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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

L. David Weller, Carvin L. Brown and Kohlan J. Flynn

The study investigated popular election results regarding therelationship between the variables of county board member defeat orre‐election and the reappointment or…

Abstract

The study investigated popular election results regarding the relationship between the variables of county board member defeat or re‐election and the reappointment or dismissal of county school superintendents, in the state of North Carolina, within a one, two, three or four year time frame. All 100 county school districts were studied over a 12‐year period of time in which an ex post facto quasi‐experimental research design was used to determine the relationship between incumbent board member defeat and superintendent turnover following six general elections. Results of the study show there was stability in both superintendent reappointment and incumbent school board member re‐election. These findings do not support previous research regarding the dissatisfaction theory in that previous studies found significant differences between superintendent turnover and incumbent school board member defeat. This study, unlike others, focused on county public superintendent turnover and county board member election results as opposed to city or state superintendent and school board member elections.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

L. David Weller

Deming’s quality managment principles (TQM) are widely used as a school restructuring vehicle and produce increases in student achievement and self‐esteem and increased…

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4225

Abstract

Deming’s quality managment principles (TQM) are widely used as a school restructuring vehicle and produce increases in student achievement and self‐esteem and increased teacher morale and self‐confidence. Application of Deming’s principles and the TQM problem‐solving tools and techniques can be used to solve noninstructional problems of schooling. These areas, which create unnecessary costs to the school and community, include vandalism, school dropouts and student absenteeism. This case study presents a model for principals to apply to provide quality outcomes, at reduced cost, in noninstructional areas. Using teachers, parents, community members, and applying the problem‐solving tools and techniques of TQM to identify root problem causes, principals can identify realistic solutions which yield positive results and reduce costs in academic and nonacademic areas.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

L. David Weller

Successful school reform requires a paradigm shift which begins with unlocking the school’s existing culture before attempts are made to integrate reform variables…

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1002

Abstract

Successful school reform requires a paradigm shift which begins with unlocking the school’s existing culture before attempts are made to integrate reform variables. Reengineering, and rethinking and radical redesign of internal processes calls for discarding current practices and reinventing better ways to supply products and services. Holistic thinking, cross‐sectional configurations, proactive behaviour patterns, reward for innovation and creativity, and the demise of traditional infrastructures are essential for facilitating fluid social, economic and political trends into the 21st century. Educators must think differently about the purpose of schools and their delivery and redesign infrastructures which are built on shared values and beliefs, multiple interacting linkages and teamwork. School leaders are the catalysts for change and, working with the school’s power agents and modeling expected behaviours, motivate teachers to replace the old culture with new processes of schooling. Shared ownership of case values, realistic and achievable goals and collaboration places the responsibility for creating a reengineered delivery system on teachers themselves.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

L. David Weller

Examines an alternative to downsizing in the restructuring oforganizations. Suggests that the restructuring and downsizing of staffoften result from economic inefficiency…

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950

Abstract

Examines an alternative to downsizing in the restructuring of organizations. Suggests that the restructuring and downsizing of staff often result from economic inefficiency. They are used to make immediate financial savings and to keep floundering organizations solvent. Such practices seldom produce sustained results. New financial difficulties soon arise because the root of the problem is not addressed – poor management practices.

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The TQM Magazine, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

L. David Weller

Argues that the quest for quality is international in scope, with many nations adopting the total quality management (TQM) principles as a way of achieving educational…

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1578

Abstract

Argues that the quest for quality is international in scope, with many nations adopting the total quality management (TQM) principles as a way of achieving educational reform. Early indicators of TQM’s success are increases in student achievement, student self‐concept and teacher morale. However, quality programmes are not free and the concept of accountability is ever‐present in the minds of stakeholders who demand positive returns on their investments. Without a means to demonstrate successful returns on quality investments, public support and confidence in the schools may drastically decrease and TQM may be perceived as too expensive for public support. For those implementing TQM, the question is: how do I demonstrate the return on quality investments? The answer lies in measurement. This involves assessing customer need and expectations; producing quality outputs which meet or exceed customer satisfaction, and then documenting these returns by directly linking quality education outputs with the inputs of time, money, and effort.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

L. David Weller

Utilizes benchmarking as an effective and efficient way to manage the change process for quality transformation in schools. Originally conceptualized as competitive…

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1285

Abstract

Utilizes benchmarking as an effective and efficient way to manage the change process for quality transformation in schools. Originally conceptualized as competitive intelligence gathering, benchmarking can also be a vehicle for planned, orderly change. Discusses the practices of generic and strategic benchmarking with the importance of personalizing the change processes through matching teacher knowledge, skills and interests to their benchmarking assignments. Presents reasons as to why teachers resist change in general, and presents an adoption model which uses some of the TQM tools and techniques to facilitate whole‐school implementation of the quality principles.

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The TQM Magazine, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

L. David Weller

Equitable practices of fair and just treatment are vital inpromoting quality education and permeate Deming′s 14 points of qualitymanagement. When inequitable practices…

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1815

Abstract

Equitable practices of fair and just treatment are vital in promoting quality education and permeate Deming′s 14 points of quality management. When inequitable practices exist, they have a negative impact on worker motivation, quality of work performance and job satisfaction. Inequitable practices can be both overt and covert with lose‐lose confrontations resulting for both worker and administrator. Hidden inequities violate the sense of fair and just treatment which is deeply embedded in our culture. Administrator actions which run counter to the concept of fairness and justice cause worker discontent and detract from quality workmanship. Fusing together the tenets of equity theory and Deming′s 14 points, administrators can provide equal ratios of inputs to outcomes in the workplace, increase worker morale, and provide fair and equitable treatment.

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Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

L. David Weller and Sylvia A. Hartley

Educational reform has been called for over the past several decadeswith answers resulting in fragmented programmes and mixed researchfindings. Reluctance and unfulfilled…

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782

Abstract

Educational reform has been called for over the past several decades with answers resulting in fragmented programmes and mixed research findings. Reluctance and unfulfilled promises of post‐reform movements have caused dismay and scepticism among educators and community members alike. These concerns too often take the place of objective analysis and cause educators to be overly cautious about newly promised panaceas. TQM will meet these concerns and objections, but this systematic, structural management process may be the key to the reform movement afoot. Presents many of the common concerns about a business model being applied to education as a way to achieve quality. Answers provided to these concerns are rational and have proved effective in education today, but are not typically viewed in a business perspective. TQM can and will work if objectives are put in educational terms.

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The TQM Magazine, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

L. David Weller

Multiple intelligences theory contends that there are multiple “intelligences”, at least seven types of human capacities and abilities, which exist and can be found in…

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2525

Abstract

Multiple intelligences theory contends that there are multiple “intelligences”, at least seven types of human capacities and abilities, which exist and can be found in each individual in varying degrees. This theory has made a major impact in the educational field, but it also has applications for other types of quality organizations. Businesses can use multiple intelligences theory to structure workshops and training sessions for employees which will enhance teamwork, develop human potential, and foster creativity.

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Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

L. David Weller

Reforming and restructuring education through Deming’s 14 pointshave proved successful in yielding quality outcomes. However, many newlyproposed programmes take the…

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486

Abstract

Reforming and restructuring education through Deming’s 14 points have proved successful in yielding quality outcomes. However, many newly proposed programmes take the traditional, unimaginative approach to implementation – orientation sessions and workshops. These approaches often promote failure before programmes are implemented. This successful, practical approach to quality implementation lacks fanfare but creates wide interest in TQM. In a grass‐roots approach, principals begin slowly to create interest in quality by providing readings, chairing discussion groups, and identifying interested teachers to solve classroom problems using the TQM process. Capitalizing on self‐interest and success, quality teams form, support networks develop and successful outcomes spread as more and more teachers gradually embrace the quality principles.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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