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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2017

Richard Lee, Kyung Tae Lee and Jianyao Li

This study contends that consumer ethnocentrism and animosity rest on semantic and episodic memory, respectively. It further examines how the influence of consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

This study contends that consumer ethnocentrism and animosity rest on semantic and episodic memory, respectively. It further examines how the influence of consumer ethnocentrism and animosity on consumer boycott behaviour may vary over time and use the memory theory to explain these temporal differences.

Design/methodology/approach

Part 1 involved an experiment to demonstrate the relationship between consumer ethnocentrism/animosity and semantic/episodic memory. To determine the temporal characteristics of consumer ethnocentrism and animosity, Part 2 involved two quantitative surveys (one each in China and Japan), followed by another two surveys six months later.

Findings

Part 1 showed that consumer ethnocentrism and animosity were underpinned by semantic and episodic memory, respectively. Consistent with memory theory, Part 2 found that consumer ethnocentrism was temporally more stable than animosity. Consumer animosity influenced boycott behaviour during but not after the dispute, whereas consumer ethnocentrism influenced boycott behaviour during as well as the dispute. Finally, consumer ethnocentrism was antecedent to consumer animosity, siding with the relationship between semantic and episodic memory.

Research limitations/implications

Limited to two countries, both with collectivistic culture. A longitudinal approach over multiple phases would further enhance the robustness of the findings.

Practical implications

Understanding the psychological underpinning of consumer ethnocentrism and animosity would allow firms to develop effective marketing strategies to appeal to consumers’ ethnocentric and animosity dispositions.

Originality/value

The first study to examine the psychological underpinnings of consumer ethnocentrism and animosity by drawing on the memory theory.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Kyung Tae Lee, You-Il Lee and Richard Lee

The purpose of this study is to investigate the differential influences of economic nationalism (EN) and cosmopolitanism (COS) on consumer behaviour, and how the two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the differential influences of economic nationalism (EN) and cosmopolitanism (COS) on consumer behaviour, and how the two concepts are underpinned by different (normative versus informational) interpersonal influences.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys took place in two countries, South Korea (n = 257) and Taiwan (n = 258). Both are rapidly developing economies with a cosmopolitan consumer base. Two products, one representing conspicuous and one representing non-conspicuous categories, were used in each country’s survey. The data were subjected to exploratory and confirmation factor analyses and fitted using structural equation modelling.

Findings

Contrary to past studies, EN and COS were unrelated. Economic nationalism was strong and biased towards domestic products. The results also suggest that COS may be related to bias against domestic products. EN related strongly to normative influence, whereas COS rested on informational influence. The results were similar across the countries and the product types.

Research limitations/implications

Economic nationalism and COS may coexist as consumer dispositions and their relative salience may vary across individuals. Foreign firms should not overlook consumers’ nationalistic sentiment, just as domestic firms may capitalise on it. Both foreign and domestic firms can capitalise on consumer nationalism by highlighting benefits such as domestic employment and wealth creation.

Practical implications

EN and COS may coexist as consumer dispositions, and their relative salience may vary across individuals. When managing their brand portfolio, foreign firms would benefit from considering consumers’ nationalistic sentiment, just as domestic firms may capitalise on it. Both foreign and domestic firms can capitalise on consumer nationalism by highlighting social benefits such as domestic employment and wealth creation.

Originality/value

This study brings research on EN and COS from a macro/country level to a micro/individual level. It provides theoretical and empirical insights on the differential influences of EN and COS on consumer behaviour and sheds light on their psychological underpinnings.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Sugjoon Yoon, Ji‐young Kong, Kyungtae Lee and Ho‐yeon Hwang

Optimal switching angles are investigated for minimizing accumulated numerical errors when the dual‐Euler method is used in the simulation of angular rotation.

Abstract

Purpose

Optimal switching angles are investigated for minimizing accumulated numerical errors when the dual‐Euler method is used in the simulation of angular rotation.

Design/methodology/approach

First, round‐off errors are theoretically modeled with a simplified mathematical representation of rotation. Round‐off errors take critical roles in the vicinity of indefinite points because they cause major numerical inaccuracy in very large numerical values represented with limited binary numbers. Optimal switching angles of (±π/4, ±3π/4) are derived and numerically examined. With a more practical and severe rotational model, the switching angles are numerically tested.

Findings

In conclusion, switching pitch angles of (±π/4, ±3π/4) yield near minimum numerical errors in angular parameters of pitch, yaw, and roll if truncation errors are not dominant by using high‐order integration algorithms and small step sizes. It is also noticed that accumulated numerical errors increase dramatically if pitch and roll angles are switched beyond the optimal angles with a little margin.

Originality/value

Optimal switching angles in the dual‐Euler method are identified based on the truncation error analysis. The mechanism of accumulated numerical errors in the dual‐Euler method, which depends on switching angles, is also revealed.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Richard Lee and Kyung Tae Lee

Consumer animosity is often used to explain consumers' boycott of products from a foreign country in a dispute. However, these studies are mainly cross‐sectional. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumer animosity is often used to explain consumers' boycott of products from a foreign country in a dispute. However, these studies are mainly cross‐sectional. The purpose of this paper is to investigate temporal changes in two distinct consumer‐animosity dimensions – i.e. historical and contemporary – and their influences on judgment of and willingness‐to‐buy foreign products.

Design/methodology/approach

Sampling came from a mall‐intercept survey in Japan during the height of a recent Japan‐China dispute (n=139), followed by a similar survey six months later (n=157). Identical questionnaires tapped Japanese consumers' historical animosity (HA), contemporary animosity (CA) and ethnocentrism dispositions, and judgment of and willingness to buy Chinese products. The data were fitted using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results indicate that both CA and HA lowered willingness to buy Chinese products during, but not after, the dispute. CA was consistently stronger than HA in influencing willingness to buy. By contrast, product judgment did not influence willingness to buy during the dispute. That is, animosity dispositions overshadowed objective product evaluation during the dispute. After the dispute, only product judgment directly influenced willingness to buy, and HA indirectly influenced willingness to buy via product judgment. CA weakened after the dispute, but HA remained stable over time. Product judgment was lower during the dispute. Consumer ethnocentrism interacted only with CA during but not after the dispute.

Practical implications

International dispute heightens the salience of present‐day issues such as unemployment rather than of historical conflicts. Although product judgment was affected, the downside to foreign firms is temporary. Domestic firms can only take short‐term advantage, but long‐term edge remains improving product judgment.

Originality/value

Despite extensive research into the influence of consumer animosity on consumer behaviour, surprisingly little research has attempted to investigate the temporal characteristics of the consumer animosity, let alone investigate its distinct dimensions. In this study, the authors attempt to show that unless one considers the potential temporal changes to individual consumer‐animosity dimensions, sweeping conclusions from single‐shot studies may yield an incomplete picture and even misguide managerial initiatives.

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Kyung-Tae Kim, Jung Seung Lee and Su-Yol Lee

This study aims to examine the effects of contractual fairness and power sources on the relationship between the buyer and supplier on the innovation performance of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effects of contractual fairness and power sources on the relationship between the buyer and supplier on the innovation performance of the supplier. The mediating role of social capital accumulation between fairness, power and innovation performance was empirically explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were developed to investigate the relationships between supply chain fairness, power sources, social capital and innovation performance. Using structural equation modeling, the hypotheses were tested on data of 209 responses collected from supplying firms in South Korea.

Findings

This study finds that supply chain contractual fairness and referent power use contribute to the innovation performance of the supplier through social capital accumulation between the buyer and supplier. Coercive power, in contrast, impedes the performance improvement of the supplier.

Originality/value

This study provides supply chain practitioners, academics and policy-makers with guidance on how to facilitate and enhance innovation capabilities and performance across the supply chain. By applying social capital theory, this study also provides theoretical underpinning of the literature on supply chain fairness, power and innovation.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Soo Kyung Park, Kyu Tae Kwak and Bong Gyou Lee

In a sharing economy, economically inactive members can serve as providers owing to the low start-up costs. However, such providers may operate without sufficient…

Abstract

Purpose

In a sharing economy, economically inactive members can serve as providers owing to the low start-up costs. However, such providers may operate without sufficient knowledge of the market and policies, causing significant problems. To prevent illegal sharing, governments encourage providers to register their businesses after meeting certain requirements, but most providers still operate unregistered businesses. The purpose of this paper is to explore the causes of policy non-compliance and suggest measures that can induce compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the rational choice and deterrence theories, this study combines qualitative and quantitative research. The former is used to investigate the antecedent factors affecting compliance. Using the latter, this study assumes that the existence of platform operators can resolve information asymmetries. The qualitative findings provide the variables that can lead to policy compliance, while the quantitative research verifies the causal relationships.

Findings

Business registration by providers in the sharing economy arises from their subjective cost-benefit calculations of policy compliance. According to the qualitative research, they believe there is a low risk of detection of policy non-compliance by the government. The quantitative research suggests that interventions by platform operators could resolve information asymmetries between the government and providers.

Originality/value

This study designed a mechanism to guide providers toward policy compliance. To reduce friction with the existing market and ensure efficient growth, it is necessary to cooperate with sharing economy participants. The results suggest that the role of platform operators and the government is important.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Won-Hyuk Lee, Tae-Wook Na, Kyung-Woo Yi, Seung-Min Yang, Jang-Won Kang, Hyung Giun Kim and Hyung-Ki Park

When a pure titanium component is fabricated in a selective laser melting (SLM) process using titanium powder, the oxygen concentration of the SLM sample increases…

Abstract

Purpose

When a pure titanium component is fabricated in a selective laser melting (SLM) process using titanium powder, the oxygen concentration of the SLM sample increases compared to the initial powder. The purpose of this paper is to study the reason for increasing oxygen concentration after SLM.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand this phenomenon, the authors analyzed the oxidation behavior during the SLM process thermodynamically.

Findings

Based on the laser parameters used in this study, the temperature of the Ti melt during the SLM process was expected to rise to 2,150°C. Based on the thermodynamic analysis, the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure for oxidation was 2.32 × 10−19 atm at 2,150°C when the dissolved oxygen concentration in the titanium is 0.2 wt.%. However, the oxygen partial pressure inside the SLM chamber was 1 × 10−3 atm, which is much higher than the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, oxidation occurred during the SLM process, and the oxygen concentration of the SLM sample increased compared to the initial powder.

Originality/value

Most studies on fabricating Ti components using additive manufacturing (AM) have been focused on how the changes in the microstructures and mechanical properties depend on the process parameters. However, there are a few studies that analyzed the oxygen concentration change of Ti during the AM process and its causes. In this study, the authors analyzed the oxidation behavior during the SLM process thermodynamically.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Bradley Tatar

South Koreans in the city of Ulsan claim that eating whale meat is a tradition, but what is the role of SMOs in making whaling into a tradition identified with a local…

Abstract

South Koreans in the city of Ulsan claim that eating whale meat is a tradition, but what is the role of SMOs in making whaling into a tradition identified with a local identity? In following account of a confrontation that took place in Korea between anti-whaling protesters from Greenpeace and local defenders of whaling, it is shown that tradition is not an inevitable outcome of conserving the past; instead, it is an outcome of mobilization, framing, and choices made by movement participants. Tradition in the whaling town of Ulsan was formed through the encounter between opposed social movements, prompting strategic choices of counterframing, frame bridging, and the dissonance between framing and feeling rules. Through the encounters with transnational activists, the Korean defenders of whaling refashioned themselves as rooted cosmopolitans, utilizing global norms to justify local practices in the name of heritage and tradition.

Details

Power and Protest
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-834-5

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Jae Yeon Yang, Soyon Paek, Taegoo (Terry) Kim and Tae Hee Lee

The purpose of this study is to explore the effect of tourists’ needs for healing experience (NHE) on behavioral intentions for transformation (BIT) with healing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the effect of tourists’ needs for healing experience (NHE) on behavioral intentions for transformation (BIT) with healing involvement (HI) as a mediator. Using the two sub-constructs of BIT in the tourism industry (i.e. selection of healing tour products and transformational intention of healing tour behavior), this study evaluates BIT.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey was administered to visitors in healing resorts/centers in Korea; 383 completed surveys were used to investigate the hypothesized relationships of this study using regression analysis.

Findings

The study results confirmed the hypothesized relationships: the positive effects of NHE on BIT and the significant mediating role of HI in the relationships between NHE and BIT.

Practical implications

The relationships among NHE, HI and BIT can improve the understanding and practices of healing experience and the development of healing products in the tourism industry. This study offers a meaningful and extended perspective on customers’ experience and product development by interpreting customers’ desires and needs.

Originality/value

This study explores the under-researched subject of NHE and HI from a transformative economic perspective. The study is among the first to examine the structural relationships among NHE, HI and BIT. The uniqueness of the study is highlighted by the use of two sub-dimensions of the BIT industry (i.e. selection of healing tour products and transformational intention of healing tour behavior) in a tourism context.

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Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2005

Young-Myon Lee and Michael Byungnam Lee

While the origin of Korean Industrial Relations goes back 150 years when the country opened its seaports to foreign countries, it didn’t emerge as a field of study until…

Abstract

While the origin of Korean Industrial Relations goes back 150 years when the country opened its seaports to foreign countries, it didn’t emerge as a field of study until 1950s when academics began to write books and papers on the Korean labor movement, labor laws, and labor economics. In this paper, we sketch this history and describe important events and people that contributed to the development of industrial relations in Korea. Korean industrial relations in the early 20th century were significantly distorted by the 35-year-Japanese colonial rule (1910–1945). After regaining its independence, the U.S. backed, growth-oriented, military-based, authoritarian Korean government followed suit and consistently suppressed organized labor until 1987. Finally, the 1987 Great Labor Offensive allowed the labor movement to flourish in a democratized society. Three groups were especially influential in the field of industrial relations in the early 1960s: labor activists, religious leaders, and university faculty. Since then, numerous scholars have published books and papers on Korean industrial relations, whose perspectives, goals, and processes are still being debated and argued. The Korean Industrial Relations Association (KIRA) was formed on March 25, 1990 and many other academic and practitioner associations have also come into being since then. The future of industrial relations as a field of study in Korea does not seem bright, however. Issues regarding organized labor are losing attention because of a steadily shrinking unionization rate, changing societal attitude toward labor unions, and the enactment of new and improved laws and regulations regarding employment relationships more broadly. Thus, we suggest that emerging issues such as contingent workers, works councils and tripartite partnership, conflict management, and human rights will be addressed by the field of industrial relations in Korea only if this field breaks with its traditional focus on union and union–management relations.

Details

Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-265-8

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