alcohol and Social Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-842-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2020

David B. Szabla, Elizabeth Shaffer, Ashlie Mouw and Addelyne Turks

Despite the breadth of knowledge on self and identity formation across the study of organizations, the field of organizational development and change has limited research…

Abstract

Despite the breadth of knowledge on self and identity formation across the study of organizations, the field of organizational development and change has limited research on the construction of professional identity. Much has been written to describe the “self-concepts” of those practicing and researching in the field, but there have been no investigations that have explored how these “self-concepts” form. In addition, although women have contributed to defining the “self” in the field, men have held the dominant perspective on the subject. Thus, in this chapter, we address a disparity in the research by exploring the construction of professional identity in the field of organizational development and change, and we give voice to the renowned women who helped to build the field. Using the profiles of 17 American women included in The Palgrave Handbook of Organizational Change Thinkers, we perform a narrative analysis based upon the concepts and models prevalent in the literature on identity formation. By disentangling professional identity formation of the notable women in the field, we can begin to see the nuance and particularities involved in its construction and gain deeper understandings about effective ways to prepare individuals to work in and advance the field.

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