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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Eddie W.L. Cheng, Heng Li, Peter E.D. Love and Zahir Irani

A model for an e‐business infrastructure that can be used to support supply chain activities in construction is proposed. A virtual network structure that acts as a…

Abstract

A model for an e‐business infrastructure that can be used to support supply chain activities in construction is proposed. A virtual network structure that acts as a value‐added component of an e‐business infrastructure is used to improve communication and coordination, and encourage the mutual sharing of inter‐organisational resources and competencies. The e‐business infrastructure used to support the proposed network structure and the human, organisational and cultural barriers that may be encountered are presented and discussed. It is proffered that the proposed e‐business model not only will be of benefit to those organisations which operate in the construction supply chain, but also may be fit for other types of business‐to‐business e‐commerce when cooperation between business partners is necessary to improve organisational performance and gain a competitive advantage

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Cristóbal Sánchez‐Rodríguez, David Hemsworth and Ángel R. Martínez‐Lorente

Supply chain management is an increasingly important organizational concern, and proper management of supplier relationships constitutes one essential element of supply…

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain management is an increasingly important organizational concern, and proper management of supplier relationships constitutes one essential element of supply chain success. However, there is little empirical research that has tested the effect of supplier development on performance. The main objective is to analyze the effect of supplier development practices with different levels of implementation complexity on the firm's purchasing performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Three supplier development constructs were defined: basic supplier development, moderate supplier development, and advanced supplier development. Three structural models were hypothesized and tested using structural equation modeling through field research on a sample of 306 manufacturing companies in Spain.

Findings

Identified important interrelationships among the various supplier development practices, basic, moderate, and advanced. Also indicated that the implementation of supplier development practices significantly contributes to the prediction of purchasing performance.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a single key informant could be seen as a potential limitation of the study. The study was a cross‐sectional and descriptive sample of the manufacturing industry at a given point in time. A more stringent test of the relationships between the different levels of supplier development and performance requires a longitudinal study, or field experiment.

Practical implications

This study focused on supplier development practices and revealed how involving suppliers in supplier development activities is important and may help buyers to increase their purchasing performance. The findings from the structural analysis should provide practicing managers with insights on how these practices and their benefits are related in terms of purchasing performance, thus affecting their ability to make better sourcing decisions.

Originality/value

Fills an important gap in the purchasing literature with respect to the area of supplier development. While there is much written about supplier development based on conceptual and case study research, this study is unique in that it is the first attempt to empirically model the relationships between different levels of supplier development and their impact on purchasing performance using a comprehensive set of practices.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 21 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2005

Chu‐hua Kuei Ph D., Christian N. Madu Ph D., Wing S. Chow, D. Ph and Min H. Lu

There exists an association between Supply Chain Quality Management(SCQM) and supply chain competence. To verify such claims, data wascollected from Hong Kong based firms…

Abstract

There exists an association between Supply Chain Quality Management (SCQM) and supply chain competence. To verify such claims, data was collected from Hong Kong based firms. The data showed in most cases an association could be established between SCQM initiatives and the supply chain competence. Some fi rms with SCQM initiatives tend to perform better in terms of customer service or product quality. Supply chains managers may therefore, perform better when their managerial foci are consistent with recognized dimensions of supply chain quality and excellence. In today’s global economy supply chain management is crucial in achieving organizational effectiveness.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Mary Anderson and Amrik S. Sohal

A considerable amount of resources are being deployed by organisations of all sizes and types towards implementing Total Quality Management and other improvement…

Abstract

A considerable amount of resources are being deployed by organisations of all sizes and types towards implementing Total Quality Management and other improvement strategies. However, little is known about the impact these practices are having on organisational performance, particularly for small‐ and medium‐sized businesses. This paper examines the relationship between quality management practices and performance in small businesses. Over the past decade a number of empirical studies has been conducted that examine the link between quality management practices and organisational performance; however, most of these have focused on larger organisations. This study uses data collected from 62 small business in Australia and uses the Australian Quality Awards framework to determine the link between quality management practices and business performance.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 16 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Elmar Holschbach

The aim of this paper is to investigate to what extent buying companies use quality management (QM) practices for their externally sourced business services (BS) and if…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate to what extent buying companies use quality management (QM) practices for their externally sourced business services (BS) and if differences between manufacturing and service as well as between large and small companies exist regarding their usage and effects.

Design/methodology/approach

The researcher collected data from a total of 252 companies using an online survey. Significant differences in the data were identified using the Mann‐Whitney‐U test.

Findings

The results show that significant differences exist in the adoption of QM practices for services and their effects on performance between manufacturing and service as well as large and small companies. Only minor differences could be detected, however, regarding barriers to QM implementation and its determinants.

Research limitations/implications

The findings cast doubt on the notion of universal applicability of QM and suggest taking contextual factors into account when examining QM.

Practical implications

The study indicates that QM for externally sourced BSs can have positive effects on the performance of the buying company. In contrast to QM for goods, manufacturers can learn from service providers in order to improve their QM for services.

Originality/value

This study fills a theoretical gap as previous literature has predominantly adopted the perspective of a goods or service provider and did not specifically address quality management for externally sourced services. The findings provide more insights into how manufacturing, service, large and small companies implement QM for externally purchased services. The results imply that the implementation of QM for these services without adjusting to contingent factors is fraught with risk.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Yusoon Kim, Thomas Y. Choi and Paul F. Skilton

The purpose of this paper is to describe different ways in which a buyer and supplier can be embedded in a dyadic relationship and how these differences influence patterns…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe different ways in which a buyer and supplier can be embedded in a dyadic relationship and how these differences influence patterns of inter-firm innovation activities and outcomes. Specifically, to address the relative paucity of theoretical work on how dyadic configurations influence parties’ joint innovation behavior, this study examines how different buyer-supplier embeddedness (BSE) configurations change the four choices that pertain to the levels of involvement buyers and suppliers exhibit in inter-firm innovation activities. These choices concern the processes buyers use to engage suppliers; the scope of efforts in each party; the locus of effects determining the beneficiaries; and the extent to which parties disclose private innovations within the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on social embeddedness literature, the authors conceptualize dyad level, BSE in two dimensions: relational and structural. The relational dimension describes the quality of relationship, while the structural dimension describes the intensity of exchanges between the parties. Together these dimensions allow the authors to map the differences in BSE configurations and provide a basis for exploring their links to inter-firm innovation patterns.

Findings

The authors demonstrate the configurational approach to the innovation patterns in inter-organizational setting. That is, the authors conclude that different configurations of BSE are likely to produce distinctive patterns of choices for inter-firm innovation activities.

Originality/value

This study applies social embeddedness perspective to conceptualize dyadic BSE. Adoption of this concept allows dimensionalizing the dyadic relationships into two distinct dyadic elements, relational, and structural dimensions. Also, the concept has rich implications for how partner firms interact and share information. The dyad’s innovation potential and patterns are considered based on the configurations of dyadic embeddedness.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Arthur Seakhoa-King, Marcjanna M Augustyn and Peter Mason

Abstract

Details

Tourism Destination Quality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Tero Lehtonen

The aim of this study is to identify success factors of collaborative relationships and the attributes that distinguish collaborative relationships from arm's‐length…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to identify success factors of collaborative relationships and the attributes that distinguish collaborative relationships from arm's‐length relationships in facility services. Additionally, in order to understand why companies are moving towards the more collaborative approach in managing relations with their facility service providers, the underlying problems in earlier practices are analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is qualitative, based on semi‐structured and focus group interviews. Representatives from both client and service provider companies were interviewed.

Findings

Collaborative relationships in the facility services context are by nature similar to those in other areas of supply chain management. The prerequisite for the successful establishment of a collaborative relationship is that both parties have a particular readiness for it. This includes both capability for co‐operation and a collaborative mindset. Instead of self‐seeking behavior and short‐term contracts, mutual trust, commitment, openness, the involvement of different organizational levels, continuous development, and the promise of mutual benefits are needed. In the long run, relationship success is guaranteed by co‐operation, two‐way information sharing and goal congruence. In addition to the business perspective, relationship success includes the end‐user perspective. Earlier practices have suffered from poor communication, shortcomings in service management and lack of development activity.

Originality/value

As well as contributing to the current body of knowledge on inter‐organizational relationships, this study offers potential benefits to both facility service providers and buyers in terms of describing how to formulate successful relationships and to improve the performance and efficiency of collaborative relations.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

M. Tawfik Mady, Tarek T. Mady and Sarah T. Mady

The purpose of this study is to report and contrast manufacturer–supplier relationships, supplier selection and procurement performance of two manufacturing sectors in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to report and contrast manufacturer–supplier relationships, supplier selection and procurement performance of two manufacturing sectors in Kuwait. The effect of supplier relationship and selection on the performance of the procurement function was also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys of supplier selection, supplier relationship and procurement performance are taken from 62 plants operating in 2 competitive manufacturing sectors in Kuwait (foods industry and refractors industry). The study utilizes multivariate and multi-regression analyses in understanding the effect of supplier relationship and selection on the performance of the procurement function.

Findings

Findings indicate a significant effect of supplier relationship and supplier selection on a plant’s procurement performance. However, variance in plant size and/or industrial sector was found to not affect this relationship.

Originality/value

Despite the significance of the Gulf states and the growing importance of the manufacturing sector in these countries, relatively little is known about how buyers and suppliers within this sector interact. This study is the first to document supplier relationships and selection processes in this area of the world. The study also provides a reliable and valid scale for measuring the performance of the procurement function in the Kuwaiti manufacturing sector. Furthermore, the postulated impact of supplier–buyer relationships on the performance of the procurement functions was investigated in a newly emerging economy in the Gulf.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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