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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Gail Dantzker, Arthur J. Lurigio, Susan Hartnett, Sheila Houmes, Sigurlina Davidsdottir and Kristen Donovan

This article presents the findings of a process evaluation of training for Chicago’s Alternative Policing Strategy (CAPS), which is the city’s version of community…

Abstract

This article presents the findings of a process evaluation of training for Chicago’s Alternative Policing Strategy (CAPS), which is the city’s version of community policing. The study’s approach and instrumentation were adopted from the field of adult education and involved observation and ratings of trainee and trainer behaviors. Two types of training were observed: orientation and skills building. Also, personal interviews were conducted with sergeants, lieutenants, and sworn trainers. The trainers overall were enthusiastic and knowledgeable but did not make adequate techniques to draw participants into the learning process. The article concludes with recommendations on how to implement training for community policing.

Details

Police Studies: Intnl Review of Police Development, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0141-2949

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Jacqueline Barnes, Kristen MacPherson and Rob Senior

The study reported here aimed to evaluate the impact on parenting and the home environment of community volunteer home visiting offered during or soon after pregnancy to…

Abstract

The study reported here aimed to evaluate the impact on parenting and the home environment of community volunteer home visiting offered during or soon after pregnancy to potentially vulnerable mothers. A cluster‐randomised study allocated Home‐Start schemes to intervention or comparison (existing services) conditions. Mothers were screened at routine health checks. Families in intervention and comparison areas were assessed at two and 12 months. The results showed that comparing families receiving support and those in comparison areas, there were few differences. There was a greater reduction in parent‐child relationship difficulties for supported families, but they offered their children fewer healthy foods. There was no evidence of enhanced parenting, organisation of the home environment or more appropriate use of health services. Comparing families receiving support with a second comparison group, living in intervention areas but not receiving support, no differences were found. The article concludes that a more structured approach may be required to make changes in parenting behaviour and the home environment.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2013

Lindsey N. Godwin, Pascal Kaplan and Kristin Bodiford

The very nature of organizational life is transforming as collaborative technologies erase the prerequisite of co-location for collaboration. Using three example cases of…

Abstract

The very nature of organizational life is transforming as collaborative technologies erase the prerequisite of co-location for collaboration. Using three example cases of which we have been a part, World Vision, the American Society for Association Executives, and Healthy Kids Healthy Schools, we illustrate how such technology is also augmenting the generative capacity of the Appreciative Inquiry (AI) Summit methodology. We then use the five principles of wikinomics that Tapscott and Williams (2010) identify as keys for organizational thrival into today’s digitally connected world: collaboration, openness, sharing, integrity, and interdependence, as a lens for examining how the virtually connected AI Summit is a whole-system change methodology that helps to promote these principles. The chapter concludes with lessons on integrating collaborative technology into summit designs and opportunities for future experiments in this domain.

Details

Organizational Generativity: The Appreciative Inquiry Summit and a Scholarship of Transformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-330-8

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

David Ackerman and Kristen Walker

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of the physical environment of night markets in Taiwan, mediated by “renao” (translated as bustling with noise and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of the physical environment of night markets in Taiwan, mediated by “renao” (translated as bustling with noise and excitement) on need fulfillment and shopping satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded theory, interviews and observation in Study One identify concepts important to understanding why consumers shopped in night markets. Study Two employs a survey method to test findings from Study One concerning relationships between fulfillment of social and hedonic needs, physical factors and renao on consumer perceptions of the night market.

Findings

This paper suggests dense physical environments of night markets serve needs of consumers in cultures with an interdependent self‐concept by creating renao. The physical environment impacts the social and experiential needs fulfilled by shopping there, ultimately affecting satisfaction with and use of the market. They also find the dynamics of renao in a collectivist society act as a mediating factor in this process.

Research limitations/implications

The experience of being around many people creating bustle and excitement in the retail environment is important to need fulfillment and satisfaction of shoppers in this collectivist culture. Future research could expand to other collectivist cultures and compare results with those for shoppers in individualist cultures.

Practical implications

This research will help those in tourism and hospitality planning understand how socio‐cultural norms influence use of retail space and leisure shopping satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper provides evidence that consumers in collectivist cultures may be more attracted to densely concentrated retail spaces.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Dimaz Ramananda and Apriani Dorkas Rambu Atahau

The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent of voluntary corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure by Indonesian firms on their social media and to compare…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent of voluntary corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure by Indonesian firms on their social media and to compare it with the mandatory disclosure on their annual reports.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use publicly listed Indonesian firms that are included in the SRI-KEHATI Index as the sample. Further, by using NVIVO software, the authors qualitatively analyze CSR activities disclosed on firms’ social media and annual reports with an interpretive approach.

Findings

The findings indicate that Indonesian firms still exhibit early stages of social media-based voluntary CSR disclosure. Further, issues on training, education and skill building dominate firms’ disclosure. Finally, Indonesian firms disclose less CSR information in their social media than in their annual reports, thus confirming the early stages of social media-based CSR disclosure.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size limits the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

This paper provides insights on which CSR issues are commonly disclosed in firms’ social media. This study may also inform regulators the extent of disclosures that could be regulated in social media.

Originality/value

Social media-based CSR disclosure in developing countries is relatively understudied. Thus, this paper empirically shows the topic and intensity of CSR disclosure in social media and the comparison between this type of CSR disclosure with CSR disclosure using other media.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Maria Lucila Osorio, Edgar Centeno and Jesus Cambra-Fierro

The purpose of this study is threefold. First, human brands are conceptualized and the distinction between them and personal brands is established. Second, human-brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is threefold. First, human brands are conceptualized and the distinction between them and personal brands is established. Second, human-brand research is reviewed in light of a strategic brand management framework and gaps in the knowledge that may suggest new research pathways are identified. Third, the extent to which a brand management model designed for products could be applied to human brands is explored.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was conducted in this study. The content analysis of the selected set of papers allowed the assessment of the state of this field of brand management and the identification of proposals for future research.

Findings

Substantial research exists on different aspects of human brands. However, these studies are fragmented in nature, thus highlighting the need for specific and complete human-brand management models.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this literature review is that it is based on a sample of papers collected by one specific criterion; furthermore, the way the papers were classified may be challenged. However, this study provides a comprehensive picture of studies on human brands available today.

Originality/value

A parsimonious distinction and connectivity between human and personal brands suggest a branding-by-individual continuum. Additionally, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first identifiable one that summarizes the growing literature on human brands, reveals important gaps in the knowledge and calls for the development of particular human-brand management models.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2005

Ward Churchill

There is no argument among serious researchers that a mongoloid stock first colonized the New World from Asia. Nor is there controversy about the fact that these…

Abstract

There is no argument among serious researchers that a mongoloid stock first colonized the New World from Asia. Nor is there controversy about the fact that these continental pioneers used the Bering Land Bridge that then connected the Asian Far East with Alaska.– Gerald F. Shields, et al.American Journal of Genetics (1992)

Details

Social Theory as Politics in Knowledge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-363-1

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Manisha Kumar, Nicholas Rich, Maneesh Kumar and Ying Liu

This paper aims to explore patient to care provider reverse exchanges to improve the care processes and service supply chain using an online feedback platform. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore patient to care provider reverse exchanges to improve the care processes and service supply chain using an online feedback platform. This paper demonstrates how a better understanding of timely and unsolicited feedback (“voice of the patient as a customer”) stimulates local interventions to improve service delivery and enact the essential characteristics of highly reliable organisations (HRO).

Design/methodology/approach

A realist approach involving an exploratory hospital case study using user feedback from an IT patient feedback platform. The methodology included interviews, secondary data and access to thousands of patient feedback narratives.

Findings

The findings show that a systems approach to the supply chain, using real-time feedback to enact process improvement is beneficial and a fruitful source of innovation for professional services staff. The setting of the improvement focusses on a true “voice of the customer” rather than attempting to improve arbitrarily internal process efficiency has major benefits for staff and their engagement with the right interventions to support higher performance.

Practical implications

The findings show major positive benefits for the adaptation and constant reflection of staff on the service provided to patients. The approach provides a means of reflecting as to whether the current supply chain and service provision are fit for purpose, as well as reliable, efficient and of value to the consumer.

Originality/value

This study is one of a few that adopt the consumer orientation needed to fully exploit the concepts of patient-centric improvement by including dynamic feedback in the supply chain and systems approach to care.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Cornelia Niessen, Christine Swarowsky and Markus Leiz

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between age and adaptation to changes in the workplace (perceived demand‐ability fit, task performance before and after…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between age and adaptation to changes in the workplace (perceived demand‐ability fit, task performance before and after change). It also seeks to explore two mediators of the potential age‐adaptation relationships: adaptive self‐efficacy and job experience.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 117 employees from three multinational organizations completed two questionnaires one month before and three months after changes in their workplaces.

Findings

Hierarchical linear modelling revealed that age was not related to fit and performance before but was negatively related to fit and performance after organizational change. These relationships were mediated by job experience. Job experience made it more difficult for employees – whether young or old – to adapt to workplace changes. Adaptive self‐efficacy did not mediate the negative age‐adaptation association.

Research limitations/implications

In the sample, only a few employees were older than 56 years which might limit the generalizability of the results. Future research should also attempt to include objective performance data.

Practical implications

Managerial interventions regarding learning, development, and job rotation might counteract negative effects of job tenure.

Originality/value

There is little empirical research addressing issues related to age and adaptation in the workplace. The longitudinal field study presented in the paper contributes to the literature on individual adaptation to changes in the workplace by empirically examining the relationship between age and indicators of adaptation, and its mediating factors.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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