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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

L.E. Falkenberg, M.L. Monachello and L.C. Edlund

One of the major challenges for managing human resources in the 1990s is to appropriately respond to employees having to manage the dual responsibilities of home and work…

Abstract

One of the major challenges for managing human resources in the 1990s is to appropriately respond to employees having to manage the dual responsibilities of home and work (Paris, 1989). Balancing work and family has been considered a women's issue, with the question being whether women could handle both the home demands and the responsibilities of a paid job. Yet the entrance of women into the workforce has also required major role adjustments by their husbands. According to the traditional model of work, husbands prioritize work over family with the wife providing the necessary emotional and physical support to keep the husband in “good working order” (Pleck, 1977). In today's society, this model is no longer widely applicable, as men in dual earner families receive less emotional support than their single‐earner counterparts (Burke, & Weir, 1976; Keith, & Schafer, 1980) and tend to assume greater family responsibilities (Holahan, & Gilbert, 1979; Weingarten, 1978).

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 10 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 5 July 2017

Abstract

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Insights and Research on the Study of Gender and Intersectionality in International Airline Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-546-7

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Ulrica von Thiele Schwarz and Petra Lindfors

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects on fitness outcomes of a work-based physical exercise (PE) intervention among women working in older people’s care…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects on fitness outcomes of a work-based physical exercise (PE) intervention among women working in older people’s care. In addition, effects on productivity-related outcomes including work ability and sickness absence were studied.

Design/methodology/approach

Employees participated in a one-year intervention involving two one-hour weekly mandatory PE sessions. The intervention (n=13) was compared to referents (n=12). Fitness tests and self-reports on work ability and sickness absence were obtained before the intervention (T1), six months into the intervention and after 12 months.

Findings

Fitness test scores (corrected for age and weight) increased significantly over time in the intervention group but not among referents. Perceived exertion decreased significantly in the intervention group and increased significantly among referents. For self-rated work ability and sickness absence, no significant time or group differences emerged.

Research limitations/implications

Further research on larger groups of women is needed to delineate the effects of PE on self-rated productivity and performance.

Practical implications

Work-based PE programs can improve fitness among women in older people’s care.

Social implications

With previous research having primarily focussed on men, this study shows that women in blue-collar jobs also may benefit from taking part in work-based PE programs.

Originality/value

This paper makes an important contribution through its focus on the effects of a work-based PE program on fitness and possible relations to productivity, among employed women.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Tracy L. Dumas, Nancy P. Rothbard and Katherine W. Phillips

Many organizational efforts to improve co-worker relationships entail inducing employees to bring their “whole selves” into the workplace, which for employees often means…

Abstract

Many organizational efforts to improve co-worker relationships entail inducing employees to bring their “whole selves” into the workplace, which for employees often means disclosing personal experiences at work. Several psychological theories suggest that increased self-disclosure will lead to better relationships in organizational work groups. However, this chapter considers the factors impacting self-disclosure in demographically diverse settings. We posit that although self-disclosure has led to closer relationships in past research, it may not increase cohesion for employees in demographically diverse work groups, or those who are demographically dissimilar from the majority of their co-workers.

Details

Diversity and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-053-7

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Davide Secchi, Hong T.M. Bui and Kathleen Gamroth

The purpose of this paper is to investigate recent healthcare reform in the USA, which allows insurance companies to proactively intervene in improving the long-term…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate recent healthcare reform in the USA, which allows insurance companies to proactively intervene in improving the long-term health of employees, by providing wellness programs as part of their benefits package.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors present and analyze data on how employees of a large US Midwest “media and education” company (n=154) perceive economic incentives toward well-being. Data are collected using survey methods and analyzed with a logistic regression.

Findings

This study suggests that fairness, accessibility, intention to switch to a healthier lifestyle and desire to see more health-related initiatives affect the way employees seek to participate in the new involuntary wellness programs. By contrast, satisfaction, participation, and income to not affect how these new programs are perceived.

Research limitations/implications

These findings suggest that human resource managers should pay attention to employees who are not active in existing wellness programs, and provide support during the transition toward the new involuntary programs, to avoid potential frustration, demotivation, disengagement and, ultimately, decreasing performance among employees.

Originality/value

The study is among the first to analyze involuntary wellness programs in the USA, and it provides a basis on which to expand further studies. This research contributes to support the idea that employee wellness is unlikely to be enforced by rule or policy.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Patricia Genoe McLaren, Albert J. Mills and Gabrielle Durepos

The purpose of this paper is to understand how Drucker's work has been disseminated through the North American management textbook since 1940, and what this tells people…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how Drucker's work has been disseminated through the North American management textbook since 1940, and what this tells people about the wider issue of the social construction and dissemination of management knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a critical hermeneutic analysis of the presence and use of Drucker in over 500 management textbooks and the socio‐political context in which both Drucker's work and North American textbooks were written.

Findings

Paradoxically, while Drucker's work was found to be the most‐referenced of any management writer in the textbooks studied, his theories – apart from discussions of “Management by objectives” and the “Knowledge economy” – were rarely discussed. It is argued that the referencing of Drucker served more to legitimize selected points made by textbook authors than to discuss and build on Drucker's work. Explanation of the paradox is explored through the socio‐political contexts in which Drucker was writing, strongly suggesting that the North American textbook has developed a dominant scientivistic trope that construct business “knowledge” through the narrow lens of behavioural science.

Originality/value

While much writing can be found on the influence of Drucker on the business world and his status as a management guru, little is found on Drucker's body of work in the management textbook, which plays a key role in management education in North American business schools. The paper builds on recent management research on the role of socio‐political context in the shaping of management theory and knowledge, and makes a new contribution to one's understanding of the shaping and contours of management knowledge.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Bonnie Kelinske, Brad W. Mayer and Kuo‐Lane Chen

This study examines the differences between 64 male and 53 female college students in their perception of various benefits of sports participation. Potential benefits of…

Abstract

This study examines the differences between 64 male and 53 female college students in their perception of various benefits of sports participation. Potential benefits of sports participation include moral reasoning (caring versus fairness), socialization, competition, health and fitness, and leadership traits (masculine versus feminine). Responses to a questionnaire indicate that there is no difference between males and females on perceived benefits of sports participation with regard to moral reasoning, socialization, competition or health and fitness. There was, however, a significant difference between males and females with regard to competition as a motivating factor to participate in sports. There was also a significant difference between males and females in terms of leadership traits. Males perceived that sports gave them more masculine traits than what females perceived. There was no difference, however, between males and females in their perception of femininity leadership traits from sports participation.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

P. Rani Thanacoody, Timothy Bartram and Gian Casimir

The aim of this paper is to examine the effects of burnout and supervisory social support on the relationship between work‐family conflict, and intention to leave of…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the effects of burnout and supervisory social support on the relationship between work‐family conflict, and intention to leave of cancer workers in an Australian health care setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from a public hospital of 114 cancer workers were used to test a model of the consequences of work‐family conflict. The strength of the indirect effects of work‐family conflict on intention to leave via burnout will depend on supervisor support was tested by conducting a moderated mediation analysis.

Findings

Path analytic tests of moderated mediation supported the hypothesis that burnout mediates the relationship between work‐family conflict (i.e. work‐in‐family conflict and family‐in‐work) and intention to leave the organisation and that the mediation framework is stronger in the presence of higher social supervisory support. Implications are drawn for theory, research and practice.

Originality/value

This study applies the innovative statistical technique of moderated mediation analysis to demonstrate that burnout mediates the relationship between work‐family conflict and intention to leave the organisation and that the mediation framework is stronger in the presence of lower social supervisory support. In the context of the continued shortage of many clinician groups theses results shed further light on the appropriate course of action for hospital management.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Shelby D. Hunt and Robert M. Morgan

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

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