Search results

1 – 5 of 5
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Franklin Nantui Mabe, Gideon Danso-Abbeam, Shaibu Baanni Azumah, Nathaniel Amoh Boateng, Kwadwo B. Mensah and Ethel Boateng

Cocoa is regarded as a brown-golden crop, but its value chain activities are dominated by the elderly. Hence, focussing attention on the young generation of farmers is the…

Abstract

Purpose

Cocoa is regarded as a brown-golden crop, but its value chain activities are dominated by the elderly. Hence, focussing attention on the young generation of farmers is the surest way to reverse this trend and secure the future of the cocoa industry. This paper, therefore explores factors influencing youth participation in cocoa value chain activities in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected using a multistage sampling technique. The authors used a semi-structured questionnaire in collecting data via interviews. Through the theory of utility maximization, a multivariate probit (MVP) model was estimated to identify factors influencing youth participation in cocoa value chain activities in Ghana.

Findings

The author found that some of the value chain activities are complementary, while others are substitutes. Participation in cocoa value chain activities is influenced by access to land, participation in training programmes in cocoa production, membership of Next Generation Cocoa Youth Programme (MASO), access to agricultural credit and other demographic characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

Relevant information and youth-targeted projects enhance their participation in value chain activities.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the few studies that empirically analyses drivers of youth participation in cocoa value chain activities in Africa.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 April 2019

Kwadwo Owusu, Ayisi Kofi Emmanuel, Issah Justice Musah-Surugu and Paul William Kojo Yankson

This paper aims to provide empirical evidence on the El Nino and its effects on maize production in three municipalities: Ejura, Techiman and Wenchi in the transitional…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide empirical evidence on the El Nino and its effects on maize production in three municipalities: Ejura, Techiman and Wenchi in the transitional zone of Ghana. Using a mixed approach, the study details the effects of the El Nino on rainy season characteristics, particularly, rainfall amounts and distribution, onset and cessation of rains, duration of the rainy season and total seasonal rainfall and how it impacted smallholder maize production.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a mixed method approach in collecting and analyzing data. For stronger evidence building, (Creswell, 2013) the authors combined interviews and focus group discussions (FGD) to collect the qualitative data. Semi-structured questionnaires were administered to extension officers, management information system officers and other relevant personnel of the Ministry of Agriculture in the three municipalities. Six FGD’s were held for maize farmers in six communities in all three municipalities.

Findings

The study shows that the 2015 El Nino had dire consequences on farm yields, subsequently affecting farmer’s incomes and livelihoods. The study further finds that complex socio-cultural factors, some unrelated to the El Nino, aggravated the effects on maize farmers. These include the lack of adequate climatic information, predominance of rain-fed farming, a lack of capacity to adapt and existing levels of poverty.

Originality/value

The study recommends inter alia, appropriate use of seasonal rainfall forecasting to enhance better farming decision-making and the development of elaborate climate variability interventions by national and local agencies.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2016

Alexandra L. Ferrentino, Meghan L. Maliga, Richard A. Bernardi and Susan M. Bosco

This research provides accounting-ethics authors and administrators with a benchmark for accounting-ethics research. While Bernardi and Bean (2010) considered publications…

Abstract

This research provides accounting-ethics authors and administrators with a benchmark for accounting-ethics research. While Bernardi and Bean (2010) considered publications in business-ethics and accounting’s top-40 journals this study considers research in eight accounting-ethics and public-interest journals, as well as, 34 business-ethics journals. We analyzed the contents of our 42 journals for the 25-year period between 1991 through 2015. This research documents the continued growth (Bernardi & Bean, 2007) of accounting-ethics research in both accounting-ethics and business-ethics journals. We provide data on the top-10 ethics authors in each doctoral year group, the top-50 ethics authors over the most recent 10, 20, and 25 years, and a distribution among ethics scholars for these periods. For the 25-year timeframe, our data indicate that only 665 (274) of the 5,125 accounting PhDs/DBAs (13.0% and 5.4% respectively) in Canada and the United States had authored or co-authored one (more than one) ethics article.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-973-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Mariama Zakari, Courage Simon Kofi Dogbe and Collins Asante

The study aims to assess the moderating role of celebrity characteristics in the relationship between celebrity endorsement and telecommunication companies’ reputation.

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to assess the moderating role of celebrity characteristics in the relationship between celebrity endorsement and telecommunication companies’ reputation.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of results was based on 700 customers in the telecommunication sector. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to check for validity and reliability of the observed items. A hierarchical regression model was estimated to test the various hypotheses set for the study.

Findings

The study finds that celebrity endorsement in itself had no significant effect on the reputation of telecommunication companies. Celebrity attractiveness, likeability and trustworthiness had a direct effect (positive) on the reputation of telecommunication companies and positively moderated the effect of celebrity endorsement on telecommunication company reputation. Celebrity expertise had no direct effect on telecommunication company reputation but positively moderated the effect of celebrity endorsement and telecommunication company reputation.

Research limitations/implications

This study was purely quantitative. Future study could consider a mixed approach and include senior management members of the telecom firms for an in-depth interview.

Practical implications

In signing on celebrities as brand ambassadors, management must pay particular attention to celebrity attractiveness, likeability and trustworthiness. This would be more rewarding to the firms.

Originality/value

The study adds to the little empirical knowledge available on celebrity endorsement in sub-Saharan Africa and telecommunication sector in particular.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 42 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Shamsuddin Ahamad, Hamdan Amerali Al-jaifi and Md Imtiaz Mostafiz

The development of family-based microenterprises has attracted the attention of regulators, microfinance institutions and other stakeholders in either developing or least…

Abstract

Purpose

The development of family-based microenterprises has attracted the attention of regulators, microfinance institutions and other stakeholders in either developing or least developed countries. In the finance literature, several studies have examined the determinants of the family-based microenterprises development; however, there are several venues that need to be examined. The study aims to explain the economic profit of microenterprises from resource-based theory and human capital perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on critical review and theoretical grounding, this study proposes a conceptual framework, which bridges intangible resources with economic growth of microenterprises.

Findings

After reviewing previous studies and based on the underpinning theoretical framework, the study finds that human capital is one of the variables that has received a little attention and yet to be examined as a moderating role. Based on the human capital theorist, individual's competencies help enterprises to perform better in business, as enterprises that possess competencies and capabilities are more likely to have higher levels of growth and profitability.

Practical implications

This finding provides useful implications for the stakeholders and policymakers and contributes in the future literature.

Originality/value

Based on critical review and theoretical grounding, this study proposes a conceptual framework, which bridges intangible resources with economic growth of microenterprises.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5