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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2018

Kristijan Krkač

The supposedly radical development of artificial intelligence (AI) has raised questions regarding the moral responsibility of it. In the sphere of business, they are…

Abstract

Purpose

The supposedly radical development of artificial intelligence (AI) has raised questions regarding the moral responsibility of it. In the sphere of business, they are translated into questions about AI and business ethics (BE) and corporate social responsibility (CSR). The purpos of this study is to conceptually reformulate these questions from the point of view of two possible aspect-changes, namely, starting from corporate social irresponsibility (CSI) and starting not from AIs incapability for responsibility but from its ability to imitate human CSR without performing typical human CSI.

Design/methodology/approach

The author draws upon the literature and his previous works on the relationship between AI and human CSI. This comparison aims to remodel the understanding of human CSI and AIs inability to be CSI. The conceptual remodelling is offered by taking a negative view on the relation. If AI can be made not to perform human-like CSI, then AI is at least less CSI than humans. For this task, it is necessary to remodel human and AI CSR, but AI does not have to be CSR. It is sufficient that it can be less CSI than humans to be more CSR.

Findings

The previously suggested remodelling of basic concepts in question leads to the conclusion that it is not impossible for AI to act or operate more CSI then humans simply by not making typical human CSIs. Strictly speaking, AI is not CSR because it cannot be responsible as humans can. If it can perform actions with a significantly lesser amount of CSI in comparison to humans, it is certainly less CSI.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is only a conceptual remodelling and a suggestion of a research hypothesis. As such, it implies particular morality, ethics and the concepts of CSI and AI.

Practical implications

How this remodelling could be done in practice is an issue of future research.

Originality/value

The author delivers the paper on comparison between human and AI CSI which is not much discussed in literature.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Jelena Debeljak and Kristijan Krkač

This paper aims to elucidate some of the arguments against egoism in the current debate, as well as to create some new arguments, or rather objections (epistemological and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to elucidate some of the arguments against egoism in the current debate, as well as to create some new arguments, or rather objections (epistemological and ontological from the position of egoism as moral solipsism), and to explicate some arguments against egoism (descriptive, normative, and ideological) as being not so convincing. It also aims to explicate Jesus's second commandment in a fashion similar to that of Adam Smith when he tried to combine self‐love with sympathy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the premise that some foundational philosophies, worldviews, or paradigms exemplify at least one type of egoism/selfish strategy. In that light the analysis of egoism and the objections are formulated.

Findings

They paper finds that present arguments in favour of egoism in business, and especially as certain “business ethics”, are not acceptable, at least on the practical and theoretical grounds on which they are presented as sound arguments.

Research limitations/implications

The paper implies that there is fundamental difference between theoretical and practical egoism, and that practical egoism sometimes uses the theoretical one as its “quasi‐justification”.

Practical implications

The paper can be summarized in a series of general advices about an altruistic attitude and practices which in the long term show more benefits than costs for any group, and consequently for business organizations as well.

Original/value

The paper presents ontological and epistemological interpretations and objections against egoism, emphasizing the somewhat neutral or at least bivalent position of Adam Smith regarding the matter in question, and introducing altruistic strategies as being compatible with the basic ideas of a free‐market system.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Jelena Debeljak, Kristijan Krkač and Ivana Bušljeta Banks

This paper seeks to focus on CSR manifested regarding two points, namely CSR insincerity and authenticity from the point of view of pragmatist and care ethics principles…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to focus on CSR manifested regarding two points, namely CSR insincerity and authenticity from the point of view of pragmatist and care ethics principles. Its purpose is to evaluate critically the genuineness of the early stages in acquiring CSR practices, and to advance the notion of authenticity in its mature development stage. The analyses seek to show an imbalance between the so‐called feminine and masculine principles in the professional business arena, which prevents an authentic CSR business approach taking place.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors approach the topic from various concepts and criteria of moral correctness regarding CSR, and crucial change points in the transient process from insincere to authentic CSR.

Findings

The paper identifies some elements of insincere CSR in every company in its early stages of acquiring CSR practices, especially in the early stages of the development of the business culture, and also during the maturing process.

Research limitations/implications

The paper demonstrates the excessive significance of the rapid development of CSR sensibility in society and in the business community because, in such situations, knowledge of all affected parties prevents business subjects from misdirection and forces them to choose between lying and telling the truth.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates a business‐based rationale for the adoption of mature, non‐deceptive CSR practices, since the overall situation in the business community and in society becomes clearer regarding criteria.

Originality/value

An authentic approach to business by companies as legal persons in the light of pragmatist and care ethics principles for CSR enables them to identify themselves very precisely and transparently.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Jelena Debeljak and Kristijan Krkac

Abstract

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

S. Mercia Selva Malar

This paper seeks to emphasise the importance of firms being responsible to society.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to emphasise the importance of firms being responsible to society.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines firms' omissions and commissions in the various functional areas of management while they focused on profit. Examples of such omissions and commissions are also discussed. Support from businessmen and authors who share such a viewpoint is mentioned

Findings

In the long term, firms that are socially responsible are successful.

Practical implications

Practising social responsibility consciously, firms can make the world a better place for all people. It can be beneficial for the entire society.

Originality/value

Omissions and commissions arising out of being profit‐focused are the author's original contribution. The paper is of value to researchers and practitioners of corporate social responsibility and business ethics. Firms need to understand that they cannot succeed and excel for long if they neglect stakeholders other than shareholders.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

M.A. Musa, S.E. Ismail and S. Othman

The purpose of this paper is to attract readers' attention to the importance of the integration of corporate governance and innovation for companies to strive further in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to attract readers' attention to the importance of the integration of corporate governance and innovation for companies to strive further in business. The paper also attempts to illustrate how an innovation champion can exist in companies with a good corporate governance structure and fully utilize the structure, at the same time being aware of the limitations of innovation activities. Along the way, corporate social responsibilities should also be taken into consideration.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives of this paper are achieved first through an explanation of how corporate governance structure works and what purpose it serves. By understanding the mechanics of corporate governance, the integration of the structure with other fields of knowledge, in order to boost corporate performance, becomes possible. The paper also makes several references to companies around the world which have integrated successfully.

Findings

Innovation is a teamwork effort. Concentrated efforts are needed from every person in the organisation, from the board of directors and all the employees. The main actor in the picture is the board of directors. Also, other critical factors such as culture, conducive environment and rewards very much need to be present in the system.

Practical implications

Innovation, even though deemed risky, must be supported. The board of directors or leaders of corporations must change the way they think. Leaders of corporations must make an effort to understand innovation, and subsequently spread it far and wide among managers by creating corporate policies that support innovation. With a consumer‐centric organizational principle in mind, corporations can improve their innovation success rate. A successful innovation effort requires full participation from everyone in the corporation to ensure that the end results of research and development are for the interests of society at large.

Originality/value

Corporate governance is a structure that needs input from other fields of knowledge. Too much faith is put in corporate governance to bring about performance; unfortunately corporate governance is just a structure. There are a lot more factors that should be taken into consideration before achievement can be seen and success stories can be heard. This integration of knowledge is suggested to companies so that they can generate more revenue.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

David Birch

This paper aims to reflect briefly on some of the major principles that have emerged from the developing policies, practices and debates about corporate citizenship in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to reflect briefly on some of the major principles that have emerged from the developing policies, practices and debates about corporate citizenship in the last ten years or so.

Design/methodology/approach

Considerable scholarly work has been conducted on corporate citizenship in the past, and will continue to be done in the future. This paper is deliberately written for a non‐scholarly audience.

Findings

Ten principles are outlined, all of them focusing on developing a cultural aspect of corporate citizenship as good business.

Originality/value

The basic premise of this paper is that significant cultural change, through corporate citizenship will only take place by business implementing policies, and practices based on the sort of sound (but basic) principles presented here. These ten principles, in this format, are original to this paper.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Mirna Koričan and Ivija Jelavić

The purpose of this paper is to present the idea that CSR needs to be communicated from four different levels – government, community, company, and the individual. It also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the idea that CSR needs to be communicated from four different levels – government, community, company, and the individual. It also aims to stress that women managers in Croatia are still discriminated against and to show that managers in SMEs in Croatia need to become more aware of the importance of CSR.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on several different researches conducted on different populations – those of women managers and of SME managers.

Findings

The findings of this paper show that, for the improvement of CSR awareness in general, the CSR idea needs to be communicated on four different levels simultaneously. Even though there are more women managers in higher positions in Croatia, they are still discriminated against. Managers of small and medium‐sized enterprises are still not thinking enough about all stakeholders when making decisions.

Practical implications

This paper shows that, in practice, government, community, companies and individuals should be consistent in communicating and working on the CSR idea for the general welfare and advancement of society.

Originality/value

The main value of the paper is that it provides the newest results on CSR for companies in Croatia. This paper also gives a new perspective on the importance of simultaneous attempts to communicate the CSR idea for the advancement of society.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Riham Ragab Rizk

In the light of major corporate failures worldwide, business ethics have become an increasingly important area of managerial competence and responsibility. Most studies on…

Abstract

Purpose

In the light of major corporate failures worldwide, business ethics have become an increasingly important area of managerial competence and responsibility. Most studies on business ethics in general and the work ethic in particular have been based on the experiences of Western nations, with a primary focus on the Protestant work ethic (PWE) as advanced by Max Weber. This paper aims primarily to explore the Islamic perspective to ethics, which follows the Judeo‐Christian tradition as the last of the three great monotheistic religions.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of relevant works published over the past two decades is compared with and heavily supplemented by extracts from the Islamic Holy Book, the Qur'an, in order to outline the Islamic approach to business and work ethics.

Findings

The paper highlights that within the Holy Qur'an and other aspects of Shari'ah, there is much with which to construct an authentic Islamic approach to ethics. It also highlights the substantial need to examine the work ethic and other work‐related attitudes, such as individualism in non‐Western settings.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the body of knowledge in several ways. First, it is one of a very limited number of papers that does not use a research instrument created specifically to measure work orientations in a Western setting. Second, it provides a better understanding of cultural variations among nations, by examining the ethical beliefs of the fastest growing religion in the world.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Fernanda Duarte

The purpose of this paper is to investigate students’ perceptions of studying ethics in a business management degree.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate students’ perceptions of studying ethics in a business management degree.

Design/methodology/approach

The method used is qualitative design with some quantitative elements. Data were collected through an anonymous survey with 119 students from a management subject, and analysed in the light of deontological and theological theories of ethics.

Findings

A large majority of the students surveyed (95 percent) believed that the study of ethics in management is important, and that they had personally benefited from studying ethics in the subject surveyed (84 percent). Four major thematic patterns emerged in the responses: a teleological view of ethics; a “hybrid” view of ethics; a link between ethical behaviour and leadership; and a gap between the ideal and practice of ethics.

Research limitations/implications

The study had a small sample and referred only to one subject. Further studies should be done with larger samples, comparing different cohorts of students, or students at different stages of a degree.

Practical implications

The study draws attention to issues that emerge from the teaching of ethics in management, in particular the need for sustained efforts to foster critical thinking and reflexivity among management students.

Originality/value

The paper is based on an original study that addresses the current gap in studies investigating management students’ attitudes to studying ethics. It is particularly valuable for ethics teachers.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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