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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Kurt Hess, Abeyratna Gunasekarage and Martin Hovey

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between ownership structure and performance for a comprehensive sample of Chinese listed firms for the years 2000‐2004. In…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between ownership structure and performance for a comprehensive sample of Chinese listed firms for the years 2000‐2004. In particular, the paper seeks to explore the effect of the dominance of state and private blockholders and control on firm performance. It aims to use a more differentiated approach than previous research on the subject, which has mainly focused on the effects of the pervasive state ownership on firm values. Accordingly, the main theme of the paper intends to relate to the analysis of the effects of private blockholders on firm value.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper tests the ownership‐performance relationship for the state and for sub‐samples with predominantly private shareholders. The paper uses both an ordinary least squares and a two‐stage least squares analysis, which treats ownership concentration as endogenous.

Findings

The paper finds evidence that large private blockholdings are to the benefit of firm value for the full sample. Conversely, for smaller samples of companies without or with very low shareholdings by the various state players, there is some evidence that large private block shareholdings might be to the detriment of firm value.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the literature by presenting a more comprehensive treatment of the ownership‐performance relationship of listed firms in China. The main theme of the paper relates to ownership concentration and the effects of private blockholders on the performance of firms, in addition to the endogeneity of ownership. It also contributes by utilising the alternative ownership classification system developed by the National University of Singapore.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Kurt Hess and Graham Francis

This paper examines how ASB Bank, a New Zealand‐based retail bank, made use of cost income ratio benchmarking when reviewing its operational efficiency. In particular, it…

Abstract

This paper examines how ASB Bank, a New Zealand‐based retail bank, made use of cost income ratio benchmarking when reviewing its operational efficiency. In particular, it shows the difficulties associated with the benchmarking process in the sector and details the practical steps taken to obtain meaningful comparative information. It is interesting that, while the cost income ratio was the principal metric used in this benchmarking exercise, it sought to identify best practice not in terms of minimizing this ratio but rather in terms of identifying typical ratios and cost structures among successful banking institutions.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2019

Sungjun Joe and Choongbeom Choi

This paper aims to examine the joint effect of the focal customer’s gender and fellow customer’s gender in influencing voice complaint intentions and intention to convey…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the joint effect of the focal customer’s gender and fellow customer’s gender in influencing voice complaint intentions and intention to convey negative word of mouth (NWOM).

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were randomly assigned to one of the two dining conditions (same-gender fellow customer vs opposite-gender fellow customer). Their intention to voice a complaint and to spread NWOM were measured after reading a scenario describing a service failure. A 2 (focal customer gender: male vs female) × 2 (fellow customer: same gender vs opposite gender) between-subjects quasi-experimental design was conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results demonstrate that female customers’ voice complaint intentions were significantly higher when a fellow customer’s gender was female rather than male. In contrast, regardless of the fellow customer’s gender, no significant differences in voice complaint intentions were found among male customers. The results further indicate that voice complaint intentions mediate the impact of a fellow customer’s gender on intention to spread NWOM among female customers. However, both female and male participants show equally high levels of voice complaint intentions in the context of fine-dining restaurant.

Practical implications

This study broadens the understanding of customer complaining behavior and also provides insights to practitioners on how to manage customers who are in same- and mixed-gender situations.

Originality/value

This research extends the literature on agency–communal theory and complaining behaviors by examining the role of a fellow customer’s gender influencing the focal customer’s intentions to voice complaints and to spread NWOM.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

İ. Taylan Dörtyol, Ayşen Coşkun and Olgun Kitapci

Consumption is a way of communication whereby consumers express, position or/and differentiate themselves within their society or affiliated groups. A great part of…

Abstract

Consumption is a way of communication whereby consumers express, position or/and differentiate themselves within their society or affiliated groups. A great part of consumers’ lives are spent on various purchase activities, and many would be eager to understand the factors underlying those behaviours.

This chapter primarily deals with the cultural, social, psychological and personal factors that affect consumer behaviour. Each of these factors in relation to consumer behaviour is discussed in detail. The types of consumer buying behaviours and the consumer decision-making processes then provide the fundamentals of the topic along with their relevance to Turkish consumers.

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2009

Carol A. Adams and Glen Whelan

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise how future changes in corporate social disclosure (CSD), aimed at improving accountability for corporate performance to key…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise how future changes in corporate social disclosure (CSD), aimed at improving accountability for corporate performance to key stakeholder groups, might be brought about.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the work of the Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises with respect to human (and organisational) action and the work of Leon Festinger and Kurt Lewin with respect to human (and organisational) change, the paper examines how academics and other corporate stakeholders might effect changes in CSD.

Findings

Managers act in a way which maximises their formal happiness (from von Mises) and change occurs following the creation of cognitive dissonance (Festinger) which leads to “unfreezing” (Lewin). Stakeholders can effect change by creating cognitive dissonance. With specific reference to Anglo‐American limited liability and publicly traded corporations, such cognitive dissonance and unfreezing normally involves a perceived threat to profitability.

Research limitations/implications

Research and theorising in corporate social disclosure patterns should take as given: that the managers of Anglo‐American limited liability and publicly traded corporations continue to be strongly encouraged, via both legal and remunerative means, to maximize shareholder wealth; and that this state of affairs significantly influences the information which management choose to disclose. Future research might instead examine and consider means of creating sources of dissonance significant enough to result in managerial concern for change within the constraints imposed on managers of Anglo‐American corporations. Such research might be conducted by engaging with organisations and their stakeholders.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for the manner in which corporate stakeholders act and interrelate with others in order to effect change towards more complete and credible sustainability reports which demonstrate accountability for material impacts to key stakeholder groups.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on how change in corporate behaviour might be brought about given the personal motivations and institutional constraints imposed on the behaviour of corporate actors.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2005

Marcu Handte, Christian Becker and Kurt Rothermel

Pervasive computing envisions seamless support for user tasks through cooperating devices that are present in an environment. Fluctuating availability of devices, induced…

Abstract

Pervasive computing envisions seamless support for user tasks through cooperating devices that are present in an environment. Fluctuating availability of devices, induced by mobility and failures, requires mechanisms and algorithms that allow applications to adapt to their ever‐changing execution environments without user intervention. To ease the development of adaptive applications, Becker et al. (3) have proposed the peer‐based component system PCOM. This system provides fundamental mechanisms to support the automated composition of applications at runtime. In this article, we discuss the requirements on algorithms that enable automatic configuration of pervasive applications. Furthermore, we show how finding a configuration can be interpreted as Distributed Constraint Satisfaction Problem. Based on this, we present an algorithm that is capable of finding an application configuration in the presence of strictly limited resources. To show the feasibility of this algorithm, we present an evaluation based on simulations and real‐world measurements and we compare the results with a simple greedy approximation.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

James D Hess and Bruce A. Benjamin

The purpose of this paper is to review the historical development of Lean Six Sigma and to identify the relevant opportunities for the application of Lean Six Sigma within…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the historical development of Lean Six Sigma and to identify the relevant opportunities for the application of Lean Six Sigma within the university setting. The paper also discusses the challenges of Lean Six Sigma implementation in higher education, as well as the cultural changes necessary to provide an appropriate climate for its long-term success.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper contains a comprehensive discussion of the development of Lean Six Sigma over the past three decades. Additionally, the paper describes how Lean Six Sigma may be applied in the university setting to improve processes in curriculum delivery; business and auxiliary services; admissions and enrollment management; and research.

Findings

Lean Six Sigma can be applied to facilitate process improvements in curriculum delivery; business and auxiliary services; admissions and enrollment management; and research. While obstacles to Lean Six Sigma implementation exist, the process improvements and resulting cultural changes are worthwhile and noteworthy.

Research limitations/implications

The paper serves as a guide for how Lean Six Sigma processes can be utilized in the higher education setting. Other researchers and practitioners may use the paper as a practical orientation to Lean Six Sigma in the university setting.

Originality/value

Due to the unique culture of higher education, the application of Lean Six Sigma to university processes has been sparse. The paper provides a needed orientation as to how Lean Six Sigma may be applied to improve some of the more important functional aspects of the university.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1958

Kurt Morgenroth

Unter Fremdenverkehrspolitik verstellt man ein differenziertes System von Massnahmen, deren Ziel es ist, auf die Gestaltung des Fremdenverkehrs massgeblich einzmvirken. So…

Abstract

Unter Fremdenverkehrspolitik verstellt man ein differenziertes System von Massnahmen, deren Ziel es ist, auf die Gestaltung des Fremdenverkehrs massgeblich einzmvirken. So wie der Begriff “Fremdenverkehr” eine Summe heterogener Teile darstellt, so erscheint auch die Fremdenverkehrspolitik als ein umfassender Komplex verschiedenartigster Bestrebungen. Ohne eine erschöpfende Aufzählung zu geben, ist die Fremdenverkehrspolitik als ein mixtum compositum anzusehen aus Elementen der allgemeinen Wirtschaftspolitik, wie Handels‐ und Verkehrspolitik, Finanzpolitik und Gewerbepolitik, aber auch der allgemeinen Politik, der Kulturpolitik, der Sozialpolitik und der Aussenpolitik.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Ozge Ozgen and Sumeyra Duman Kurt

The purpose of this study is to analyze the mediating role of pre‐recovery emotions on the relationship between severity of service failure and post‐recovery positive and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze the mediating role of pre‐recovery emotions on the relationship between severity of service failure and post‐recovery positive and negative emotions and to examine the mediating role of justice perceptions on the interaction between pre‐recovery and post‐recovery emotions.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative data were collected in the form of questionnaire which was applied to 238 respondents. The respondents include the consumers who experienced a service failure followed by a service recovery. In this study, post‐recovery positive and negative emotions were dependent variables whereas severity of service failure, pre‐recovery emotions and three dimensions of justice perceptions were the other main variables. In line with this purpose, eight hypotheses aiming to clarify the relations among these variables were tested using correlation and hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

The results suggest that post‐recovery negative emotions were affected by pre‐recovery emotions with the mediating role of distributive justice perceptions. The findings of this research reveal that dealing successfully with pre‐recovery emotions and integrating these emotions with favorable distributive justice perceptions have critical importance in mitigating the post‐recovery negative emotions.

Practical implications

During service recovery, service providers must concentrate on positive and negative emotions concurrently. Besides, managers also have to take pre‐recovery emotions into consideration and exert a special effort on distributive justice in order to decrease the intensity of post‐recovery negative emotions. Selection of recovery types, the effects of these on distributive justice perception and responding promptly to prevent pre‐recovery negative emotions are critically important for service providers.

Originality/Value

This study differs by focusing on pre‐recovery and post‐recovery emotions within a holistic view, which recommends the service providers an alternative perspective for being more proactive.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2011

Donald F. Dixon

The purpose of the paper is to describe and evaluate the changes in the content of the marketing theory course at Wharton 50 years ago, taught by Reavis Cox, as a result…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to describe and evaluate the changes in the content of the marketing theory course at Wharton 50 years ago, taught by Reavis Cox, as a result of the insertion of Wroe Alderson's book Marketing Behaviour and Executive Action.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a personal experience of taking the course before the insertion of Alderson's book and a review of the revised course outline.

Findings

The course content moved away from a broader philosophically based marketing systems course linked to ideas from other disciplines, to one focused on marketing management.

Originality/value

The period in question is an important turning point in the way marketing theory was taught and developed that influenced future development of the discipline in ways that narrowed its focus and limited its contribution.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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