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1 – 10 of 31
Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Jiraporn Pradabwong, Christos Braziotis, James D.T. Tannock and Kulwant S. Pawar

This study aims to examine the interrelationships among business process management (BPM), supply chain collaboration (SCC), collaborative advantage and organisational performance.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the interrelationships among business process management (BPM), supply chain collaboration (SCC), collaborative advantage and organisational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 204 manufacturing firms in Thailand, and the interrelationships proposed in the framework were tested via structural equation modelling.

Findings

This study highlights the role of intra- and inter-organisational practices and clearly demonstrates the joint role and impact of BPM and SCC, respectively. The results provide empirical evidence that BPM improves both organisational performance and collaborative activities. Also, SCC and collaborative advantage can have indirect positive impacts on organisational performance.

Research limitations/implications

This work could be expanded by adopting a supplementary dyadic or extended supply chain (SC) approach and could also consider contextual factors, which were outside of the scope of this study.

Practical implications

The BPM approach has a positive impact on organisational performance, which is essential for collaborative activities between a firm and its SC partners. Further, effective BPM and SCC practices lead to enhanced performance and collaborative benefits. Practitioners should be better able to define and measure specific actions relating to their BPM and SCC practices.

Originality value

This paper stresses the need to consider the interrelationships between BPM, SCC, collaborative advantage and organisational performance for both direct and indirect effects. Rather than focusing only on improvement at individual firm level, SCC is vital to compete in the market. Improving the effectiveness of SC allows higher organisational performance levels than those that could be achieved in isolation.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2018

Min Zhang, Yinan Qi, Zhiqiang Wang, Kulwant S. Pawar and Xiande Zhao

Intellectual capital reflects the sum of existing knowledge a manufacturer is able to leverage and plays a critical role in new product development. The purpose of this…

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Abstract

Purpose

Intellectual capital reflects the sum of existing knowledge a manufacturer is able to leverage and plays a critical role in new product development. The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the mechanisms through which intellectual capital enhances product innovation performance and how economic and institutional environments affect the mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a knowledge-based view and institutional theory, this study proposes a model on the relationships among intellectual capital, supplier knowledge integration, supply chain adaptability, and product innovation performance. The hypotheses are empirically tested using multiple group structural equation modelling and data collected from 300 Chinese and 200 Indian manufacturers.

Findings

The authors find that intellectual capital improves product innovation performance both directly and indirectly through supplier knowledge integration. However, the effects are different in China and India. In particular, the direct effect of intellectual capital on product innovation performance is significantly higher in China than that in India, and intellectual capital improves product innovation performance indirectly through supplier knowledge integration only in India. The authors also find that supplier knowledge integration improves product innovation performance indirectly through supply chain adaptability in both China and India.

Originality/value

Using a moderated mediation model, this study provides insights into the joint effects of intellectual capital, supplier knowledge integration, and supply chain adaptability on product innovation performance. The findings enhance current understandings of how supply chain management helps a manufacturer develop new products using existing knowledge and the influences of economic and institutional environments on knowledge and supply chain management.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 118 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Helen Rogers, Norbert Baricz and Kulwant S. Pawar

The purpose of this paper is to identify and classify the available types of 3D printing services, with the scope of determining the potential implications that such…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and classify the available types of 3D printing services, with the scope of determining the potential implications that such services could have on the supply chains of manufacturing firms and creating a research agenda for future studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review the current literature on the potential supply chain impacts of 3D printing and evaluate the 3D printing services provided by 404 firms in selected European markets.

Findings

The results show that 3D printing services form a rapidly evolving industry, with new service providers entering the market on a regular basis. Evidence from the European markets investigated suggests that services can be classified into three distinct categories: generative, facilitative and selective services.

Research limitations/implications

This paper represents an attempt to take stock of a fast-moving and potentially paradigm-shifting market. The implications are dynamic as new applications, business models and techniques are continually being developed. Further studies are required to substantiate the findings.

Practical implications

Three categories of 3D printing services that could significantly impact supply chain configurations of the future are proposed. Several issues specific to 3D printing services raised in the research agenda require further scrutiny and substantiation before services can reach their full potential.

Originality/value

This paper provides an overview of the growing 3D printing services industry, highlighting how the market might change as additive manufacturing technology matures.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 46 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

Atanu Chaudhuri, Helen Rogers, Peder Soberg and Kulwant S. Pawar

The purpose of this paper is to identify challenges faced by industrial firms at different phases of adoption of 3D printing (3DP), and outline how 3DP service providers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify challenges faced by industrial firms at different phases of adoption of 3D printing (3DP), and outline how 3DP service providers can help address these challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

Separate interview questionnaires for 3DP users and 3DP service providers were used to conduct semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The key 3DP adoption challenges are as follows: creating a business case; difficulty in using different materials; optimising the process for specific parts; lack of “plug and play” solutions offered by equipment manufacturers; limited availability of training and educational support; poor end product quality; machine breakdowns; and high cost of maintenance and spare components. Using the theoretical lens of the technology acceptance model, results show a lack of ease of use and technological turbulence impact companies’ decisions to adopt 3DP. 3DP service providers can indeed attempt to alleviate the above challenges faced by customers through providing multiple 3DP services across different stages of adoption.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should examine the role of 3DP equipment manufacturers and design and modeling software solutions providers in improving adoption and how 3DP equipment manufacturers could develop into more integrated service providers as the technology advances.

Practical implications

Service providers can help customers transition to 3DP and should develop a portfolio of services that fits different phases of adoption.

Originality/value

The paper outlines how 3DP service providers can help address customer challenges in adoption of 3DP across different stages of adoption.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 119 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Johann C.K.H. Riedel and Kulwant S. Pawar

Reports on research based on the results of a survey of design management in the UK mechanical engineering industry. Considers the issue of which aspects of production…

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Abstract

Reports on research based on the results of a survey of design management in the UK mechanical engineering industry. Considers the issue of which aspects of production were considered in the design of products and when. Demonstrates that at the prototype stage production aspects became the most important. This shows that the manufacturability of the product is not considered until after it has been designed. Concludes that the effective and efficient manufacture of the product is not given sufficient attention by mechanical engineering firms. Also investigates the involvement of production personnel in the design process. Finds that production engineering was more extensively involved in the design process the closer it moved towards manufacture. Points to further research which hopes to address this lack by providing practical tools for the application of concurrent engineering.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Min Zhang, Kulwant S. Pawar, Janat Shah and Peeyush Mehta

Many pharmaceutical companies outsource their research and development and manufacturing operations to value chain partners. Effective evaluation of outsourcees'…

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Abstract

Purpose

Many pharmaceutical companies outsource their research and development and manufacturing operations to value chain partners. Effective evaluation of outsourcees' capabilities and relationship management are often central for outsourcers to secure sustainable competitive advantage. This study aims to investigate how to evaluate outsourcees and manage outsourcing relationships in the pharmaceutical industry based on the theory of dynamic capability (DC).

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation used an exploratory multiple case study approach. The data collection, spanning a period of 12 months, entailed a multinational pharmaceutical company (PharmCo) with its headquarters in Europe, and four contract research and manufacturing organizations from China and India.

Findings

The results show that PharmCo evaluates its outsourcing partners based on their dynamic capabilities, which include processes (project deliverables, communication, and accuracy of costs), positions (financial assets, number of scientists, spectrum of services, and geographical presence), and paths (past experiences). The findings indicate that a pharmaceutical company outsources to partners with high operational capabilities, whereas it builds fully integrated outsourcing relationships only with those that have high dynamic capabilities.

Practical implications

Findings from this study provide guidelines for practitioners in manufacturing industries to efficiently and effectively evaluate and manage outsourcees to deal with the challenges and risks associated with strategic outsourcing.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature by providing empirical evidence on the role of DC in outsourcee evaluation and outsourcing relationship management in the pharmaceutical industry. Moreover, the paper illustrates how to conceptualize and measure the DC as a multi-dimensional construct. The analysis also indicates that partners' dynamic and operational capabilities play different roles in outsourcing relationship management.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Kulwant S. Pawar and Helen Driva

Reports on the findings of research undertaken at the University ofNottingham into Computing Services firms in the UK. The studyparticularly focuses on firms who are…

Abstract

Reports on the findings of research undertaken at the University of Nottingham into Computing Services firms in the UK. The study particularly focuses on firms who are currently exporting to Germany. The implications of the European Single Market and the changes which will affect the Computing Services (CS) sector are discussed along with a full examination of the current state of the German market. Information from the research of successful entrants and results of interviews with the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) have also been included. The development of the European Community′s policy, together with the views of successful organizations operating in the CS market, provide an insight into some of the factors influencing planning for 1992 and act as a useful starting point for new entrants. Finally, proposes guidelines for computing services firms intending to enter the German market.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 92 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Kulwant S. Pawar and Sudi Sharifi

States that the design process includes redesigning, which implies that customer requirements, their scrutiny of the design outcome and their experiences are integral to…

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Abstract

States that the design process includes redesigning, which implies that customer requirements, their scrutiny of the design outcome and their experiences are integral to the frame of reference of the enterprise. Furthermore, the role of design function is redefined here, and becomes one, which will maintain the continuity of the process and is to do with co‐ordination and communication; that is, between designers, suppliers and customers. Traditional organizational structures and approaches inadequately address the context, which is conducive for parallelism and co‐operation and so on. This article explores the dynamics of the relationship between suppliers and customers regarding the design process in the manufacturing sector and proposes some scenarios for rethinking the dynamics of the interface and its role in shaping the design process. The arguments are evidenced and supported by a set of case examples conducted by the authors. Draws some lessons from these examples and speculates on the managerial and organizational implications.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

1 – 10 of 31