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Book part
Publication date: 11 September 2020

D. K. Malhotra, Kunal Malhotra and Rashmi Malhotra

Traditionally, loan officers use different credit scoring models to complement judgmental methods to classify consumer loan applications. This study explores the use of…

Abstract

Traditionally, loan officers use different credit scoring models to complement judgmental methods to classify consumer loan applications. This study explores the use of decision trees, AdaBoost, and support vector machines (SVMs) to identify potential bad loans. Our results show that AdaBoost does provide an improvement over simple decision trees as well as SVM models in predicting good credit clients and bad credit clients. To cross-validate our results, we use k-fold classification methodology.

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Book part
Publication date: 11 September 2020

Abstract

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Applications of Management Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-001-6

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Gina L. Miller, Naresh K. Malhotra and Tracey M. King

Abstract

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Kunal Ganguly

The purpose of this paper is to present a comprehensive framework for quality-related performance measures linked to supply chain risk (SCR) by analyzing and framing them…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a comprehensive framework for quality-related performance measures linked to supply chain risk (SCR) by analyzing and framing them into a hierarchical structure.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, quality-related performance measures (QM) are identified on the basis of literature survey and expert opinion. The quality measures are formulated as hierarchy structure and fuzzy AHP as a multi attribute decision-making tool is applied to judge the viable candidates.

Findings

Based on a fuzzy AHP approach, a revised risk matrix with a continuous scale was proposed to assess the QMs’ classes. The result classifies the QMs in different categories (extreme, high, medium and low). Based on this result, some management implications and suggestions are proposed.

Originality/value

The present work proposes an assessment methodology for quality-related performance measures linked to SCR. The revised risk matrix with continuous scale for risk assessment in this field is a novel approach. This study contributes to the supply chain management and quality management literature, and provides suggestions for managers to adopt different strategies for different risk classes.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Gopal Kumar, Rabindra Nath Banerjee, Purushottam Lal Meena and Kunal Ganguly

The purpose of this paper is to model and investigate collaborative culture and relationship strength roles in supply chain collaboration. This research highlights…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to model and investigate collaborative culture and relationship strength roles in supply chain collaboration. This research highlights critical role played by culture and relationship strength in collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from relational view, a conceptual model is developed with the help of literature, and the model is validated with data collected in India using partial least squares method.

Findings

Results and analyses revealed that culture and relationship strength significantly and strongly influence each collaborative activity. The relationship strength fully mediates between collaborative culture and supply chain performance. The research also finds that the relationship strength partially mediates between collaborative culture and market-based information sharing, operational resource planning and sharing. In the long-term, collaborative culture drives relationship strength and the element enhances collaborative activities.

Originality/value

This research attempted to explore collaborative culture and relationship strength which are crucial for collaborative relationship. Many mediation effects are studied which increase the understanding and give insights for its implementation. Its theoretical and practical implications are highlighted. This knowledge has enough potential to lead collaborative relationships towards success.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Sourabh Arora, Kunal Singha and Sangeeta Sahney

Recent multichannel research suggests that consumers use multiple channels to reap attribute-based benefits which have led to showrooming phenomenon. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent multichannel research suggests that consumers use multiple channels to reap attribute-based benefits which have led to showrooming phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the reasons for consumers’ showrooming behaviour and propose a comprehensive model based on application and extension of the “Theory of planned behaviour”.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the probability sampling approach, 278 complete responses were obtained via web-based surveys for analysing the showrooming behaviour. The research model was tested using the “Partial least squares method” which follows a variance-based structural equation modelling approach.

Findings

The results of the study indicate that “touching and feeling the product” and “sales staff assistance” motivated customers to visit the physical store before buying online. “Better online service quality” and “lower prices online” induced customers to later purchase online. Price conscious customers and those with the ability to use multiple channels were more likely to engage in showrooming behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The generalization of the findings may be limited because the data were collected from a small sample size. The subject calls for more extensive research for drawing generalizations due to lack of the substantive literature on the core area of study.

Practical implications

The model proposed will help retailers in understanding the showrooming phenomenon which recent researchers have considered as a threat to retail. The study provides basis for devising strategies to defend showrooming customers.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the body of knowledge in retailing by proposing a model on showrooming which is an emerging area of research in the present retail landscape.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Shiwangi Singh, Akshay Chauhan and Sanjay Dhir

The purpose of this paper is to use Twitter analytics for analyzing the startup ecosystem of India.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use Twitter analytics for analyzing the startup ecosystem of India.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses descriptive analysis and content analytics techniques of social media analytics to examine 53,115 tweets from 15 Indian startups across different industries. The study also employs techniques such as Naïve Bayes Algorithm for sentiment analysis and Latent Dirichlet allocation algorithm for topic modeling of Twitter feeds to generate insights for the startup ecosystem in India.

Findings

The Indian startup ecosystem is inclined toward digital technologies, concerned with people, planet and profit, with resource availability and information as the key to success. The study categorizes the emotions of tweets as positive, neutral and negative. It was found that the Indian startup ecosystem has more positive sentiments than negative sentiments. Topic modeling enables the categorization of the identified keywords into clusters. Also, the study concludes on the note that the future of the Indian startup ecosystem is Digital India.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis provides a methodology that future researchers can use to extract relevant information from Twitter to investigate any issue.

Originality/value

Any attempt to analyze the startup ecosystem of India through social media analysis is limited. This research aims to bridge such a gap and tries to analyze the startup ecosystem of India from the lens of social media platforms like Twitter.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Alex Hill, Richard Cuthbertson, Benjamin Laker and Steve Brown

The purpose of this paper is to present 13 propositions about how internal strategic fit (often referred to as fit) impacts the business performance of low cost and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present 13 propositions about how internal strategic fit (often referred to as fit) impacts the business performance of low cost and differentiated services. It then uses these relationships to develop two “fitness ladder” frameworks to help practitioners understand how to improve fit given their business strategy (low cost or differentiation) and performance objectives (operational, financial or competitiveness).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 11 strategic business units were studied that perform differently and provide a range of low cost and differentiated services to understand how changes in internal strategic fit impacted business performance over a 7 year period.

Findings

The findings suggest aligning systems with market needs does not improve performance. Instead, firms serving low cost markets should first focus managers’ attention on processes and centralise resources around key processes, before reducing process flexibility and automate as many steps as possible to develop a low cost capability that is difficult to imitate. By contrast, firms serving differentiated markets should first focus managers’ attention on customers and then locate resources near them, before increasing customer contact with their processes and making them more flexible so they can develop customer knowledge, relationships and services that are difficult to imitate.

Research limitations/implications

Some significant factors may not have been considered as the study only looked at the impact of 14 internal strategic fit variables on 7 performance variables. Also, the performance changes may not be a direct result of the strategic fit improvements identified and may not generalise to other service organisations, settings and environments.

Practical implications

The strategic fit-performance relationships identified and the “fitness ladder” frameworks developed can be used by organisations to make decisions about how best to improve fit given their different market needs, business strategies and performance objectives.

Originality/value

The findings offer more clarity than previous research about how internal fit impacts business performance for low cost and differentiated services.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Hung Nguyen, George Onofrei and Dothang Truong

Research has extensively focused on the cultural differences in supply chain collaboration while neglecting the importance of cultural similarities and compatible goals…

Abstract

Purpose

Research has extensively focused on the cultural differences in supply chain collaboration while neglecting the importance of cultural similarities and compatible goals among supply chain members. With the rise of global supply chain network, the choice of supply chain orientation is critical. This study argues that performance differences between these configurations highlight managerial implications for sustainable development.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from uncertainty reduction and cognitive social capital theories, this study developed a taxonomy of manufacturing firms based on process alignment between cultural compatibility and supply chain communication. The empirical data used in this study were drawn from the Global Manufacturing Research Group (GMRG) survey project, with data collected from 680 manufacturing companies, across various industry sectors and countries.

Findings

There appeared to be consistent three major configurations: the Proactive, the Initiative and the Reactive. Manufacturers distanced themselves based mainly on communication with customers on events and proprietary information. Communication-cultural compatibility taxonomies influence differently on operations and financial performance. The Initiative, who excelled in communication practices gained significant improvement in efficiency and delivery measures. While Reactive lagged, Proactive aligned in both capabilities to experience higher payoffs in operational and financial measures. The findings offer a step-by-step approach where manufacturers intensify communication with partners for better efficiency and delivery measures, then align cultural practices to obtain financial, quality and innovation performance.

Research limitations/implications

It will be fruitful for future research to examine the evolution of longitudinally. A comparison between developed and developing economies will be of interest.

Practical implications

The findings provide a step-by-step decision-making process for supply chain communication and offer guidance especially for global supply chain managers.

Originality/value

This study adds greater comprehensiveness and richness to the information exchange literature on performance by process aligning to enhance cultural compatibility.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Abstract

Subject area

Marketing strategy.

Study level/applicability

The course is well suited for MBA and Executive MBA class on Strategic Management, Marketing Strategy, Brand Management, Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Change in emerging economies. The case can also be taught to senior undergraduate students to explore the issues mentioned in the case as an integrative case for courses like Strategic Management and Marketing Strategy.

Case overview

Niyogi Books had positioned itself as an independent publishing house with a focus on the niche area of trade books. Due to the internet, digitalization and globalization the dynamics of the book publishing industry had changed considerably, and the company needed to think and reflect on its current position and future strategy. Niyogi Books had added new products and new markets along with other innovations to succeed in the business of publishing. But the way ahead for Niyogi Books was to innovate in light of fast-paced technological advancement. The company needed to balance the digitization of content as well as retailing with its existing print strategy. A related issue is the need to plan an innovative and cost-effective communication strategy to boost sales.

Expected learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are as follows: analyze the business environment of the publishing industry, realize the need for a branding strategy for small business and apply communication strategies single/multi-channel setting, understand the need of an organization to purposefully adapt an organization’s (self-) resource base (management capability to effectively coordinate and redeploy internal and external competences) and analyze the role of a growth strategy and how it can be used to devise a product/marketing strategy.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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