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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Kyung-Tae Kim, Jung Seung Lee and Su-Yol Lee

This study aims to examine the effects of contractual fairness and power sources on the relationship between the buyer and supplier on the innovation performance of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effects of contractual fairness and power sources on the relationship between the buyer and supplier on the innovation performance of the supplier. The mediating role of social capital accumulation between fairness, power and innovation performance was empirically explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were developed to investigate the relationships between supply chain fairness, power sources, social capital and innovation performance. Using structural equation modeling, the hypotheses were tested on data of 209 responses collected from supplying firms in South Korea.

Findings

This study finds that supply chain contractual fairness and referent power use contribute to the innovation performance of the supplier through social capital accumulation between the buyer and supplier. Coercive power, in contrast, impedes the performance improvement of the supplier.

Originality/value

This study provides supply chain practitioners, academics and policy-makers with guidance on how to facilitate and enhance innovation capabilities and performance across the supply chain. By applying social capital theory, this study also provides theoretical underpinning of the literature on supply chain fairness, power and innovation.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 24 November 2020

Sang Il Kim and Kyung Tae Kim

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) index represents attributes of firms that are differentiated. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impacts of…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) index represents attributes of firms that are differentiated. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impacts of differentiated CSR, CSRS (strategic CSR activities) and CSRD (defensive CSR activities) on R&D expenditure and its effectiveness on firm values.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample includes 1,388 firm-year observations for 2004–2015 of listed firms on the Korean Stock Exchange (KSE) whose CSR measures, KEJI (Korea Economic Justice Institute) index are available from the Citizens' Coalition for Economic Justice (2016).

Findings

The results show that while CSRS is positively associated with R&D expenditure, CSRD is not. Further, development costs and its interaction term with CSRS positively affect firm values.

Originality/value

This study provides an important reason to separate the attributes of the CSR in future empirical studies. The results imply that the study of effects of CSR on sustainable growth or firm values should focus on CSRS rather than CSR activities in general in future research.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2011

Kyung‐Tae Kim, Seung‐Kyu Rhee and Joongsan Oh

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the strategic role evolution of client‐following local subsidiaries of foreign automotive parts suppliers in China.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the strategic role evolution of client‐following local subsidiaries of foreign automotive parts suppliers in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The units of analysis are five local subsidiaries of foreign automotive parts suppliers dealing with Beijing Hyundai Motor Corporation in China; a case study methodology based on interviews with managers of the subsidiaries was employed.

Findings

First, a modified version of Ferdows's model can be utilized to aptly analyze the strategic role changes of subsidiaries of foreign automotive parts suppliers which have followed their major client into the emerging market. Second, the development of a subsidiary's functional capabilities varies from subsidiary to subsidiary, depending on the headquarters' (HQ) global strategy and the nature of its interactions with external players. Third, the strategic role evolution of a subsidiary is critically influenced by the levels of its functional capabilities. Finally, the mechanism for a subsidiary's strategic role evolution can be explained by the interactions of three critical factors: the task assigned by HQ, the subsidiary's choice, and the local environment.

Research limitations/implications

The external validity of this case study is yet to be verified and the possible gaps in perceptions between the subsidiary and the HQ have not yet been addressed. This is the first case study to address the strategic role evolution of client‐following subsidiaries of automotive parts suppliers.

Practical implications

This study presents the HQ with a framework for role assignments and a checklist for planning the development of a subsidiary's capabilities.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to investigate the strategic role evolution of local subsidiaries of foreign automotive parts suppliers in the emerging market, and it finds critical factors affecting capability development, which in turn shape the subsidiary's process of role evolution.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Bradley Tatar

South Koreans in the city of Ulsan claim that eating whale meat is a tradition, but what is the role of SMOs in making whaling into a tradition identified with a local…

Abstract

South Koreans in the city of Ulsan claim that eating whale meat is a tradition, but what is the role of SMOs in making whaling into a tradition identified with a local identity? In following account of a confrontation that took place in Korea between anti-whaling protesters from Greenpeace and local defenders of whaling, it is shown that tradition is not an inevitable outcome of conserving the past; instead, it is an outcome of mobilization, framing, and choices made by movement participants. Tradition in the whaling town of Ulsan was formed through the encounter between opposed social movements, prompting strategic choices of counterframing, frame bridging, and the dissonance between framing and feeling rules. Through the encounters with transnational activists, the Korean defenders of whaling refashioned themselves as rooted cosmopolitans, utilizing global norms to justify local practices in the name of heritage and tradition.

Details

Power and Protest
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-834-5

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2017

Richard Lee, Kyung Tae Lee and Jianyao Li

This study contends that consumer ethnocentrism and animosity rest on semantic and episodic memory, respectively. It further examines how the influence of consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

This study contends that consumer ethnocentrism and animosity rest on semantic and episodic memory, respectively. It further examines how the influence of consumer ethnocentrism and animosity on consumer boycott behaviour may vary over time and use the memory theory to explain these temporal differences.

Design/methodology/approach

Part 1 involved an experiment to demonstrate the relationship between consumer ethnocentrism/animosity and semantic/episodic memory. To determine the temporal characteristics of consumer ethnocentrism and animosity, Part 2 involved two quantitative surveys (one each in China and Japan), followed by another two surveys six months later.

Findings

Part 1 showed that consumer ethnocentrism and animosity were underpinned by semantic and episodic memory, respectively. Consistent with memory theory, Part 2 found that consumer ethnocentrism was temporally more stable than animosity. Consumer animosity influenced boycott behaviour during but not after the dispute, whereas consumer ethnocentrism influenced boycott behaviour during as well as the dispute. Finally, consumer ethnocentrism was antecedent to consumer animosity, siding with the relationship between semantic and episodic memory.

Research limitations/implications

Limited to two countries, both with collectivistic culture. A longitudinal approach over multiple phases would further enhance the robustness of the findings.

Practical implications

Understanding the psychological underpinning of consumer ethnocentrism and animosity would allow firms to develop effective marketing strategies to appeal to consumers’ ethnocentric and animosity dispositions.

Originality/value

The first study to examine the psychological underpinnings of consumer ethnocentrism and animosity by drawing on the memory theory.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2019

Tae Kyung Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner

The purpose of this paper is to focus on exploring the link between managers’ mindset (fixed vs growth) and their choice of leadership behaviors.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on exploring the link between managers’ mindset (fixed vs growth) and their choice of leadership behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample was drawn from a proprietary database provided by a global organization that offers 360-degree online leadership surveys. Individuals in management positions provided an assessment of their mindset orientation as well as how often they engaged in various leadership behaviors.

Findings

Growth-minded managers consistently displayed more frequent use of leadership behaviors than did their fixed mindset counterparts; and this relationship was independent of demographic or organizational factors.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are consistent with previous mindset research but prominently extend those results to managers in corporate settings; and supports previous research regarding the limited influence of demographic and organizational factors on both mindset and leadership.

Practical implications

Managers’ mindsets influence how much they engage in various leadership behaviors, and improving leadership competencies is more likely to occur when managers hold a growth mindset that abilities can be developed through effort as compared to fixed mindset managers who believe that abilities are inherent and unchangeable. The mindset of managers is predictive of the behavioral choices they make about exercising leadership, and has practical significance since studies have shown that managers are generally more effective in direct relationship to how often they are seen as engaging in leadership.

Originality/value

This study extends the significance of mindset from the educational to the corporate environment, using a robust sample of managers, and finding that the relationship between mindset and leadership is independent of various demographic and organizational characteristics.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Richard Lee and Kyung Tae Lee

Consumer animosity is often used to explain consumers' boycott of products from a foreign country in a dispute. However, these studies are mainly cross‐sectional. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumer animosity is often used to explain consumers' boycott of products from a foreign country in a dispute. However, these studies are mainly cross‐sectional. The purpose of this paper is to investigate temporal changes in two distinct consumer‐animosity dimensions – i.e. historical and contemporary – and their influences on judgment of and willingness‐to‐buy foreign products.

Design/methodology/approach

Sampling came from a mall‐intercept survey in Japan during the height of a recent Japan‐China dispute (n=139), followed by a similar survey six months later (n=157). Identical questionnaires tapped Japanese consumers' historical animosity (HA), contemporary animosity (CA) and ethnocentrism dispositions, and judgment of and willingness to buy Chinese products. The data were fitted using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results indicate that both CA and HA lowered willingness to buy Chinese products during, but not after, the dispute. CA was consistently stronger than HA in influencing willingness to buy. By contrast, product judgment did not influence willingness to buy during the dispute. That is, animosity dispositions overshadowed objective product evaluation during the dispute. After the dispute, only product judgment directly influenced willingness to buy, and HA indirectly influenced willingness to buy via product judgment. CA weakened after the dispute, but HA remained stable over time. Product judgment was lower during the dispute. Consumer ethnocentrism interacted only with CA during but not after the dispute.

Practical implications

International dispute heightens the salience of present‐day issues such as unemployment rather than of historical conflicts. Although product judgment was affected, the downside to foreign firms is temporary. Domestic firms can only take short‐term advantage, but long‐term edge remains improving product judgment.

Originality/value

Despite extensive research into the influence of consumer animosity on consumer behaviour, surprisingly little research has attempted to investigate the temporal characteristics of the consumer animosity, let alone investigate its distinct dimensions. In this study, the authors attempt to show that unless one considers the potential temporal changes to individual consumer‐animosity dimensions, sweeping conclusions from single‐shot studies may yield an incomplete picture and even misguide managerial initiatives.

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Minyoung Noh, Doocheol Moon and Laura Parte

This paper aims to provide evidence of an unintended observable consequence of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) adoption by examining opportunistic use…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide evidence of an unintended observable consequence of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) adoption by examining opportunistic use of earnings management through revenue as well as expense items classification shifting in the year of transition.

Design/methodology/approach

To document classification shifting, the authors take advantage of the Korean mandatory IFRS adoption in 2011, when broad discretion was given to publicly traded companies’ managers to present operating profits.

Findings

It is found that companies strategically use both revenues and expenses to manage core earnings at the time of transition by shifting other income as a common tactic to improve their operating performance and special expenses just to meet or beat earnings targets.

Originality/value

Given the concerns of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) about classification shifting behavior and the debate over whether the SEC should mandate the use of IFRS for US companies, the findings of this study are timely and contribute to authors’ understanding of the unintended consequences of mandatory IFRS adoption.

Details

International Journal of Accounting & Information Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1834-7649

Keywords

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