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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

L. Randall

Examines the ′perceptual blueprinting technique′, a standardised method used to encourage service quality and effectiveness by identifying the organisation′s service…

Abstract

Examines the ′perceptual blueprinting technique′, a standardised method used to encourage service quality and effectiveness by identifying the organisation′s service delivery system and any failure points it may have. Describes the research method used to generate perceptual blueprinting and provides a case example of its use in hotel services within National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in the United Kingdom.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

Robin Adair Erickson and Michael E. Roloff

The purpose of this research is to focus on organizational support factors that facilitate organizational commitment among downsizing survivors. High attrition by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to focus on organizational support factors that facilitate organizational commitment among downsizing survivors. High attrition by employees who “survive” layoffs is common and costly.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 2,751 employees, a secondary analysis of employee survey data examined the effects of perceived organizational support (POS), perceived supervisor support (PSS), and gender on downsizing survivors' organizational commitment.

Findings

Findings indicate that organizational commitment is positively related to both POS and PSS, with POS accounting for a greater increment of variance. When predicting organizational commitment subsequent to a downsizing, POS and PSS compensate for each other in that: POS moderates the association between PSS and organizational commitment, such that the relationship becomes stronger as the level of POS decreases; and PSS moderates the association between POS and organizational commitment, such that the relationship becomes weaker as the level of PSS increases. Gender moderates the two‐way interaction between POS and PSS when predicting organizational commitment such that the interaction is stronger among men than for women.

Research limitations/implications

The effect sizes associated with the interactions are small and because this was a secondary analysis, we could not use established scales for some constructs. Also, the sample was drawn from one USA organization and may not generalize to other organizational settings.

Practical implications

The items contained in our scales suggest multiple ways that organizations can make their employees feel more supported in terms of both POS and PSS.

Originality/value

This study found a previously unknown interaction among POS and PSS that was moderated by gender.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2020

Liam Fahey

Abstract

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The Insight Discipline: Crafting New Marketplace Understanding that Makes a Difference
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-733-4

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2004

Lara Foley

This chapter is concerned with the varied legitimizing discourses used by midwives to frame their identities in relation to their work. This sociological issue is…

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with the varied legitimizing discourses used by midwives to frame their identities in relation to their work. This sociological issue is particularly important in the context of an occupation, such as this one, that exists at the border of competing service claims. Drawing on 26 in-depth interviews, I use narrative analysis to examine the stories that midwives tell about their work. Through these women’s work narratives, I show the complex intersection of narrative, culture, institution, and biography (Chase, 1995, 2001; DeVault, 1999).

Details

Gendered Perspectives on Reproduction and Sexuality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-088-3

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Morris B. Holbrook

Abstract

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Saša Baškarada and Andy Koronios

Many organizations are seeking unicorn data scientists, that rarest of breeds that can do it all. They are said to be experts in many traditionally distinct disciplines…

Abstract

Purpose

Many organizations are seeking unicorn data scientists, that rarest of breeds that can do it all. They are said to be experts in many traditionally distinct disciplines, including mathematics, statistics, computer science, artificial intelligence, and more. The purpose of this paper is to describe authors’ pursuit of these elusive mythical creatures.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews with managers/directors from nine Australian state and federal government agencies with relatively mature data science functions.

Findings

Although the authors failed to find evidence of unicorn data scientists, they are pleased to report on six key roles that are considered to be required for an effective data science team. Primary and secondary skills for each of the roles are identified and the resulting framework is then used to illustratively evaluate three data science Master-level degrees offered by Australian universities.

Research limitations/implications

Given that the findings presented in this paper have been based on a study with large government agencies with relatively mature data science functions, they may not be directly transferable to less mature, smaller, and less well-resourced agencies and firms.

Originality/value

The skills framework provides a theoretical contribution that may be applied in practice to evaluate and improve the composition of data science teams and related training programs.

Details

Program, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Malin Lindberg, Åsa Wikberg Nilsson, Eugenia Segerstedt, Erik Hidman, Kristina L. Nilsson, Helena Karlberg and Johanna Balogh

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on co-creative approaches for place innovation in an Arctic town, based on the relocation of Kiruna’s city center in northern…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on co-creative approaches for place innovation in an Arctic town, based on the relocation of Kiruna’s city center in northern Sweden. Three cases of co-creative innovation processes in Kiruna are investigated and compared: an R&D project about local perceptions and visions of attractive urban environments; an R&D project about norm-creative design principles for inclusive and attractive urban design; and an R&D project about cross-industrial synergies for city center attractiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The study’s research design encompasses a comparative and participatory approach. The comparative approach implies investigation and comparison of three cases of co-creative innovation processes in Kiruna. The participatory approach implies joint development of new knowledge by researchers and local actors. The data consists of participatory observations of workshops and qualitative interviews with local actors.

Findings

The study reveals that the studied processes have harnessed the city center relocation as an opportunity to make Kiruna more attractive to residents and visitors, by using the co-creative approaches of Living Lab, Now-Wow-How and Norm-creative design. These approaches have enabled experts and local actors to jointly identify excluding patterns and norms in the relocation process and to envision inclusive and attractive (re-)configurations and (re-)conceptualizations of the future Kiruna.

Research limitations/implications

The results add to the academic strand of inclusive urban transformation, by providing insights into co-creative approaches for re-imagining an Arctic town in times of industrial and social change. New insights are provided regarding how the geographical, industrial and cultural identity of an Arctic town can be harnessed to envision new configuration, content and communication that is attractive and accessible for a diversity of residents and visitors.

Practical implications

The results highlight the potential to harness Arctic and rural characteristics in the promotion of urban attractiveness and public well-being, especially when combined with co-creative identification and transformation of excluding norms and patterns.

Originality/value

The results provide new insights into how co-creative approaches may facilitate innovative and inclusive renewal of towns and cities in the Arctic and beyond.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Abstract

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Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-367-9

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2015

Russell Cropanzano, Marion Fortin and Jessica F. Kirk

Justice rules are standards that serve as criteria for formulating fairness judgments. Though justice rules play a role in the organizational justice literature, they have…

Abstract

Justice rules are standards that serve as criteria for formulating fairness judgments. Though justice rules play a role in the organizational justice literature, they have seldom been the subject of analysis in their own right. To address this limitation, we first consider three meta-theoretical dualities that are highlighted by justice rules – the distinction between justice versus fairness, indirect versus direct measurement, and normative versus descriptive paradigms. Second, we review existing justice rules and organize them into four types of justice: distributive (e.g., equity, equality), procedural (e.g., voice, consistent treatment), interpersonal (e.g., politeness, respectfulness), and informational (e.g., candor, timeliness). We also emphasize emergent rules that have not received sufficient research attention. Third, we consider various computation models purporting to explain how justice rules are assessed and aggregated to form fairness judgments. Fourth and last, we conclude by reviewing research that enriches our understanding of justice rules by showing how they are cognitively processed. We observe that there are a number of influences on fairness judgments, and situations exist in which individuals do not systematically consider justice rules.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-016-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1973

Randall L. Schultz

Reviews various methods for handling competition in dynamic market models. Proposes a research strategy which considers the method in relation to quantitative…

Abstract

Reviews various methods for handling competition in dynamic market models. Proposes a research strategy which considers the method in relation to quantitative considerations of market validity and behavioural factors of implementation. Gives a case study where this research strategy is applied.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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