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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Reason Baathuli Nfila and Kwasi Darko‐Ampem

Traces the term “library consortium” as a form of co‐operation among libraries. Focuses on reasons for forming consortia and types, ranging from highly decentralised to…

Abstract

Traces the term “library consortium” as a form of co‐operation among libraries. Focuses on reasons for forming consortia and types, ranging from highly decentralised to highly centralised. Literature on consortia is mostly reported in four sources. Highlights the formation of the International Association of Library Consortia in 1997. The current trend is one of sharing integrated library systems and computer databases, collection development, purchasing of electronic journals, and staff development. What has been achieved is the provision of resources to patrons that did not have them before the consortia, as well as increased levels of services and convenience of patrons. By libraries banding together, cost savings come through reduced cost per unit as the group of libraries in the consortium shares the expenditure.

Details

Library Management, vol. 23 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Kwasi Darko‐Ampem

The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the application of project management principles to retrospective conversion of a library catalogue and to share the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the application of project management principles to retrospective conversion of a library catalogue and to share the experience with other libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

Presents the case of retrospective conversion involving the conversion of card catalogue records and the serials automation at the Faculty of Engineering and Technology Library of the University of Botswana.

Findings

Highlights project management concepts as a means of managing library projects for the optimum benefit of the institution, staff and patrons.

Research limitations/implications

The project involved the conversion of 10,000 manual records and the automation of 250 current journals.

Practical implications

Identifies constraints such as staffing, training and retraining; equipment malfunction and access to online resources; and conflict of work priorities.

Originality/value

A case study of project management applications in academic libraries. Both projects involved project scheduling, staff training, scheduling of duties, and writing of in‐house manuals, all based on project management principles.

Details

Library Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Abstract

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Library Management, vol. 26 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Raymond Talinbe Abdulai and Kwasi Gyau Baffour Awuah

The United Nations (UN) sustainable development goals (SDGs) that became effective at the commencement of January 2016 constitute a global community agreement calling for…

Abstract

The United Nations (UN) sustainable development goals (SDGs) that became effective at the commencement of January 2016 constitute a global community agreement calling for action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity. This chapter looks at the nexus between real estate (RE) and SDGs by investigating the extent to which Ghana's RE sector incorporates, especially, environmental sustainability principles from the design and construction stages to occupation, operation and activities aimed at helping to solve the problem of climate change, thereby, contributing to achieving the SDGs. The chapter is theoretical and, therefore, heavily reliant on critical review of relevant extant literature. The chapter has shown that RE cuts across virtually all the sectors that contribute greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, which over the years have generally been increasing. Only a few buildings in both the private and public sectors (six located in three of the 16 administrative regions in the country) are officially classified as green based on three sustainability-rating systems currently used in the country, which suggests that the uptake of green building technologies (GBTs) is rather low leading to the conclusion that at the moment, the RE sector is not contributing much towards the attainment of the SDGs. However, it may be the case that there are buildings, which are sustainable in one form or the other, but because they have not been officially certified, they are not regarded as green – employing the services of the sustainability-rating agencies to certify buildings involve significant costs that might serve as a barrier in accessing their services. Thus, there is the need for country-wide, large-scale studies that systematically investigate the uptake of GBTs in the private and public RE sectors (not necessarily based on using the rating systems) as that may reveal the actual uptake of GBTs and what can be done policy-wise based on the outcomes of such studies.

Details

Sustainable Real Estate in the Developing World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-838-8

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Article
Publication date: 14 February 2018

Samuel Famiyeh, Ebenezer Adaku, Kwasi Amoako-Gyampah, Disraeli Asante-Darko and Charles Teye Amoatey

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between environmental management practices (EMP) and competitive operational performance with respect to reduced…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between environmental management practices (EMP) and competitive operational performance with respect to reduced cost, improved quality, improved flexibility and improved delivery as well as overall environmental performance, of firms, using data from a developing country.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a survey approach with responses from 164 informants from different industries and used partial least squares structural equation modeling to examine the relationship between EMP and competitive operational performance and their overall impact on the environmental performance of firms.

Findings

The results indicate that EMP by firms have a significant positive effect on firms’ competitive operational performance. Again, firms’ competitive operational performance has a partial positive effect on the overall environmental performance. It was also realized that the EMP initiated by a firm have a direct positive impact on the overall environmental performance of the firm.

Research limitations/implications

There is the need for organizations to take steps to plan and implement EMP since it is likely to enhance their competitive operational performance as well as their overall environmental performance.

Practical implications

The findings demonstrate the impact of EMP on competitive operational performance as well as on the overall environmental performance of firms. This is important as firms struggle with balancing investments in those practices against the perceived benefits that might be obtained from the practices.

Originality/value

The work provides insights and adds to the literature in the area of EMP and firm performance by providing evidence from a developing country environment. This study is among the few that have investigated the impact of EMP on firm performance in developing country environments.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Kwasi Gyau Baffour Awuah and Raymond Talinbe Abdulai

Although a basic need, housing and its development activities impinge on the environment. As part of efforts to promote sustainability, there have been several initiatives…

Abstract

Although a basic need, housing and its development activities impinge on the environment. As part of efforts to promote sustainability, there have been several initiatives since the Brundtland Commission's work in 1987 to minimise the adverse impact of housing development activities on the environment in the developing world such as sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). This chapter explores housing development activities in Ghana within the context of environmental sustainability based on the extant literature. The aim is to examine the state and promotion of environmental sustainability in the housing development sector. The chapter establishes that although there are some efforts to promote environmental sustainability within the housing development sector, uptake of environmental sustainability practices has been less satisfactory due to lack of incentives as stakeholders perceive that environmentally sustainable homes are more expensive than conventional ones. The chapter, therefore, recommends further investigations into the cost and benefit of environmentally sustainable homes as well as other drivers in Ghana to give additional insights to provide the appropriate doses of incentives both contrived and instinctive to drive uptake.

Details

Sustainable Real Estate in the Developing World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-838-8

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Yaw Agyabeng-Mensah, Ebenezer Afum, Innocent Senyo Kwasi Acquah, Essel Dacosta, Charles Baah and Esther Ahenkorah

The priority giving to green practices in today's competitive market has made green logistics management practices (GLMPS) a significant driver of organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The priority giving to green practices in today's competitive market has made green logistics management practices (GLMPS) a significant driver of organizational performance. The purpose of this study is to explore the influence of GLMPS, logistics ecocentricity and supply chain traceability on sustainability performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses structured questionnaires to gather data from 274 managers of manufacturing firms in Ghana. The partial least square structural equation modeling approach is used to analyze the data to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results obtained from the analysis indicate that GLMPS positively influence social sustainability and environmental sustainability. However, GLMPS negatively influence business performance. The results further reveal that logistics ecocentricity and supply chain traceability augment GLMPS to achieve significant improvement in both business performance and environmental sustainability through the mediation effect approach.

Originality/value

The study proposes a conceptual framework that tests the combined effect of GLMPs, logistics ecocentricity and supply chain traceability on environmental sustainability, social sustainability and business performance from the Ghanaian perspective.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2020

Innocent Senyo Kwasi Acquah, Yaw Agyabeng-Mensah and Ebenezer Afum

The increasing concern for the protection of the environment through pollution prevention, conservation of resources and less usage of energy has attracted several firms…

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing concern for the protection of the environment through pollution prevention, conservation of resources and less usage of energy has attracted several firms to align green practices with their supply chain and human resource policies and practices. This study explores the influence of green human resource management and green supply chain management practices on operational, market, financial, social and environmental performances.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses partial least square–structural equation modeling approach to analyze the data gathered through structured questionnaires from supply chain and human resource managers in manufacturing and hospitality firms in Ghana.

Findings

It is established that green supply chain management practices play complementary partial mediating role between green human resource management and operational, market, social and environmental performances, while it plays competitive partial mediating role between green human resource management and financial performance. Subsequently, the analysis reveals that the synergy between green human resource management and green supply chain management creates the highest value in operational performance, followed by market performance, environmental performance, financial performance and social performance.

Originality/value

The study proposes and tests a conceptual model that examines the synergistic influence of green human resource management and green supply chain management on operational, market, financial, social and environmental performances.

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2020

Ebenezer Afum, Yaw Agyabeng-Mensah, Zhuo Sun, Bright Frimpong, Lawrence Yaw Kusi and Innocent Senyo Kwasi Acquah

The aim of this study is to explore the link between green manufacturing practices, operational competitiveness, firm reputation and sustainable performance dimensions as…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to explore the link between green manufacturing practices, operational competitiveness, firm reputation and sustainable performance dimensions as well as advance a mediation approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The study resorted to structured questionnaire to collect data from 158 manufacturing firms from different industries, and partial least square–structural equation modelling is used to test all hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The results indicate that green manufacturing has a positive significant impact on social, economic and environmental performance. However, firm reputation and operational competitiveness were found not to significantly influence economic performance. The mediation analysis also showed that operational competitiveness, firm reputation and environmental performance play no mediation role between green manufacturing and economic performance. Furthermore, social performance is found to mediate the relationship between green manufacturing and economic performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study did not consider any moderator variables. Also, the universal applicability and generalizability are somewhat a problem since data was mainly collected from Ghana, an emerging country.

Practical implications

The results provide managers with reasonable evidence to proactively implement and invest in green manufacturing practices because such practices will not only have a positive impact on their sustainable performance dimensions but further enhance operational competitiveness and provide firms with superior reputation.

Originality/value

The study provides significant findings that contribute to and expand the literature on green manufacturing, and it is among the relatively few studies that has investigated the link between green manufacturing, sustainable performance dimensions, firm reputation and operational competitiveness, especially from a mediation analysis perspective.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

James Osei Mensah, Kwasi Ohene-Yankyera and Robert Aidoo

Considering the fact that business management training has the potential to improve performance of micro and small enterprises, it is surprising why participation rates in…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering the fact that business management training has the potential to improve performance of micro and small enterprises, it is surprising why participation rates in most freely offered management training courses remain low. The purpose of this paper is to explore factors that determine an invitee’s decision to participate in a capacity building management training for street food entrepreneurs in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from a baseline survey, the study invited 314 street food entrepreneurs, selected through a stratified random technique from a list of 516 eligible food entrepreneurs. Training participants were invited to the programme through official invitation letters which were hand-delivered. Data on reasons for non-participation were collected either through phone interviews or on-site visit when a vendor could not be reached on phone. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise characteristics of vendors and businesses as well as reasons for non-participation while probit model was used to estimate determinants of participation.

Findings

The study found that whereas vendors with higher formal education better appreciate the benefits of education and training, their counterparts with fewer years of schooling do not. The latter’s perceived knowledge deficiencies appear to explain the difference in participation rates. Also, total workforce does not necessarily increase the probability of participation, especially when there are no trusted workers in the business who will take over critical activities such as handling of finances in the absence of the owner. The study also found that distance between vending premises and training centres had significant negative effects on vendors’ participation in the training programme.

Research limitations/implications

The external validity of the study findings and conclusions may not be limited to all informal sectors of the developing economies due to high degree of heterogeneity of the informal economy.

Originality/value

The study focusses on an informal sector in developing country dominated by women. The study focusses on understanding informal entrepreneurs’ response to formal training.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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