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Article

L.C.M. Boonekamp and A.A. de Roo

One of the major goals of the recent NHS reforms has been to makethe NHS more responsive to the needs of patients by offering morechoice. DHAs and budget‐holding GP…

Abstract

One of the major goals of the recent NHS reforms has been to make the NHS more responsive to the needs of patients by offering more choice. DHAs and budget‐holding GP practices have been given an incentive to obtain better value for money in purchasing health care services. In doing so they will have to take account of the existing GP referral patterns for as “key advisers” GPs can have major influence on patients′ choice of hospitals and consultants. Until now not much has been known about the structure, development and change of referral patterns and the factors responsible for changes. A study concerning these issues, conducted in The Netherlands, provides relevant information for the British situation. The results (non‐specificity of referrals, the role of tradition and distance in building up referred relationships and patients′ influence on breaking up relationships) suggest that GPs′ decisions in building up and changing referral networks take place implicitly. Concludes that GPs need more information in order to choose the best option. Information exchange within GP practices or local/regional GP groups is a means of improving the basis for decision making. At the same time there is a growing need for research into cost/quality ratios of care offered by health care providers. In Britain, DHAs could play an important role in initiating and intensifying this research.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article

Martin Fojt

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of the Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing is split into seven sections covering abstracts under the following headings…

Abstract

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of the Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing is split into seven sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Marketing strategy; Customer service; Sales management; Promotion; Product management; Marketing research/customer behavior; Sundry.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article

Martin Fojt

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of the Journal of Product & Brand Management is split into six sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Marketing…

Abstract

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of the Journal of Product & Brand Management is split into six sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Marketing strategy; Customer service; Pricing; Promotion; Marketing research, customer behavior; Product management.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

Lucie C.M. Boonekamp

The introduction of regulated competition in health care in severalWestern countries confronts health care providing organizations withchanging relationships, with their…

Abstract

The introduction of regulated competition in health care in several Western countries confronts health care providing organizations with changing relationships, with their environment and a need for knowledge and skills to analyse and improve their market position. Marketing receives more and more attention, as recent developments in this field of study provide a specific perspective on the relationships between an organization and external and internal parties. In doing so, a basis is offered for network management. A problem is that the existing marketing literature is not entirely appropriate for the specific characteristics of health care. After a description of the developments in marketing and its most recent key concepts, the applicability of these concepts in health‐care organizations is discussed. States that for the health‐care sector, dominated by complex networks of interorganizational relationships, the strategic marketing vision on relationships can be very useful. At the same time however, the operationalization of these concepts requires special attention and a distinct role of the management of health‐care organizations, because of the characteristics of such organizations and the specific type of their service delivery.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article

Martin Fojt

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of the Journal of Management in Medicine is split into seven sections covering abstracts under the following headings: General…

Abstract

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of the Journal of Management in Medicine is split into seven sections covering abstracts under the following headings: General Management; Personnel and Training; Quality in Health Care; Health Care Marketing; Financial Management; Information Technology; Leadership, management styles and decision making.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article

Mohammed A. Mahmoud and Robert E. Hinson

The aim of this study is to generate insights into whether market orientation – as defined by Kohli and Jaworski – is being practiced in the Ghanaian public sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to generate insights into whether market orientation – as defined by Kohli and Jaworski – is being practiced in the Ghanaian public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a case‐study of a local government, the Accra Metropolitan Assembly (the Assembly), semi‐structured interviews were conducted with departmental heads and their assistants to collect data. A total of 14 key informants participated in the interviews, and this sample size compared favourably with prior qualitative studies.

Findings

The assembly collects intelligence on citizens' present needs, their earning potential and the political and technological environment, ignoring citizens' satisfaction with development projects. Meetings are regularly held by the various units in the Assembly to share and discuss the generated intelligence, yet one can see little consideration of citizens' needs and their satisfaction with projects in these discussions.

Research limitations/implications

Further research into local governments across multiple regions in Ghana, or from a range of countries within Sub‐Saharan Africa, could provide an opportunity for greater generalisability of the results.

Practical implications

Local authorities must develop formal procedures for monitoring citizens' satisfaction with services, programmes and development projects. There is need to harness the intelligence inherent among staff with the use of focused communication or knowledge management strategies.

Originality/value

Recent efforts to extend market orientation application to the public sector have over‐concentrated on western countries. Based upon empirical evidence from a non‐western (Ghanaian) context, this study further assuages fears that market orientation may not be applicable to public institutions like local government.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article

Stephen Willcocks and Tony Conway

This article examines and comments on the role of clinical directors in the NHS (UK), with specific reference to the relevance of a strategic marketing emphasis. It…

Abstract

This article examines and comments on the role of clinical directors in the NHS (UK), with specific reference to the relevance of a strategic marketing emphasis. It utilises qualitative methodologies to collect data from stakeholders ‐ in particular, clinical directors and other managers ‐ from two NHS trust hospitals. It examines the extent to which a marketing approach is applicable to clinical managers working in these two hospitals. It utilises a conceptual framework devised by Kottler and Andreason, to highlight whether a marketing approach is, in fact, utilised by these managers. It suggests that a strategic marketing approach (based upon relationships), remains relevant to clinical management, notwithstanding recent changes in government policy.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Abstract

Details

Energy Security in Times of Economic Transition: Lessons from China
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-465-4

Content available
Book part

Kinga Zdunek, Manna Alma, Janine van Til, Karin Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Magda Boere-Boonekamp and Denise Alexander

Children’s voices are seldom heard directly. Most often, children, particularly young children, are represented by adults acting on their behalf who may or may not best…

Abstract

Children’s voices are seldom heard directly. Most often, children, particularly young children, are represented by adults acting on their behalf who may or may not best represent the child’s views or best interests. This can be beneficial or problematic, if the child’s needs are not appreciated or recognised. This chapter looks at the changing attitudes to listening to young people, and the growing recognition of the value of children’s needs, as well as the growing voices of the children themselves, who make their needs increasingly clear. The results of our Models of Child Health Appraised (MOCHA) interviews with children and young people via the DIPEx International organisation give us clear direction as to the importance children using primary care services place on being taken seriously, being listened to and being able to make their own decisions. Other researchers asked input from primary care professionals on children’s autonomy and how the current and future primary care systems can best address the needs of young people, as well as the placing of these issues in a wider cultural context, and how this influences and is influenced by children’s choices. Finally, we look at how the MOCHA country agents have reported the assessment of the importance and function of listening to young people in our research.

Details

Issues and Opportunities in Primary Health Care for Children in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-354-9

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Article

There are very few individuals who have studied the question of weights and measures who do not most strongly favour the decimal system. The disadvantages of the weights…

Abstract

There are very few individuals who have studied the question of weights and measures who do not most strongly favour the decimal system. The disadvantages of the weights and measures at present in use in the United Kingdom are indeed manifold. At the very commencement of life the schoolboy is expected to commit to memory the conglomerate mass of facts and figures which he usually refers to as “Tables,” and in this way the greater part of twelve months is absorbed. And when he has so learned them, what is the result? Immediately he leaves school he forgets the whole of them, unless he happens to enter a business‐house in which some of them are still in use; and it ought to be plain that the case would be very different were all our weights and measures divided or multiplied decimally. Instead of wasting twelve months, the pupil would almost be taught to understand the decimal system in two or three lessons, and so simple is the explanation that he would never be likely to forget it. There is perhaps no more interesting, ingenious and useful example of the decimal system than that in use in France. There the standard of length is the metre, the standard of capacity the cubic decimetre or the litre, while one cubic centimetre of distilled water weighs exactly one gramme, the standard of weight. Thus the measures of length, capacity and weight are most closely and usefully related. In the present English system there is absolutely no relationship between these weights and measures. Frequently a weight or measure bearing the same name has a different value for different bodies. Take, for instance, the stone; for dead meat its value is 8 pounds, for live meat 14 pounds; and other instances will occur to anyone who happens to remember his “Tables.” How much simpler for the business man to reckon in multiples of ten for everything than in the present confusing jumble. Mental arithmetic in matters of buying and selling would become much easier, undoubtedly more accurate, and the possibility of petty fraud be far more remote, because even the most dense could rapidly calculate by using the decimal system.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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