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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

L.E. Falkenberg, M.L. Monachello and L.C. Edlund

One of the major challenges for managing human resources in the 1990s is to appropriately respond to employees having to manage the dual responsibilities of home and work…

Abstract

One of the major challenges for managing human resources in the 1990s is to appropriately respond to employees having to manage the dual responsibilities of home and work (Paris, 1989). Balancing work and family has been considered a women's issue, with the question being whether women could handle both the home demands and the responsibilities of a paid job. Yet the entrance of women into the workforce has also required major role adjustments by their husbands. According to the traditional model of work, husbands prioritize work over family with the wife providing the necessary emotional and physical support to keep the husband in “good working order” (Pleck, 1977). In today's society, this model is no longer widely applicable, as men in dual earner families receive less emotional support than their single‐earner counterparts (Burke, & Weir, 1976; Keith, & Schafer, 1980) and tend to assume greater family responsibilities (Holahan, & Gilbert, 1979; Weingarten, 1978).

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 10 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Karen Korabik and Roya Ayman

Recently, more and more North American women have been choosing to pursue careers in management and the professions. The invasion of women into these once exclusively…

Abstract

Recently, more and more North American women have been choosing to pursue careers in management and the professions. The invasion of women into these once exclusively masculine domains has been accompanied by a host of problems, many of which were unanticipated. In the articles presented here we examine the nature of these problems and provide some suggestions about what can be done to help resolve them.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 10 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Ralf Östermark

Considers the modelling of dynamic systems using biased regression and spectral methods. Provides evidence on the power of transfer function modelling for unravelling the…

Abstract

Considers the modelling of dynamic systems using biased regression and spectral methods. Provides evidence on the power of transfer function modelling for unravelling the empirical connection between endogenous and exogenous (control) variables in both regression type and spectral input‐output systems. The Multiple Input Transfer Function Noise Model – of specific value when the input variables are collinear – has previously been used to demonstrate the connection between macroeconomic forces and stock market pricing on a thin security market. Compares the adequacy of representative time and frequency domain algorithms for modelling observed data series. The estimations are done with the combined Transfer Function and Cartesian ARIMA Search algorithm of Östermark and Höglund and the CAPM/APM programs of Östermark.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2020

Roberta Guglielmetti Mugion, Flaminia Musella, Laura Di Pietro and Martina Toni

The linkage between internal and external satisfaction is an understudied topic in the service field. This study aims to address this gap by proposing an original research…

Abstract

Purpose

The linkage between internal and external satisfaction is an understudied topic in the service field. This study aims to address this gap by proposing an original research model, the service excellence chain (SEC), that connects the internal and external perspectives by conjoining performance-excellence models and the service-profit-chain approach. Theoretical assumptions and quantitative measures are proposed by using advanced statistical techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

The SEC is investigated through an empirical study in the healthcare sector, focusing on an Italian hospital and involving two of its core units. Qualitative and quantitative approaches were used. First, internal and external customer satisfaction were separately tested through structural equation modeling. The linkage between internal and external satisfaction is then proposed by mathematically defining a synthetic index, the internal and external customer satisfaction index (IEGSI), modeled through Bayesian networks (BNs) and object-oriented BNs to provide an overall measure able to predict organizational improvement.

Findings

The distinct measured models show good internal validity and adequate fit both for patients' and employees' perspectives. The IEGSI allows rigorously connecting internal and external satisfaction by developing conjoint scenarios for organizational improvement.

Originality/value

This study proposes the SEC model as an innovative way to connect internal and external satisfaction. The findings can be useful both for private and public organizations and may provide several useful insights for healthcare managers as well as for policy-makers in relation to developing strategies for improving service quality.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Jessica George

As Lorna Jowett and Stacey Abbott have pointed out, the US TV serial Supernatural owes much of its success to the way it combines horror with family drama, strengthening…

Abstract

As Lorna Jowett and Stacey Abbott have pointed out, the US TV serial Supernatural owes much of its success to the way it combines horror with family drama, strengthening the affective involvement of viewers in the lives of its protagonists, the monster-hunting Winchester brothers. The notion of home – presented variously as a domestic, feminine space from which the Winchesters and their compatriots are excluded; a mobile and contingent space of masculine bonding; and a hybrid space which allows for self-expression outside prescribed gender norms, but which also holds the potential for danger – is central.

Heather L. Duda has pointed to the ways monster hunters are excluded from the normative institutions of their societies, and this is certainly true of the Winchesters, who live in their family car and are unable to maintain ‘normal’ homes. Later seasons give them a home in the form of an underground bunker, not designed as a domestic space, but nonetheless a place where their hypermasculine behaviours can be relaxed. This chapter examines the tensions that emerge in this apparent move from a traditional narrative of the home as feminine space under threat to something more ambivalent, where masculine identity itself may be in danger.

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Television
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-103-2

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Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2012

Vetta Sanders Thompson, Anjanette Wells and Jacquelyn Coats

This chapter provides an overview of the role of socioeconomic status (SES) in health, including disease, health behaviors, and access to health. The literature on the…

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the role of socioeconomic status (SES) in health, including disease, health behaviors, and access to health. The literature on the social determinants of health is reviewed. The chapter then provides a review of the health status of the homeless, poor, and near-poor. The incidence and mortality rates for leading diseases and health behaviors are reviewed, in addition to issues of environmental exposures, access to care, and health literacy. SES is one of the strongest predictors of health status (Kahng, 2010; Kawachi & Kennedy, 1997; Link & Phelan, 1996). SES is important to health regardless of a person's social status and in general, the more advantaged individuals are, the better their health, and the more disadvantaged individuals are, the greater their chances of increased morbidity and mortality (Adler et al., 1994; Adler & Coriell, 1997, Kidder, Wolitski, Campsmith, & Nakamura, 2007; Zlotnick and Zerger, 2009).

The chapter provides an overview of strategies and policies to address the health needs of the poor and vulnerable in our society, including workplace wellness strategies and school-based health clinics. The authors suggest ways to extend these innovative practices. This chapter emphasizes an approach to addressing the health of the poor and near-poor that acknowledges the significant role that access to social and economic resources plays in the acquisition and maintenance of health. Recommendations for health interventions are focused on strengthening the utilization of community institutions to deliver needed services.

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Living on the Boundaries: Urban Marginality in National and International Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-032-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

Ralf Östermark and Rune Höglund

Evaluates an identification strategy, based on ridge regression, for multiple‐input models. The models are essentially the same as those of Edlund, but a far greater…

Abstract

Evaluates an identification strategy, based on ridge regression, for multiple‐input models. The models are essentially the same as those of Edlund, but a far greater number of replications, 1,000, is used in each of the 21 cases tested. Furthermore, users actually identified and estimated ARIMA models of the residuals in the identification procedure of impulse response weights, unlike Edlund, who used only theoretical noise models in filtering the input and output series. A short discussion of the underlying theory was presented in Part I, Kybernetes, Vol. 22 No. 4, 1993, pp. 47–53. In Part II the procedures and results of the empirical testing are published together with some concluding remarks.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Ralf Östermark and Rune Höglund

Evaluates an identification strategy, based on ridge regression, for mutliple‐input models. The corresponding computer algorithm was implemented on a VAX–8800 computer at…

Abstract

Evaluates an identification strategy, based on ridge regression, for mutliple‐input models. The corresponding computer algorithm was implemented on a VAX–8800 computer at the Computing Centre at A˚bo Akademi. The evaluation of the ridge‐regression method was carried out by simulations of different transfer‐function noise model structures. The models are essentially the same as those of Edlund, but a far greater number of replications, 1,000, is used in each of the 21 cases tested. Furthermore, uses actually identified and estimated ARIMA models of the residuals in the identification procedure of impulse response weights, unlike Edlund, who used only theoretical noise models in filtering the input and output series. A short discussion of the underlying theory is presented in Part I. The procedures and results of the empirical testing will be published in Part II in Kybernetes, Vol. 22 No. 7, 1993.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2018

Kathy Eljiz, David Greenfield, John Molineux and Terry Sloan

Unlocking and transferring skills and capabilities in individuals to the teams they work within, and across, is the key to positive organisational development and improved…

Abstract

Purpose

Unlocking and transferring skills and capabilities in individuals to the teams they work within, and across, is the key to positive organisational development and improved patient care. Using the “deep smarts” model, the purpose of this paper is to examine these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The “deep smarts” model is described, reviewed and proposed as a way of transferring knowledge and capabilities within healthcare organisations.

Findings

Effective healthcare delivery is achieved through, and continues to require, integrative care involving numerous, dispersed service providers. In the space of overlapping organisational boundaries, there is a need for “deep smarts” people who act as “boundary spanners”. These are critical integrative, networking roles employing clinical, organisational and people skills across multiple settings.

Research limitations/implications

Studies evaluating the barriers and enablers to the application of the deep smarts model and 13 knowledge development strategies proposed are required. Such future research will empirically and contemporary ground our understanding of organisational development in modern complex healthcare settings.

Practical implications

An organisation with “deep smarts” people – in managerial, auxiliary and clinical positions – has a greater capacity for integration and achieving improved patient-centred care.

Originality/value

In total, 13 developmental strategies, to transfer individual capabilities into organisational capability, are proposed. These strategies are applicable to different contexts and challenges faced by individuals and teams in complex healthcare organisations.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2020

Rachel Humphris, Hannah Bradby, Beatriz Padilla, Jenny Phillimore, Simon Pemberton and Silja Samerski

Research has long focused on the notion of access and the trajectory towards a healthcare encounter but has neglected what happens to patients after these initial…

Abstract

Purpose

Research has long focused on the notion of access and the trajectory towards a healthcare encounter but has neglected what happens to patients after these initial encounters. This paper focuses attention on what happens after an initial healthcare encounter leading to a more nuanced understanding of how patients from a diverse range of backgrounds make sense of medical advice, how they mix this knowledge with other forms of information and how they make decisions about what to do next.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on 160 in-depth interviews across four European countries the paper problematizes the notion of access; expands the definition of “decision partners”; and reframes the medical encounter as a journey, where one encounter leads to and informs the next.

Findings

This approach reveals the significant unseen, unrecognised and unacknowledged work that patients undertake to solve their health concerns.

Originality/value

De-centring the professional from the healthcare encounter allows us to understand why patients take particular pathways to care and how resources might be more appropriately leveraged to support both patients and professionals along this journey.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

1 – 10 of 113