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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Kurt Matzler, Stephan Friedrich von den Eichen, Markus Anschober and Thomas Kohler

This paper aims to help managers understand digital disruption and implement strategies that will support the digital transformation of companies. Traditional companies…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to help managers understand digital disruption and implement strategies that will support the digital transformation of companies. Traditional companies need to learn from disruptive ventures and reimagine their business models based on digitalization.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on multiple case studies of both disruptive startups and established organizations navigating digital transformations.

Findings

The authors introduce three levels of digitalization to build a framework of six different value creation stages that result from digitalization. Companies need to create digital products, enhance their processes with digital technology and most important reimagine their business models.

Practical implications

Managers receive guidance on how to deal with digital disruption. They can learn from pathfinding companies that successfully leveraged digital technology to create and capture new value.

Originality/value

The original contribution of this paper is a simple and useful framework to understand and leverage digital disruption.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2016

Kurt Matzler, Andreas Strobl and Franz Bailom

Under certain conditions, a mass of people can be smarter than the best expert – even if the expert is part of the group. In this paper we show how leaders can improve…

1879

Abstract

Purpose

Under certain conditions, a mass of people can be smarter than the best expert – even if the expert is part of the group. In this paper we show how leaders can improve decision making by tapping into the collective intelligence of their organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on James Surowiecki’s four conditions of collective intelligence (cognitive diversity, independence, utilization of decentralized knowledge, and effective aggregation of dispersed knowledge), we discuss how leaders can tap into the wisdom of the crowd of their organizations.

Findings

We show how leaders can increase cognitive diversity in decision making, access decentralized knowledge in their organizations, encourage individuals to contribute their knowledge without interference from peer pressure, conformity or influence from superiors, and how knowledge can effectively be aggregated to make wiser decisions.

Originality/value

While various tools exist to reap the collective intelligence of a group, we argue that leaders also must change their attitudes and leadership styles. Using evidence from various studies and several examples we show what leaders can do to make smarter decisions.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Kurt Matzler, Birgit Renzl and Rita Faullant

The purpose of this study is to replicate and extend the findings of Matzler et al.'s recent paper on the dimensionality of price satisfaction. Furthermore, a test is…

4223

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to replicate and extend the findings of Matzler et al.'s recent paper on the dimensionality of price satisfaction. Furthermore, a test is performed to ascertain whether the relationship between satisfaction with the individual price dimensions and overall satisfaction is symmetric or asymmetric, as the three‐factor theory of customer satisfaction suggests.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a random sample of 406 bank customers, the impact of five price dimensions (price‐quality ratio, price fairness, price transparency, price reliability, and relative price) on overall satisfaction is tested using structural equation modeling with Partial Least Squares (PLS). The asymmetric relationship is tested using regression analysis with dummy variables.

Findings

The results confirm Matzler et al.'s findings and show that price satisfaction can be conceptualized as a multidimensional construct and that the five price dimensions have a strong and significant impact on overall satisfaction. Furthermore, it is shown that the relationship between satisfaction of individual price dimensions and overall price satisfaction can be asymmetric, indicating that the three‐factor theory of customer satisfaction is applicable also to price satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The study replicates previous findings and supports the multi‐dimensional nature of price satisfaction and shows that the three‐factor theory of customer satisfaction applies also to price satisfaction.

Practical implications

The measurement of price satisfaction at the level of individual price dimensions and the assessment of asymmetric relationships provides managers with more precise data in order to take the right measures to increase satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper confirms previous findings on the dimensionality of price satisfaction in a random sample of bank customers using structural equation modeling with PLS. Hence, it provides strong empirical support for Matzler et al.'s findings.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Harald Pechlaner, Egon Smeral and Kurt Matzier

Destinations are strategic marketing units which consist of territorially delimited, consolidated areas of co‐operation. Options to improve a destination's competitive…

Abstract

Destinations are strategic marketing units which consist of territorially delimited, consolidated areas of co‐operation. Options to improve a destination's competitive edge depend on the determinants of competitiveness. A destination's competitive position can be explained by factor conditions and conditions of demand, quality and structure of sectors involved, strategies as well as market and organizational structures. The competitive system depicted above forms the basis for the creation of “customer value” and therefore is a source of future competitive advantages. Customer value is the gap perceived by the customer between the perceived (multidimensional) benefit and the perceived (multidimensional) costs/prices of a destination compared to its competitors. The aim of the article is the explanation of “Customer Value Management” as a key strategy to affect a destination's competitive position by means of supply‐side measures as well as the communicated and achievable relative consumption/cost position.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 57 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Kurt Matzler and Hubert J. Siller

The youth travel market is an important market segment in terms of size and growth rates. Youth travelers, however, differ in their travel motivations from other market…

1516

Abstract

The youth travel market is an important market segment in terms of size and growth rates. Youth travelers, however, differ in their travel motivations from other market segments. Therefore, in order to attract and satisfy youth travelers it is necessary to match their travel motivations with their perceptions of destinations. Based on an empirical study (N=2.128) among German Youth Travelers a methodology is presented which enables tourism managers to link travel motivations with perceptions of the destination. A two‐dimensioned matrix assesses the degree to which motivations and perceptions correlate. This analytical tool then forms the basis for the formulation of marketing strategies. The results of the empirical study presented in this paper show clear differences between travel motivations in summer and winter tourism and between perceptions of the Alps as a summer and winter destination.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 58 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Kurt Matzler, Andreas Würtele and Birgit Renzl

The purpose of this paper is to explore the dimensionality of price satisfaction. It argues that price satisfaction is composed of several dimensions (price transparency…

6452

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the dimensionality of price satisfaction. It argues that price satisfaction is composed of several dimensions (price transparency, price‐quality ratio, relative price, price confidence, price reliability, and price fairness) and that companies should consider these dimensions when monitoring customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a theoretical discussion of the price dimensions, a questionnaire is developed that measures customer satisfaction with individual price dimensions. Using regression analysis the impact of price satisfaction dimensions on overall price satisfaction is measured, using a sample of 160 students.

Findings

The results show that price satisfaction can be conceptualized as a multidimensional construct and that five dimensions influence overall price satisfaction. The application of the questionnaire allows for measuring price satisfaction in firms.

Research limitations/implications

The paper introduces price satisfaction as a multidimensional construct and the study empirically supports the hypotheses. The student sample, however, restricts generalizability and more studies are needed to test the validity and reliability of the questionnaire.

Practical implications

Based on the measurement of price satisfaction, managers are able to identify the drivers of price satisfaction, their satisfaction and relative importance in different market segments and, consequently they are able to take the right measures to increase customer satisfaction and loyalty.

Originality/value

So far price satisfaction has been treated as a one‐dimensional construct. This paper contains a theoretical argumentation for why price satisfaction should be treated as a multi‐dimensional construct consisting of several dimensions, i.e. price‐quality ratio, price fairness, price transparency, price reliability and relative price. These dimensions constitute the determinants of overall price satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Stephan Friedrich von den Eichen, Joerg Freiling and Kurt Matzler

This paper aims to discuss the barriers to successful business model innovation and derive implications for management on how to overcome each barrier, as many attempts to…

5233

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the barriers to successful business model innovation and derive implications for management on how to overcome each barrier, as many attempts to innovate a business model have failed.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on their experience they gained in numerous business model innovation projects and identify barriers that occur along a cycle of business model innovation, the authors use case examples to describe the barriers and derive managerial implications.

Findings

Barriers to successful business model innovation are related to barriers of awareness, search, system, logic and culture. Very often, these barriers are not recognized as such. Overcoming those barriers has to do with openness, with opening, with networking, with affirmation (and mastering) of complexity and thinking and acting in a whole.

Originality/value

With this paper, the authors contribute to a better understanding of why many business model innovations fail, they identify and describe barriers to business model innovation and develop some recommendations for managers on how to overcome the barriers.

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Kurt Matzler, Todd A. Mooradian, Johann Füller and Markus Anschober

In every market there are non-consumers – potential customers that withstand an innovation. A common reason is that products targeted to early adopters or the mass market

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Abstract

Purpose

In every market there are non-consumers – potential customers that withstand an innovation. A common reason is that products targeted to early adopters or the mass market are over-engineered. Established companies usually neglect the laggards in a market. This offers growth opportunities for new entrants. These market niches can be unlocked when products are simplified and adapted to the special needs of the laggards.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a short case study from an Austrian producer of cell-phones targeted to seniors, and some other examples, we show how innovative solutions can be developed by targeting to the special needs of laggards in a market.

Findings

Technologies usually evolve faster than market needs and established companies, in their efforts to grow and improve profitability, try to innovate faster than their competitors. This often leads to over-engineered products. In many markets there are consumers that withstand these innovative and over-engineered products. A vacuum for low-priced, simple, and easy-to-use solutions emerges. We describe a five-step approach for unlocking these market segments and developing solutions for laggards.

Originality/value

While most companies try to innovate faster than their competitors to defend their market leadership, laggard innovation targets non-consumers in the market. By simplifying over-engineered products and adapting them to the special needs of laggards, new market opportunities emerge. This paper shows how these market niches can be unlocked.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Rita Faullant, Kurt Matzler and Johann Füller

Customer satisfaction is seen to be one of the main determinants of loyalty. However, the relationship between customer satisfaction and loyalty does not seem to be…

8694

Abstract

Purpose

Customer satisfaction is seen to be one of the main determinants of loyalty. However, the relationship between customer satisfaction and loyalty does not seem to be linear, many researchers have reported doubts about the predictability of loyalty solely due to customer satisfaction ratings which ignore image as predictor of loyalty. This paper aims to address the issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors report a study of ski resorts where they first established a causal model of customer satisfaction and image predicting customer loyalty, and then map the scores in a four‐fields‐grid. Additionally the authors conducted a moderator analysis to assess the relative importance of image and satisfaction for loyalty intentions between two different groups (first‐time‐visitors, and regular guests).

Findings

The results show that those ski resorts with the highest satisfaction ratings and the highest image ratings have the highest loyalty scores. Among first‐time‐visitors overall satisfaction is more important than image, with increasing number of repeat visits the importance of overall satisfaction declines and that of image relatively augments.

Practical implications

Besides measuring customer satisfaction, managers must assess also image ratings in order to get a realistic view of the loyalty intentions of their customer base. The scores can than be mapped together with the ratings of other ski resorts, and serve as a benchmark study.

Originality/value

Second order analysis of image (comprising three different dimensions), the image‐satisfaction‐grid, moderating effect of experience to relative importance of satisfaction and image on loyalty.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Kurt Matzler, Sonja Bidmon and Sonja Grabner‐Kräuter

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship among two personality traits (extraversion and openness), hedonic value, brand affect and loyalty. It argues that…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship among two personality traits (extraversion and openness), hedonic value, brand affect and loyalty. It argues that individual differences account for differences in the values sought by the consumer and in the formation of brand affect and loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

Two samples are drawn (running shoes and mobile phone users) and the effect of personality traits on the other constructs have been tested using the Partial Least Squares approach (PLS) to structural equation modeling.

Findings

It was found that extraversion and openness are positively related to hedonic product value and that the personality traits directly (openness) and indirectly (extraversion, via hedonic value) influence brand affect which in turn drives attitudinal and purchase loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

The paper introduces personality as determinants of perceived value and brand affect. Future studies should aim at including the other personality traits of the Big‐Five (Neuroticism, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness) as possible determinants and utilitarian value as dependent variables.

Practical implications

Combined with lifestyle segmentation approaches, personality variables can be useful to determine which market segments seek hedonic values and which tend more to experience high levels of brand affect, which in turn leads to higher loyalty. The results suggest that customers who score high on extraversion and openness respond stronger to affective stimuli. As a consequence, these findings are of relevance to market segmentation and targeting.

Originality/value

Affective responses to brands are of central importance to brand management as they strongly drive brand loyalty. In this study we investigate the role of two personality traits (extraversion and openness) as antecedents of hedonic value sought by the consumer and brand affect, which have been neglected so far.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

1 – 10 of 35