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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Jane Briddon, Clare Baguley and Martin Webber

This paper highlights the social context of common mental disorders in primary care and the paucity of evidence relating to effective social interventions. It introduces…

Abstract

This paper highlights the social context of common mental disorders in primary care and the paucity of evidence relating to effective social interventions. It introduces the ABC‐E Model of Emotion, which combines social interventions with psychological therapy, and discusses how the implementation of the new role of graduate primary care mental health worker (GPCMHW) provides an opportunity for holistic practice in helping individuals experiencing mild to moderate mental health difficulties in primary care. It provides a case example of the implementation of the ABC‐E model and makes recommendations for further research including the evaluation of the model and GPCMHW training programmes.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

L. Mynors‐Wallis, D. Cope and S. Suliman

Clinical governance is at the heart of the drive to improve the quality of patient care in the National Health Service. National targets, the National Service Frameworks…

Abstract

Clinical governance is at the heart of the drive to improve the quality of patient care in the National Health Service. National targets, the National Service Frameworks and NICE Guidance are providing a top‐down mechanism to deliver this improved care. Improved patient care will not happen, however, without the active and enthusiastic participation of clinicians and clinical teams. This article sets out the mechanism that Dorset Healthcare NHS Trust, a specialist mental health and learning disability trust, has established to foster and develop the involvement of clinical teams in clinical governance. The article describes the development of team‐based clinical governance portfolios and sets out how they have been used to focus clinical teams on clinical governance activities.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Nicole M. Marlatt, Elisabeth M. Van Bussel, Dallas Seitz and Iris Gutmanis

The purpose of this paper is to introduce problem-solving therapy (PST) training to an Ontario health region. The aim of this pilot project was to increase psychotherapy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce problem-solving therapy (PST) training to an Ontario health region. The aim of this pilot project was to increase psychotherapy access by training community-based outreach clinicians and to understand their satisfaction with the training program as well as their confidence in applying the principles of PST.

Design/methodology/approach

Clinicians from Southwestern Ontario who provide community-based mental health outreach services to older adults were invited to participate in this training opportunity. Selection was based on their existing client base, the geographic area they served, and self-reported foreseeable PST training benefits. Selected individuals received an eight-hour in-person didactic session, eight one-hour case-based learning opportunities, and individual case supervision. Acquired knowledge, perceived confidence in their skills, level of adherence to PST principles in clinical interactions, and satisfaction with the training program itself were measured.

Findings

Of the 36 applicants, eight trainees were selected. All trainees completed their training and seven were successfully certified in PST. Trainees indicated a high level of satisfaction with the training experience. According to the evaluation tools, trainee confidence in providing PST significantly increased, though there was no statistically significant change in knowledge.

Originality/value

This study provides the first evidence that PST can be introduced within a regional geriatric mental health service in Canada. The training involved both in-person training, web-based conferencing sessions and a supervisory component. The training lasted 16 hours and resulted in staff skill development in an evidence-based psychotherapy modality.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Frankie Pidd and Margaret McArthur

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Rajiv Kumar Singh

The purpose of this paper is to describe a framework for the implementation of clinical governance (CG) within a mental health and addictions service at all functional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a framework for the implementation of clinical governance (CG) within a mental health and addictions service at all functional levels within the system (consumer, clinician, team, service and unit level). It aims to include and enlarge on the functional subdivisions of CG (as practised in the National Health Service (NHS)) by identifying 11 component domains of interest.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper briefly reviews the varying interpretations of the concept of CG in the literature and associated difficulties in its implementation.

Findings

Several authors have pointed out the difficulties in the implementation of CG at the operational level. In particular, CG is often seen as top‐down, “managerial” in its focus rather than providing clinicians at the coal‐face with a device for quality assurance and improvement.

Practical implications

The framework asserts that the 11 component domains are relevant at all levels within a healthcare delivery system; in fact, conversations already occur around these domains at all levels with variable frequency, with a focus that is relevant to that level, determined by the needs at each level.

Originality/value

The paper describes a practical framework for implementation of CG within a mental health and addictions service that addresses some of the criticism levelled against the concept of CG in the literature. This conceptualisation provides a seamless merging of the so‐called managerial and clinical imperatives around clinical governance.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Book part
Publication date: 31 August 2001

Ralph Swindle, Lisa Harris, Kurt Kroenke, Wansu Tu and X. Zhou

This paper examines the promises and pitfalls of integrated models of mental health care in primary care settings, and presents the findings of a successful pilot study of…

Abstract

This paper examines the promises and pitfalls of integrated models of mental health care in primary care settings, and presents the findings of a successful pilot study of integrated care. There are a number of technological breakthroughs which could improve treatment outcomes. However, research indicates improved outcomes are likely only when changes include new practice patterns, patient education, and systematic monitoring of patient process and outcomes. A study in a health maintenance organization is presented based on a staged model of treatment and exemplifying these principles. We conclude that integrated models while technically feasible, are organizationally complex in actual practice.

Details

Investing in Health: The Social and Economic Benefits of Health Care Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-070-8

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Flippa Watkeys and Suzanne Morton

The purpose of this paper is to argue that recent attention has been focused on inpatient services at the expense of community mental health teams and that it is time to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that recent attention has been focused on inpatient services at the expense of community mental health teams and that it is time to redress the balance.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a personal viewpoint.

Findings

In writing this piece it has enabled us to focus on just how widespread the issues are regarding the lack of focus on community services, and that the view and paradigm needs to change on all levels/structures. Services need to recognise the wide scope of community services and the part they inevitably play in someone’s recovery journey. It also throws the spotlight on services working too often in silos deeply affecting people in receipt of the services.

Originality/value

To stimulate debate about the role of community mental health teams.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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