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Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Kristine M. Kuhn, Jeroen Meijerink and Anne Keegan

This work examines the intersection between traditional human resource management and the novel employment arrangements of the expanding gig economy. While there is a…

Abstract

This work examines the intersection between traditional human resource management and the novel employment arrangements of the expanding gig economy. While there is a substantial multidisciplinary literature on the digital platform labor phenomenon, it has been largely centered on the experiences of gig workers. As digital labor platforms continue to grow and specialize, more managers, executives, and human resource practitioners will need to make decisions about whether and how to utilize gig workers. Here the authors explore and interrogate the unique features of human resource management (HRM) activities in the context of digital labor platforms. The authors discuss challenges and opportunities regarding (1) HRM in organizations that outsource labor needs to external labor platforms, (2) HRM functions within digital labor platform firms, and (3) HRM policies and practices for organizations that develop their own spin-off digital labor platform. To foster a more nuanced understanding of work in the gig economy, the authors identify common themes across these contexts, highlight knowledge gaps, offer recommendations for future research, and outline pathways for collecting empirical data on HRM in the gig economy.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-430-5

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Kristine M. Kuhn

The purpose of this paper is to explore variation in the responses of human resource practitioners and managers to criminal offenses.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore variation in the responses of human resource practitioners and managers to criminal offenses.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper considers background checks as a personnel selection test. In the first study, 280 professionals with hiring experience indicate how various criminal offenses, described as having occurred either within the past year or several years ago, would affect their evaluation of an applicant for a call center position. In the second study, a separate sample of 109 practitioners evaluates criminal as well as non-criminal transgressions that might appear on a background report.

Findings

In Study 1, both the apparent seriousness of an offense and its recency influence modal responses. Even non-violent misdemeanors from several years ago, however, are judged as automatically disqualifying by some participants. Study 2 shows that a practitioner’s attitude toward criminal offenses is distinct from their attitude to related forms of stigma. Results from both studies find associations between demographic variables and general willingness to accept applicants with criminal records.

Originality/value

This work provides quantitative data on practitioner reactions to several specific criminal offenses for a specific job context. By considering differences among offenses and among gatekeepers, rather than among applicants, it identifies challenges to fair implementation of background checks during the hiring process.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Abstract

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-430-5

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

K.D. Joshi and Kristine M. Kuhn

This article aims to investigate prototypes of excellent performance in IT consulting and to examine the gender typing of the critical attributes used in prototyping.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to investigate prototypes of excellent performance in IT consulting and to examine the gender typing of the critical attributes used in prototyping.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory qualitative data were collected from focus group sessions and interviews of employees of a large international IT consulting firm. Responses were coded according to the gender typing of elicited attributes and content analysis was used to examine responses across stakeholders and levels.

Findings

The picture that emerged of a “top performer” covered a variety of skills and attributes, and overall was somewhat masculine‐typed. An employee's own characterization of excellent performance in his/her own job level was not necessarily congruent with other stakeholders' perceptions.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from only one US‐based company and client perceptions were not directly assessed. Future research is needed to establish how prototypes impact performance evaluations and employee outcomes.

Practical implications

List of top performer attributes suggests ways in which IS/IT curricula could be improved, and also will be useful for recruitment and development of top performers.

Originality/value

This paper goes beyond identifying necessary skill sets to examine what “excellence” means to various stakeholders. It suggests it may be critical to understand how employees match up, or not, to this prototype.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2016

Kristine Kuhn, Tera Galloway and Maureen Collins-Williams

The purpose of this paper is to examine small business owners’ informal advice-seeking from peers, with a focus on the opportunities afforded by the internet for owners to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine small business owners’ informal advice-seeking from peers, with a focus on the opportunities afforded by the internet for owners to acquire assistance from other owner-managers outside their local community.

Design/methodology/approach

Over 600 owner-managers in a rural US state were surveyed about their advice-seeking during the previous year from peers in the same community, from non-local peers they had met in person, and from peers known only online. Mixed effects logistic regression analysis was used to test both main effects of business and owner characteristics on advice-seeking and interactions with type/location of peer advisors.

Findings

Most owners had received advice from peers, and one-third had received advice online from a peer whom they had never met in person. Business performance was not associated with overall use of peer advice, but did interact significantly with source; the use of online-only advisors was associated with business growth, suggesting the possible benefit of weak ties. Over two-thirds of respondents reported having used social media and/or online forums to access advice or support from other owners (both those met in person and those not), with women and younger owners more likely to rely on such tools.

Originality/value

This study shows that entrepreneurial research needs to consider peer advisors beyond local networks as potential resources for small business owners. While previous research has examined entrepreneurs’ use of social media for marketing, this study shows its utility for accessing advice.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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