Search results

1 – 10 of 24
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Alex Anlesinya, Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah and Kwasi Dartey-Baah

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review talent management research in Africa with the aim of developing a multilevel talent management model and defining future…

1559

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review talent management research in Africa with the aim of developing a multilevel talent management model and defining future research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review is performed utilising studies published on the topic from 2008 to 2019 in various research databases.

Findings

The findings highlighted various talent management contributions and challenges in the African context. They further revealed major issues with the nature of research method adopted in talent management research in Africa. Moreover, contextually, apart from Southern Africa sub-region, talent management research is highly under-researched in the North African, West African and Eastern African sub-regions of the continent. Therefore, talent management research in Africa can be described as being at an embryonic stage.

Practical implications

Effective talent management has significant transformative and growth power through its varied positive contributions. Talent management in Africa is faced with numerous organisational and macro-level challenges and requires attention from relevant stakeholders, if African talents are to be harnessed to facilitate the development of the continent.

Originality/value

This systematic review on talent management is the first of its kind focusing solely on Africa. Also, this study contributes further evidence by proposing a multilevel talent management model based on the synthesised evidence since multilevel research in the field of talent management is very limited.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Francis Xavier Dery Tuokuu and Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has gained global prominence in recent years. This is because businesses have seen the need to consider the interests of stakeholders not…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has gained global prominence in recent years. This is because businesses have seen the need to consider the interests of stakeholders not only to enhance their corporate image but also to live good neighbourly lives with the communities in which they operate. The purpose of this paper is to examine the value of engaging stakeholders and recommend multinational corporations not to take over the governance of countries in which they operate as a result of their financial muscle but to play complementary roles to help in the development of those countries. Although CSR is no longer new in Africa according to recent studies, it is suffering from identity crisis, as it has been used generally and severally to refer to different issues. This conceptual paper discusses the notion of CSR practice in Africa and the major issues and debates around it. It looks at the role of government and civil society organisations that are at the forefront playing watchdog and vigilante roles for the benefit of the society.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper.

Findings

The paper argues that business and society cannot exist without working together and that responsible business is key to sustainable development. It traces the roots of CSR and the emergence of the concept. It advises that what is required in Africa is for the media and civil society organizations to play watchdog and vigilante roles in ensuring that businesses are socially responsible, accountable and transparent. If governments and businesses are transparent and accountable, then the citizens become the greatest beneficiary. The profit margins of businesses will also increase and there will be sustainable development. The paper also indicates that the concept of CSR is gaining grounds in Africa and is no longer new as indicated by previous studies. It recommends that Africa should have its own CSR programmes designed to fit into the African setting. The paper examines the major issues and debates on CSR and concludes that any attempt to introduce uniform laws to ensure responsible business operations universally will not work as situations differ from country to country. The overreliance on corporate entities, particularly Multinational corporations (MNCs) and transnational corporation (TNCs), for the direct development of African economies is not sustainable, as these corporate entities cannot continue to fulfil these obligations meant for the development of infrastructure and still be expected to provide basic amenities for communities under the guise of fulfilling CSR. This process of national development is unsustainable.

Originality/value

The paper recommends a multi-stakeholder approach in designing and implementing CSR programmes. The government, civil society, community and the company should collaborate and constantly have stakeholder engagements as that are the only way of attaining a win-win benefit. MNCs and TNCs should see the government and other stakeholders as partners in development and not lord it over them as a result of their financial muscle. It is recommended that more research work be done in CSR education in Africa. This is to enable business operators and communities understand the true meaning of CSR and to know that the concept goes beyond philanthropy or donations. It will also help them understand that the concept goes beyond community relations to include issues such as human rights, child labour, environmental governance and corporate tax among others.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2022

Alex Anlesinya, Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah, Kwasi Dartey-Baah, Sampson Kudjo Adeti and Adwoa Benewaa Brefo-Manuh

There is a major lacuna in sustainable human resource management (HRM) research regarding the theoretical context of its adoption or implementation. Consequently, the purpose of…

1189

Abstract

Purpose

There is a major lacuna in sustainable human resource management (HRM) research regarding the theoretical context of its adoption or implementation. Consequently, the purpose of this study is to examine the relative influence and interactive effects of different levels of institutional isomorphisms on sustainable HRM adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies the conceptual method and anchors the discussions on the institutional theory and the extant literature on the antecedents of sustainable HRM implementation.

Findings

Internal and external institutional isomorphisms will have complementary (synergies) or substitution (trade-offs) effects on sustainable HRM adoption. Furthermore, external institutional isomorphic pressures related to societal values and culture and stakeholders’ sustainability demands are likely to have greater influence on sustainable HRM implementation relative to the internal institutional isomorphic pressures related to managerial sustainability values and attitudes; sustainability-related HRM competencies; resource availability; and perceived sustainability benefits.

Originality/value

This study proposes a novel multi-level conceptual model on the implementation context of sustainable HRM for testing empirically. Furthermore, this study generates insight on how different levels of institutional isomorphic pressures relatively and interactively (synergies versus trade-offs) affect sustainable HRM adoption. This is significant because there is a view that HRM as a discipline is theoretically weak. Although the field has advanced theoretically, one of the areas that need more theorisation is the context of HRM. Hence, this study advances the theoretical context of sustainable HRM implementation through the perspectives of the institutional theory.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 55 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Alex Anlesinya, Kwasi Dartey-Baah and Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah

The purpose of this paper is to review strategic talent management (STM) research with the aim of providing major insights into the under-explored themes, issues, theories and…

2264

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review strategic talent management (STM) research with the aim of providing major insights into the under-explored themes, issues, theories and methods.

Design/methodology/approach

The method included a systematic review of studies from 2007 to 2019 in five reputable academic databases. In total, 51 studies met the inclusion criteria and were analysed.

Findings

STM can be leveraged to achieve several positive employee, organisational and macro-level outcomes. However, the realisation of these positive outcomes can be threatened by several challenges, which need to be addressed through the creation of conditions critical for the success of talent management strategies. Moreover, effective talent management strategy regime does not lie on the shoulders of just one individual but a collective responsibility of multiple stakeholders. The study also highlighted the digitalisation of STM, integration of ethical and responsible management principles into talent management strategies, and strategic management of unconventional of talent pools as key trends. Finally, several major weaknesses in the current STM scholarship from theoretical, content, context and methodological perspectives are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

Although the studies included in the analysis may not include all studies published during the study period, it is assumed that they provide a good representation of such studies.

Originality/value

Since no systematic study was conducted specifically on STM, this study contributes to the talent management literature by identifying several research issues and gaps while defining future directions of the field. It can, therefore, enrich STM debates, practices and policy making.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 51 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 July 2020

Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah, Akosua Konadu Boateng and Samuel Doku Tetteh

This study examined the relationship between safety climate and employees' voluntary work behaviours (i.e. organisational citizenship behaviour and counterproductive work…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined the relationship between safety climate and employees' voluntary work behaviours (i.e. organisational citizenship behaviour and counterproductive work behaviour). It also examined the moderating role of employees' voice on the relationship between safety climate and employees' voluntary work behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the quantitative survey research design, data were collected from 220 respondents from three manufacturing companies in Accra, Ghana. Pearson's correlation test (r) and hierarchical multiple regression were used for data analysis.

Findings

Results showed that safety climate plays a significant role in predicting employees' voluntary work behaviours. Also, employees' voice was found to moderate the relationship between safety climate and organisational citizenship behaviour but does not moderate the relationship between safety climate and counterproductive work behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Data was collected from manufacturing firms in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana; hence, the findings may be limited to just the manufacturing industry in the Ghanaian setting.

Originality/value

This paper positions safety climate as a catalyst for positive voluntary work behaviours in the workplace and an antidote to negative workplace behaviours. It also highlights the role of employees' voice in enhancing positive voluntary workplace behaviours of employees.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah, John Louis Opata and Samuel Doku Tetteh

This study examined the actual productive hours of employees from the service sector in Ghana.

1569

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined the actual productive hours of employees from the service sector in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted an exploratory cross-sectional survey design. The purposive and convenience sampling techniques were used to identify the service organizations and recruited 520 employees in Accra for the study. Specifically, these respondents were workers from banks, insurance companies, auditing firms and oil and gas companies. The data were analyzed using frequencies and other descriptive statistics.

Findings

Results showed poor time management among the study organizations. It was reported that although most workers report to work as early as 6:30 a.m., they wait until 8:30 a.m. to commence the day’s work schedule. In addition, they start thinking of break at least 15 min before actual break time which decreases productivity. In addition, employees reported spending at least 30 min on break. They also added that, they start clearing the desks about 15 min before actual closing time and leave the office at exactly 5:00 p.m.

Practical Implications

This study shows that the physical presence of workers does not necessarily mean they are working. The study proposes an alternative way to increase productivity rather than relying on physical presence of the workers.

Originality/value

This study is among the few that empirically sought to explore the actual time that workers use in a day at work. Thus, it measured actual productive hours at of service employees in Ghana.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 60 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

Joshua King Safo Lartey, Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah and Joseph Osafo

Navigating the physical and emotional conditions of patients on daily basis can be emotionally exhaustive, requiring health professional to regulate their emotions in order to…

Abstract

Purpose

Navigating the physical and emotional conditions of patients on daily basis can be emotionally exhaustive, requiring health professional to regulate their emotions in order to provide quality healthcare. The present study set out to examine the consequential effect of emotional intelligence and perceived organizational support (POS) on emotional exhaustion of nurses and midwives in the Ghanaian context. The study also examined the effects of age and cadres of nursing and midwifery on emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was quantitative in nature and employed the cross-sectional design in sampling respondents. The study was conducted in four public hospitals and two quasi-public hospitals in three main districts in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana. A sample of 342 nurses and midwives were proportionately sampled from various health facilities. The sample constituted of staff nurses and midwives.

Findings

The study revealed that while age, cadres of nursing and midwifery and POS had consequential effects on emotional exhaustion, emotional intelligence failed to predict emotional exhaustion.

Originality/value

Findings of the study draw the attention to the importance of organizational support in attenuating the emotional exhaustion associated with the nursing profession.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2020

Alex Anlesinya, Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah, Philip Kofi Adom, Obi Berko Obeng Damoah and Kwasi Dartey-Baah

There is a paucity of research on the causal relationships between talent management (TM), decent work and national well-being. Hence, this study examines the nexus between macro…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a paucity of research on the causal relationships between talent management (TM), decent work and national well-being. Hence, this study examines the nexus between macro talent management (MTM) practices, decent work and national well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employed longitudinal data from 77 developing countries across the globe and also utilised panel data estimators and the bootstrapping mediation method for the analyses.

Findings

The results indicated that macro-level TM strategies can have a positive impact on decent work. Decent work also significantly improves national well-being (both subjective and economic well-being) over time as it shows a significant positive impact on change in national well-being measures. Furthermore, decent work serves as a mechanism that links MTM to improved national well-being at the macro level.

Practical implications

TM investments by governments can empower citizens to escape the tragedy of vulnerable and low-quality employment and well-being deficit as it has the potential to improve decent work and national well-being as enshrined in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Originality/value

Beyond the myopic organisational and managerialist view, the authors show that TM can have a positive spillover impact on people and the general society across time by enhancing decent work opportunities to improve both subjective and economic well-being of citizens in a country. Additionally, because decent work has psychosocial and economic dimensions, this study has revealed a complex and compelling conduit for translating the gains of macro-level TM strategies to improve national well-being. Moreover, it provides original empirical evidence to expand the limited longitudinal TM literature. Lastly, it adds to knowledge in the developing countries' context.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2020

Alex Anlesinya and Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah

This study aims to critically examine talent management practices and strategies from ethical and responsible management perspectives.

6548

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to critically examine talent management practices and strategies from ethical and responsible management perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

It achieves its aim through conceptual analysis by theorising through the lenses of talent philosophies, the organisational justice theory, the stakeholder theory and extant literature.

Findings

A responsible talent management construct and mode to guide the practice of talent management in a socially responsible way is developed. It argues that inclusivity; corporate responsibility; and equity and equal employment opportunity are the key underlying principles of a responsible talent management system. This study further argues that responsible talent management practices promote achievement of multilevel sustainable outcomes such as decent work, employee well-being and organisational well-being.

Practical implications

Emphasising responsible management and ethical concerns in organisational talent strategies and practices is non-negotiable, given the current level of interest in sustainable work and employment and in the quest to achieve sustainable human and organisational outcomes through management and organisational practices.

Originality/value

The development of a responsible talent management construct and model is original and novel and is expected to shape thinking and drive new research directions in the field of talent management. It further contributes directly to knowledge and practice by demonstrating how organisations can manage their talents in a responsible way.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 44 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2023

Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah, Justice Mensah, Ruth Boakyewaa and Grace Asare

Building on the emerging literature on the psychology of working theory, this study aims to examine the impact of decent work on employees’ mental health as well as the…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on the emerging literature on the psychology of working theory, this study aims to examine the impact of decent work on employees’ mental health as well as the association between the dimensions of decent work on employees’ mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative data were collected from 260 employees working in the Ghanaian mining industry.

Findings

Data analysis showed a positive significant relationship between decent work and employee mental health. Furthermore, access to health care, adequate compensation and hours that allow for free time and rest related positively and significantly with employee mental health. However, the relationships between physical and interpersonal safe working conditions, organizational values that complement family and social values and employee mental health were not significant.

Originality/value

The findings extend the emerging literature relative to the influence of decent work on mental health in developing country context, specifically, sub-Saharan Africa where concerns for decent work have become extremely relevant because of the experience of extreme poverty and unemployment that characterize the region.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 65 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 24